atans1

Posts Tagged ‘MIIF’

MIIF & FCT: Useful updates

In China, Property, Reits on 17/05/2012 at 6:51 am

Never summed up the courage to buy MIIF because although it is a China infrastructure play, yirld is super, and MIIF is net cash, its underlying investments are up to their eyebrows in debt: could affect MIIF’s payouts, NAV and price. But chk out for yrself  http://www.investmentmoats.com/money-management/dividend-investing/amfraser-have-some-seriously-optimistic-cash-flow-projections-for-miif/

For the working stiffs who got cashflow from day jobs. Not for retiree who gambled his cashflow.

 CIMB likes Frasers Commercial Trust I own shume.

Update: DBSV likes FCT too http://sreit.reitdata.com/2012/05/18/fcot-dbsv-3/

DBS bullish on China infrastructure play MIIF

In China, Infrastructure on 29/11/2011 at 6:19 am

In a note dated 25 November 2011, DBS is bullish on MIIF. Interesting as there is current net cash of about S$115 m and  prospective yield of about 10.5% assuming mgt is correct. My previous post in January this year http://atans1.wordpress.com/2011/01/11/miif-unnoticed-china-play/ reflects my concerns about this stock. But it could be I’m wrong, and DBS is correct. Anyway, nearly a year has passed.

International Infrastructure Fund (MIIF) is now leaner, fitter and wholly Asia-focused … MIIF has divested its non-Asian assets, and repaid corporate level loans with the sale proceeds … a cleaner balance sheet with current net cash of about $115 million.

The sale of stakes in other funds also eliminated the black-box problem (assets with limited financial visibility) and the fund now focuses purely on key Asian infrastructure assets.

MIIF’s three key investments

Taiwan Broadband Communications (TBC), the third largest cable TV network in Taiwan;

– Hua Nan Expressway (HNE), a 31 km urban toll road in Guangzhou, China; and

– Changshu Xinghua Port (CXP), a multipurpose port in the Yangtze River Delta region of China.

We visited these …  impressed by the management and operations … fairly confident of steady organic dividend growth from CXP and TBC, though traffic growth at HNE could face some near-term roadblocks. MIIF [has] used its surplus cash (from the sale of prior investments) to increase its stake in TBC from 20 per cent to 47.5 per cent …  higher dividend receipts from TBC.

MIIF paid out a three-cent dividend for FY2010. After restructuring its portfolio, MIIF is now guiding for a dividend per share of 5.5 cents for FY2011, based on expected cash flow generation plus existing cash reserves (2.75 cents already declared for H1 2011). We expect this is achievable and given the healthy implied yield of close to 10.5 per cent at current prices, we are reinstating coverage with a ‘buy’ call and TP of S$0.64, based on a discounted cash flow valuation of underlying assets. The share buyback programme … provides further support …

MIIF: Unnoticed China play

In China, Infrastructure on 11/01/2011 at 5:45 am

Macquarie Int’l Infrastructure Fund has transformed itself into a China play with infrastructure assets in China and Taiwan. In 2010, it sold all kinds of investments like nursing homes in Canada.

It promises to be a Asian infrastructure play.

It’s latest presentation (Nov 2010) says it has 37cents in cash, RNAV of 80 cents a share, and no borrowings at MIIF level. But if it’s share of its investments borrowings are included gearing is 57%. Taz the catch.

Got to find out how its investments are valued and its plans for its cash.

Let you know. Wary as MIIF has been a dog with fleas. And if one annualises its Sept dividend payment, it yields abt 5%. Bit low for trust that was promising gd payouts at IPO time.

MIIF prior to the restructuring showed the problems of the model that Temasek and CitySpring mgt aped. Macquarie group was a pioneer of the model of using lots of debt to buy boring utility assets, and then spinning the assets off into trusts. Investors got income, Macquarie got fees at every level. Then the economic crisis struck and all lost out.

Buying for dividend yields can be dangerous

In Investments on 10/12/2009 at 11:41 am

Just ask the investors in Global Investments ( GIL, the former Babcock & Brown Structured Finance Fund) and Macquarie International Infrastructure Fund Limited (MIIF)

At the IPO price of S$1.06 in late 2006, GIL was offering a yield of 9%, while MIIF’s prospectus in May 2005 stated “forecast dividends delivering an annualised yield of between 7.1% to 9.0% on the Offering Price for the period ending 31 December 2005 (see ‘‘Financial Forecasts — Assumptions’’)”. Its listing price was S$1.

Well GIL (with lots of CDOs in its portfolio) is now around 24 cents, while MIIF is around 43.5 cents.

The saving grace is that both are trading below their latest available NAV calculations. MIIF’s NAV as at Sept is 80 cents down from June’s 86 cents. GIL’s is 36 cents as at September, up from June’s 35 cents.

The moral of these two stocks is that high yields could be a sign that investors need to be compensated for the risk that the dividends are not sustainable and that the stock price would fall. Of course, if one is lucky, it could simply mean that the market got it wrong — the dividends are sustainable and the stock price undervalues the company.

You place yr bets, and leave it to the cards.

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