atans1

If Amos went to a US neighbourhood school

In Uncategorized on 07/01/2016 at 5:28 am

When Amos the Fantastic first came to public attention, an ang-moh-tua kee was quick to say that if ony he were educated in the West, not in S’pore.

I couldn’t help but mentally sneer at the clown and laugh that Amos was really lucky to be in the S’pore education system when I read about life in neigbourhood schools in the US

in South Carolina, where a 16-year-old girl was thrown onto the floor and dragged from the classroom by a police officer after she had refused to stop using her mobile phone. The internet has plenty more such horrors; including footage of a sobbing 5-year-girl in Florida, handcuffed after she threw a hissy fit.

When Bertie Simmons, Furr’s octogenarian principal, took charge in 2000, the school’s cops were running amok. “They were doing things with kids that you’d not believe,” she says. “Like grabbing them, shoving them against walls, cuffing them. I was appalled. You shouldn’t treat schoolkids like criminals.”

http://www.economist.com/news/united-states/21685204-minorities-bear-brunt-aggressive-police-tactics-school-corridors-too-many

Now Amos went to a neighbourhood school in S’pore and these things never happened to him. If they had happened to him, he’d have told us. In fact, it seems that while he was considered a “weirdo'”, “spastic”, “autistic” by other students, and a “troublesome” kid by his teachers, he didn’t get into any really serious trouble when in school.

If he had gone to a neigbourhood school in the US, if he were still alive, he might be too traumatised to behaviour as yaya as a papaya.

Come to think of it, maybe if his neighbourhood school here was as strict as those in the UA, we’d be spared his antics.

What do you think?

Oh, I found out from a mutual friend during the hols that I know Amos’s catechism teacher. He’s now a lawyer in a GLC but at thetime was a partner in a big law firm. It seems Amos once came to class ready to debate that the church was evil, bad etc. He was told that a catechism class was not the appropriate venue for such a discussion and that he shouldn’t turn up for further classes if he no longer wantede to be a Catholic.

Seems he didn’t know what to say.

Going by the way he behaved himself when Dodwell and the other lawyers were representing him, maybe he respects lawyers? Or they know how to handle him?

Update at 4.45pm: After reading http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-06/best-education-system-putting-stress-on-singaporean-children/6831964 , wondering maybe the education system overstressed Amos the Boy Wonder and he’s suffering the S’potr education equivalent of PTSD

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), once called shell shock or battlefatigue syndrome, is a serious condition that can develop after a person has experienced or witnessed a traumatic or terrifying event in which serious physical harm occurred or was threatened. PTSD is a lasting consequence of traumatic ordeals that cause intense fear, helplessness, or horror, such as a sexual or physical assault, the unexpected death of a loved one, an accident, war, or natural disaster. Families of victims* can also develop PTSD, as can emergency personnel and rescue workers.

*Think Mother Mary

  1. Maybe MOE will put SPF NS men in schools to find potential Amoses…

    haha

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: