atans1

What Islamic State and the PAP have in common

In Political governance on 03/10/2016 at 6:05 am

Reading this BBC article http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-37244146 it struck me that Islamic State  (or ISIS) and the PAP share two leadership problems.

Leaders have to multitask

We know that the PAP;s senior leaders have to multitask because of a lack of trustworthy, competent people (Juz look at the potential successors to PM — more below). PM is the PM, Sec-Gen of the PAP, chairman of GIC and chairman of PA.  Teo and Tharman are DPMs and

— Teo is also the Coordinating Minister for National Security and Minister-in-charge of the Civil Service.

— Tharman is the Coordinating Minister for Economic and Social Policies and Chairman of the Monetary Authority of Singapore. Tharman was also covering between May and August Heng Swee Keat’s duties at the Finance Ministry after Heng had a stroke during a Cabinet meeting.

The Minister for Pets is the Law and Home Affairs minister. I mean the welfare of pets and their owners is a full-time job, not like the job of keeping the Indians, Malays and Eurasians happy.

Meanwhile at ISIS

One of the reasons why those leaders held many different roles before their deaths was that the group relied on those it trusted the most to handle its operations.

,,,

Adnani, for example, was the group’s spokesman but also its general emir in Syria and the man in charge of foreign operations orchestrated from Syria, primarily in Western countries.

Another example of IS relying on long-standing leaders to handle several roles was Abu Ali al-Anbari, who blew himself up after US forces ambushed him near the Syria-Iraq border in March.

Before his death, according to a detailed obituary published by the group’s Arabic-language al-Naba newsletter, Anbari had been asked to leave his role as a preacher in his hometown, Tal Afar near Mosul, and take on responsibility for management of IS finances.

At least ISIS has the excuse that finding trustworthy and competent leaders willing to die for the cause is a problem. I mean who doesn’t want be a multi-millionaire?

Both have succession problems

At ISIS, the assassinations by the US have meant

The loss of the old guard is clearly aggravating the group’s problems and might represent the greatest challenge it has faced since the US-enabled uprising against it by Sunni Arabs in Iraq in 2005-6.

Whether the group will survive this transition depends on how far the old guard shaped and defined it.

The transition to the second and third tiers of leadership is already well under way, and the process could affect the overall direction IS takes and the way it operates.

The emerging leaders grew up within the group as it moved from a foreign franchise established by jihadist veterans to a predominantly Iraqi insurgent group, and then back to a hybrid local group with a global agenda.

Many of them also grew up under the US occupation in Iraq and in an environment shaped by sectarian tensions and civil wars.

Meanwhile in the PAP, PM is already talking of the transition to the next generation. Fair enough given his problems with cancer and with his very entitled little sister.

The six candidates to be the next PM are:

1 Heng Swee Keat
2 Chan Chun Sing*
3 Ong Ye Kung
4 Lawrence Wong
5 Ng Chee Meng*
6 Tan Chuan Jin*

(*paper generals three)

Actually the three paper generals should join The Idiots — S’pore (or TISG as it prefers to be known) given their track record. Ong Ye Kung is also a possible candidate for  The Idiots — S’pore. To be fair to The Idiots — S’pore, they’ve had 4 weeks free of major lies or mishaps, a recent record.

Whatever, ISIS would never have recruited these potential PMs if they were Muslim jihadists, even to be suicide bombers. They’d blow up their comrades.

 

 

 

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