atans1

Juz call an ambulance even if these symptoms last only 5 minutes

In Uncategorized on 02/02/2017 at 5:02 am

I’m sure that you know that if you get a combination of these symptoms you should call for an ambulance

— blurring of vision

— room seems to spin

— loss of muscular power

— slurring of speech

— cold sweat

because you could be getting a stroke.

But you may like me think that if one gets these symptoms and they go away almost immediately (say five minutes), everything is OK. Not so.

During CNY a relation related that he had the symptoms last year while fiddling with some gadgets. He “recovered” almost immediately but was still pale when his wife spoke to him. His son was visiting and was called to examine him. He told them to call for an ambulance because he said it was a stroke attack. He’s an authority because he’s a physiotherapist working with stroke patients.

Always call an ambulance. Another attack could come at any time, an attack that if unattended for some time could lead to bad results like partial paralysis. It’s the luck of the draw when another attack will happen and it’s important to get immediate medical treatment to unchoke the system: hence the ambulance.

As it was scans revealed that my relation had had two previous attacks. If he was a cat, he’d only have six lives left.

 

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  1. This is a mini-stroke known as transient ischaemic attack (TIA) where a tiny plague deposit or blood clot blocks a capillary or blood vessel in the brain for a few seconds, but luckily gets dislodged on its own. Symptoms usually resolve after a few minutes or hours. They’re often a precursor to more serious strokes.

    Vast majority of strokes are ischaemic i.e. blockage of blood vessels in brain, and the immediate treatment would be clot buster drugs delivered intravenously. But dosage needs to be titrated carefully to prevent internal bleeding — you don’t want an ischaemic stroke to become a haemorrhagic stroke.

    After that, would need to follow up with brain scans and put on blood thinners and regular blood tests, as well as diet control & exercise regime.

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