atans1

Be “scouts”, not “soldiers”

In Uncategorized on 23/03/2017 at 12:59 pm

Here the term “scouts” means

soldiers or other persons sent out ahead of a main force so as to gather information about the enemy’s position, strength, or movements.

Men like Kit Carson and Buffalo Bill. Google them if u’ve not heard of these white legends who helped make “America Great” by helping exterminate the Amerindians.

Our education system must teach us to be “scouts” not “soldiers” to make S’pore Great again.

At present it’s the other way round: http://ideas.ted.com/why-you-think-youre-right-even-when-youre-wrong/?

“scout mindset,” the drive not to make one idea win or another lose, but to see what’s there as honestly and accurately as you can even if it’s not pretty, convenient or pleasant. I’ve spent the last few years examining scout mindset and figuring out why some people, at least sometimes, seem able to cut through their own prejudices, biases and motivations and attempt to see the facts and the evidence as objectively as they can. The answer, I’ve found, is emotional.

Just as soldier mindset is rooted in emotional responses, scout mindset is, too — but it’s simply rooted in different emotions. For example, scouts are curious. They’re more likely to say they feel pleasure when they learn new information or solve a puzzle. They’re more likely to feel intrigued when they encounter something that contradicts their expectations.

Scouts also have different values. They’re more likely to say they think it’s virtuous to test their own beliefs, and they’re less likely to say that someone who changes her mind seems weak. And, above all, scouts are grounded, which means their self-worth as a person isn’t tied to how right or wrong they are about any particular topic. For example, they can believe that capital punishment works and if studies come out that show it doesn’t, they can say, “Looks like I might be wrong. Doesn’t mean I’m bad or stupid.” This cluster of traits is what researchers have found — and I’ve found anecdotally — predicts good judgment.

The key takeaway about the traits associated with scout mindset is they have little to do with how smart you are or how much you know. They don’t correlate very closely to IQ at all; they’re about how you feel. I keep coming back to a particular quote from Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, author of The Little Prince. “If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up your men to collect wood and give orders and distribute the work,” he said. “Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea.”

In other words, if we really want to improve our judgment as individuals and as societies, what we need most is not more instruction in logic, rhetoric, probability or economics, even though those things are all valuable. What we most need to use those principles well is scout mindset. We need to change the way we feel — to learn how to feel proud instead of ashamed when we notice we might have been wrong about something, or to learn how to feel intrigued instead of defensive when we encounter some information that contradicts our beliefs. So the question you need to consider is: What do you most yearn for — to defend your own beliefs or to see the world as clearly as you possibly can?

As evidence for this thesis look at all the paper generals we’ve had from one Lee to Kee Chui, Tan and Desmond Kwek thru Teo and Yeo.

 

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  1. Examples here would probably include Raffles, GKS, Lim Kim San. Philip Yeo had flashes of the scout mindset in his early years but became more & more dogmatic as the years wore on. As for Old Fart his is general mindset, the ability to think big & willingness to sacrifice large numbers of soldiers’ lives to make it work.

  2. Nice share. You may like this article too.

    http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20160907-how-curiosity-can-protect-the-mind-from-bias

    This is why it is a mistake to think that you can somehow ‘correct’ people’s views on an issue by giving them more facts, since study after study has shown that people have a tendency to selectively reject facts that don’t fit with their existing views.
    … …
    But smarter people shouldn’t be susceptible to prejudice swaying their opinions, right? Wrong. Other research shows that people with the most education, highest mathematical abilities, and the strongest tendencies to be reflective about their beliefs are the most likely to resist information which should contradict their prejudices. This undermines the simplistic assumption that prejudices are the result of too much gut instinct and not enough deep thought. Rather, people who have the facility for deeper thought about an issue can use those cognitive powers to justify what they already believe and find reasons to dismiss apparently contrary evidence.

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