atans1

MRT: Pouring petrol on the waterborne flames of discontent

In Infrastructure, S'pore Inc on 24/10/2017 at 7:11 am

That’s what the chairman of the Public Transport Council did last week, a few days after Khaw, and the chairman and the CEO of SMRT did a pale imitation of Japanese-style apology over the “ponding” problem. 

The Public Transport Council (PTC) will consider the rising cost of maintaining new rail infrastructure as it goes into its annual fare review exercise, PTC chairman Richard Magnus said on Thursday (Oct 19).

Mr Magnus wrote in a blog post, titled Balancing Sustainability and Affordability, that the council “cannot turn a blind eye” to rising costs as it has to ensure the “viability of the public transport system”*.

Read more at http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/fare-review-adds-to-rising-costs-of-public-transport-magnus-9325772

He obviously isn’t singing from the hymn sheet as the other three because the last thing the PAP administration wants, is to remind the commuting public that once the trains run like clock-work again there’ll be fare rises**. (Funny that the trains were on time when ran by a Ferrari-owning FT retailer, who also owned a Mercedes sports, not a paper general.)

Whatever, somehow I think that even if the problems at SMRT and the other MRT lines are fixed by this time next year next year, way before the next general election (latest possible date is in early 2021), there won’t be fare increases until after the general election. (And if the problems ain’t fixed by 2021, I wouldn’t be surprised if PM declares a state of emergency, delaying GE until after the MRT problems are solved.)

Btw wonder who are the

— turkeys voting for Christmas,

— suckling pigs voting for Chinese New Year, and

— the sheep voting for Eid al-Adha,

in the focus groups that tell the PTC that “fares are affordable”. Must be the die-die must vote PAP PAPpies.

————————————————

*The report contined:

He detailed the cost of investments in public transport, such as the new Downtown Line and bus contracting subsidies.

The Government’s investments in new rail infrastructure will cost S$20 billion over the next five years, and comes on top of S$4 billion to renew, upgrade and expand rail operating assets, he wrote. Another S$4 billion will be spent on bus contracting subsidies over the same period.

“While these investments are a necessary part of the Government’s push to improve the public transport experience, they raise operating costs and impose a heavy cost burden on taxpayers,” he said.

**Chris K, no fan of the PAP, points out that by first world-standards, public transport fares are low. Funny on this pro PAP occasions, he doesn’t point out that salaries here are not Swiss standard. Btw, his FB wall is becoming the home of TRE’s cybernuts. Comments by the likes of Albert Tay and Es Nolan could have come TRE cybernuts like Oxygen and Rabble-rouser. Chris K will steal eat the lunch of TeamTRE. He doesn’t ask them for funds.

  1. I must protest LOL! Put it even better than usual – “However, why is it that comparatively low fares are considered something of a burden to the public? The issue lies way beyond the simple matter of a failing mass rail system. It is the same issue why many think even public housing is unaffordable if not for CPF. It lies in the notion that a supposedly world class economy has less than world class wages and far less than world class benefit system so that every additional call on disposable income becomes a burden. Don’t even mention that supposedly low tax rates isn’t what they are cranked up to be, at least not to those who earn a median salary and below.”

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