atans1

Ravi not taking his medicine again?

In Uncategorized on 14/07/2019 at 10:18 am

Update on 15 July at 4.30 pm:

“We have informed the court at the Pre Trial Conference this morning that the case is being withdrawn. We would like to wish the couple the very best and will pray for recovery,” the lawyer wrote.

M Ravi’s FB post

Law Society should investigate if he was professional negligent in filing the suit, in addition to find out if he’s taking his medicine.

——————————————————————————–

Recently, Ravi got back his practicing certificate. He can now practice law: a mixed blessing for an unfortunate couple he’s doing pro bono work, as I will explain.

But first when he got back his cert, I had high hopes for him because he gave an interview to the constructive, nation-building media in which for first time ever he admitted openly that he had gone bananas and apologised to those he had hurt (physically or mentally). (M Ravi apologises for assaults after pleading guilty and Shameful silence as M Ravi’s cows come home)

This was a first because after he recovered from his two previous maniac spells, he refused to talk about his illness, even though he had gone bonkers in public, causing rows. He even sued the Law Society, but now he thanked the Law Society.

I was happy for him because even if I tot he was a BS of a lawyer, I admired his courage (JBJ’s real son?)

Well reading this extract from TOC (about a husband trying to use his CPF to pay for his wife’s cancer treatment when she’s terminally ill: even the doctors treating her say it’s unlikely she’ll survive), it’s clear Ravi’s had a relapse and should not have got back his cert:

CPF Board savings withdrawal policy restricted to recipients aged 55 and above “mindboggling” and “irrational”: Suriia’s lawyer M Ravi

M Ravi had previously raised several concerns regarding his client’s case.

Firstly, he argued that Section 18(d) of the CPF Act allows a CPF member to transfer a portion of his fund from the Ordinary and Special accounts to his loved one’s account. However, according to the CPF Board’s policy, the money can only be transferred to someone who is 55 years of age and above.

“Now, to me, this policy is irrational. A policy which is irrational in the administrative law sense becomes unlawful.

“In other words, what the CPF Board is saying is that although they are sympathetic to the fact that Sarojini is suffering from 4th stage cancer, she has to wait until she turns 55 for Suriia to transfer the money, with the Board’s consent, from his account to Sarojini’s Medisave account.

“To me, this is mindboggling and to say the least, it rankles the soul,” said M Ravi.

The human rights lawyer also argued that the CPF Board’s policy deprives Sarojini of her right to life under Article 9 of the Constitution of the Republic of Singapore, which stipulates that “no one should be deprived of his life or liberty in accordance with the law”.

M Ravi had consequently filed a Mandatory Order to the court “to compel the CPF Board to allow” Suriia “to transfer to his wife, portion of his CPF funds to her” on Wed (10 Jul).

“Suriia also seeks a Declaration from the court that the CPF Board’s policy made pursuant to Section 18D of the CPF Act is unlawful and unconstitutional, insofar as it prohibits the transfer of funds from Suriia’s Ordinary and Special accounts to his wife Sarojini’s Medisave account,” he added.

I won’t bother rebutting this nonsense* except to say lawyers who know and like him think he’s bonkers in his reasoning.

This

The human rights lawyer also argued that the CPF Board’s policy deprives Sarojini of her right to life under Article 9 of the Constitution of the Republic of Singapore, which stipulates that “no one should be deprived of his life or liberty in accordance with the law”.

reminded me that I once upon a time wrote

M Ravi’s grandfather’s parliament, is it?

Will M Ravi’s barrage of constitutional challenges change anything?

M Ravi kanna “brainwashed” by ang mohs?

Btw, fyi:

Understanding M Ravi’s bi-polar disorder

An inconvenient fact for M Ravi’s groupies

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Added after publication

*A reader, a fat cat doctor turned bizman explained

 [Y]ou’re allowed to transfer your CPF to your loved ones’ accounts, after setting aside the BRS (or 1/2 of the old Minimum Sum with property pledge).

If you’re below 55, you can transfer your remaining Ordinary Account.

If you’re above 55, you can transfer your remaining Ordinary plus Special Accounts.

He then added:

Under most other state pension plans elsewhere in the world, they wouldn’t even be able to utilise any part of it for medical / insurance expenses. And no “refund” of pension savings due to terminal prognosis (which the wife got back all her CPF OA & SA in cash).

Ok ok, in angmoh countries, she would qualify for maybe disability welfare and perhaps also free medical. But the big caveat is that such free or heavily state-subsidised medical is restricted to their govt medical system & hospitals, which are either no better & often worse than Singapore’s govt medical system.

And they are not into govt hospitals …. they are using Mt E & PCC.

Another funny thing is how they claimed the private specialists mentioned that she can be treated, but when interviewed by MOH, the private healthcare providers stated that her condition is incurable.

Knowing how vested & fucked up the private healthcare industry is, I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s a “difference” in “opinions” being conveyed to the patient, but in this case it shouldn’t be because the private medical certified her case as “terminal” i.e. death expected within 12 months, in order for her to get CPF to give her back her OA & SA.

  1. Since LKY was in diapers (well at least since I knew about it in 2000 anyway), you’re allowed to transfer your CPF to your loved ones’ accounts, after setting aside the BRS (or 1/2 of the old Minimum Sum with property pledge).

    If you’re below 55, you can transfer your remaining Ordinary Account.

    If you’re above 55, you can transfer your remaining Ordinary plus Special Accounts.

    Seriously speaking, CPF is already TOO flexible as a retirement savings plan (thus explaining a lot of its deficiencies in that aspect).

    Under most other state pension plans elsewhere in the world, they wouldn’t even be able to utilise any part of it for medical / insurance expenses. And no “refund” of pension savings due to terminal prognosis (which the wife got back all her CPF OA & SA in cash).

    Ok ok, in angmoh countries, she would qualify for maybe disability welfare and perhaps also free medical. But the big caveat is that such free or heavily state-subsidised medical is restricted to their govt medical system & hospitals, which are either no better & often worse than Singapore’s govt medical system.

    And they are not into govt hospitals …. they are using Mt E & PCC.

    Another funny thing is how they claimed the private specialists mentioned that she can be treated, but when interviewed by MOH, the private healthcare providers stated that her condition is incurable.

    Knowing how vested & fucked up the private healthcare industry is, I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s a “difference” in “opinions” being conveyed to the patient, but in this case it shouldn’t be because the private medical certified her case as “terminal” i.e. death expected within 12 months, in order for her to get CPF to give her back her OA & SA.

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