atans1

Interesting, relevant, little known facts about HK’s general strike

In China, Hong Kong on 06/08/2019 at 10:35 am

Strike brings Hong Kong to a standstill as political crisis deepens

Transport network crippled and flights cancelled as police clash with protesters
FT Headline

It went on

Advertising and banking employees joined construction and retail workers to take part in Hong Kong’s first general strike in half a century, showing how anti-government sentiment is now building among professionals.

There were the usual clashes and the use of tear gas by the police.

Here’s some facts that are not well known but relevant in analysing the situation in HK

There hasn’t been a general strike [in Hong Kong] since the 1960s when the Beijing-controlled unions called the strikes,” Antony Dapiran. He has written a book on the history of dissent in HK. So if the West is really behind the protests as Beijing alleges, cannot isit? Juz retaliating ler.

A HK conglomerate (Secret Squirrel tells me HK Special Branch tells him it’s the Jardine Group) said via an unofficial but authoritative spokesperson that employees who choose not to come to work on Monday could count it as a “work from home”. Seems Swire Group also had a similar policy. Both are British Hongs.

The local HK conglomerates (Cheung Kong, Hutch etc) juz said nothing as they hope not to upset Beijing, the HK govt, or their HK employees.

An HSBC spokesman said: “We respect that our employees have their own personal views on political and social matters. Our priorities are the safety of our employees and supporting our customers.”

A 34-year-old HSBC bank employee said the bank had not officially sanctioned the strike on Monday but some managers had told staff verbally they would not be penalised for not coming to work.

FT

Remember that HSBC includes the Hang Seng Bank which has a lot of branches serving the people: the takeover of Hang Seng Bank was the start of HSBC becoming a global bank: HSBC, Superman and another Cina superhero.

StanChart, Citi etc kept quiet hoping not to upset Beijing, the HK govt or their employees.

Btw, HSBC’s retail business holds billions of dollars in deposits in HK, and has a leading position in mortgages: both may suffer if instability worsens.

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