atans1

Typical Chinese reaction to “brownface” ad/ Cina also can get upset

In Uncategorized on 07/08/2019 at 11:41 am

If you are familiar with the comments made (Letter to ST’s Forum) skip it and read the rest of my piece. Promise you it’s worth reading.

When I first saw the “brownface” advertisement, my initial reaction was that it was a rather interesting (and perhaps even intelligent) advert, in that it was trying to show that whether we are Chinese, Indian, Malay or Eurasian, deep down we are the same, as the same person was used to portray the different races (Why depicting ‘brownface’ characters is no joke, Aug 3).

I also thought, by using the same character, the message was that in Singapore, even though we may be of different races, fundamentally, we are the same people and, therefore, should be united and be treated the same.

It does not matter if a person is Chinese, Malay, Indian or another race. It is always possible to construe a message in different ways.

A simple statement like “this dish is interesting” can be interpreted to mean it is unique, it is something which I will not want to try again, or it is tasty.

I just wonder if the (silent) majority of Singaporeans may have thought that the advert was quite innocuous.

I also wondered if perhaps the reason the same person was used was for cost saving?

Joseph Tan Peng Chin

Above appeared in ST’s Forum on Monday

I agree with the writer and so do many other Chinese (including TRE readers) going from their comments when TRE used Indian lady takes issue with charge that Nets ad was “brownface”.

But I have to disagree with the writer that the casting had to do with cost. I’ll explain in another post why.

When I sent https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-49205225 to a FB friend, he asked me what did two of these three links in article had to do with S’pore

I told him that the two showed that ethnic Chinese could be thin-skinned and as vicious as the Nairs.

Finally, from a bunch of Yale-NUS College students

In the past week, Singapore has been ablaze with controversy and debate over the brownface Mediacorp ad campaign and the police investigation into the rap video response by Preetipls and Subhas. As a community of students concerned with Singapore’s civil democracy and racial discourse, we at CAPE are disappointed by the knee-jerk reactions of censorship and blind condemnation, instead of discourse and a sincere attempt to understand and reflect upon the experiences of racial minorities in Singapore.

CAPE presents a primer of 6 infographics reflecting on racism as more than just some “western SJW thing”, discourse versus censorship, and questions to ponder with the state planning an enhancement of current judicial firepower in regulating race and religion.

(Of course they have to be PC: their grades depend on it. I’ll critick the piece some other time.)

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