atans1

Talking about race: something from the FT

In Uncategorized on 10/08/2019 at 6:54 am

As it’s the day after National Day, let’s return to the issue of race which is the hot topic

Alt media, cybernuts also promoting racial stereotyping and worse

Typical Chinese reaction to “brownface” ad/ Cina also can get upset

Indian lady takes issue with charge that Nets ad was “brownface”.

Brownfacegate: Did you know Shanmugam also said this?

(Btw, racism in the US of A: Why Muslims in USA are right to feel oppressed)


How the concept of a “Malay race” can cause a headache

“Malay race” created by ang mohs, not the Malays

Academic talking cock/ Got such thing as “Malay” race meh?

Watain fans: Muslims cannot be, but can Malays be ?

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Charles King, a professor of international affairs and government, in his latest book, Gods of the Upper Air.

traces three main waves of western thought about race. Before the 19th century, academics viewed different races as permanently distinct, akin to separate species. After the work of Charles Darwin introduced the idea of evolution, a second idea gained traction: that humanity was interlinked, but that different societies were evolving at different rates; thus societies were ranked according to how “primitive” they were.

Boas, Mead, Benedict and others initially accepted this evolutionary consensus and went to places such as the Arctic Circle and Samoa, aiming to study “primitive people” and fit them into an evolutionary schema. But after observing different cultures first hand, they realised that it was totally wrong to label other cultures as “primitive”. Different human cultures needed to be valued and studied on their own terms, as part of the “great arc of potential human purposes and motivations”, Benedict wrote. She described this third approach as “the recognition of cultural relativity” — or the idea that different human cultures were valid in their own right, and should be respected.

These ideas were largely drowned out during the second world war, as fascism and nativism held sway. But in the postwar decades, they helped form the bedrock of human rights.

Whatever, ang moh tua kee.

Trebles all round.

 

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