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Primer on Yields of Reits & Biz Trusts

In Investments, Reits on 12/12/2011 at 5:57 am

The u/m is an extract from a BT article written by Teh Hooi Ling. Senior Correspondent and CFAer, published on 3 December 2011. It gives some very interesting insights on the yields offered by the various types of Reits, shipping trusts and other business trusts*. (Note some bad news for shipping trusts) 

Thanks BT,  Ms Teh and the unnamed fund manager, “Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year”.

For investors who are keen on Reits and other business trusts, here is some advice from a fund manager friend on how to go about picking the right ones.

Industrial properties usually have 30-year leases, or 30+30. Assuming a 30-year lease, it means it depreciates at a rate of 3.3 per cent pa, versus one per cent pa for a 99-year lease for a retail or commercial building. So the yields for industrial Reits have to be up to 2.3 per cent pa higher than retail or commercial Reits. Usually however, it is less due to the time discount factor.

‘Ships are usually scrapped after about 25-30 years. I think typically they are depreciated over 15 years or so. Even if ships are scrapped after 30 years, shipping trusts should command a higher yield than industrial Reits because the ship lessee can ‘disappear’ with the ship, but not the industrial building tenant.

‘Hospital Reits like Parkway Reit is a rare breed as its revenue is based on a consumer price index formula. You can think of it as having zero vacancy rate (but the main issue is counterparty risk). So given the same counterparty risk, it should trade at a lower yield than retail Reits, which should trade at lower yields than commercial Reits, given the same tenure (because it’s easier to lease out retail units).

‘In turn, commercial Reits should trade at lower yields to industrial, which should trade at lower yields to hospitality (as vacancy rates of hotels/service apartments can be quite high during recessions).

‘Hospitality Reits should trade at lower yields to shipping.

‘But note that industrial can trade at higher yields to hospitality as the former has shorter tenures.

‘As for Hutchison Port Holding Trust and SP Ausnet, I would value them as companies rather than Reits, as usually the rates they charge are prone to fluctuations – unlike Reits and shipping trusts which usually lock customers up for years.

‘SP Ausnet is not structured even as a business trust and pays its dividends out of net profit rather than cash profit. I think every year, it pays out the same dividend per share even though its earnings fluctuate. I would value it the same way I value SingPost.’

Note that unlike a company, a Reit cannot maintain payouts if it hits a bad patch because, at least, 90% of net income has to be paid out. While this is not true of biz trusts, their attraction is that they promise to pay out most of their free cashflow. Companies usually pay out only a portion of their net income, hence there is something in reserve, if they hit a bad patch, and dividends can be maintained for a while more. Hence the importance to investors of what analysts call “dividend cover” which shows how many times over the net income could have paid the dividend. For example, if the dividend cover was 2, this means that the firm’s profit attributable to shareholders was two times the amount of dividend paid out. Not true of Reits, and biz trusts. Got problems, payouts get cut.

*Related post: https://atans1.wordpress.com/2011/12/10/reits-and-business-trusts-similarities-differences/

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Why owning Reits in a rising interest rate environment may make sense

In Financial competency, Property, Reits on 09/01/2014 at 4:46 am

When ST talks down Reits, as it has been recently, because interest rates are rising, it’s time think again. Remember its big-balls up when Reits were at their (with hindsight) their peak in May last yr?

Here’s some stuff that appeared in reference with US Reits but is applicable here: While REIT investors did an about-face following the Fed’s tapering announcement, some industry experts say all the attention surrounding interest rates and REITs is unfounded. “Ever since May 22, there’s been this discussion about the role of interest rates in REIT returns – and it’s a very strange discussion,” said Brad Case, VP of Research with the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts (NAREIT) in a recent interview with CoStar News. “Because the truth is, when interest rates go up, it usually means the economy is strengthening. That’s good news for REITs and means that returns will be strong.” In support of this statement, Case pointed out that REITs have performed well in 12 out of 16 periods of interest rate increases since 1995.

But be prepared that they underperform other types of “shares”

While there is controversy regarding the degree to which interest rates affect REITs, Affleck pointed out that investors need to consider more than just how REITs perform when interest rates change. “The relevant measure is not whether REITs have done well during interest rate increases, but how they performed relative to the broader market,” Affleck said. “On that count, the data are definitive – REIT performance relative to the broad market is inversely related to interest rate movements.” Affleck added that REITs outperformed the broad market – gaining 27% compared to a 20% gain for the S&P 500 – when interest rates fell from 3.5% in March 2011 to 1.5% in April 2013.

Juz take the payouts and bank them. But remember that Reits, unlike shares, pay out most of the income they get.When things go wrong (higher borrowing costs, lower rents), payouts suffer. No buffer, unlike comnpanies dividends. In the worse case, can end up having to subscribe to rights issues because Reits don’t have reserves to draw on in hard times.

Related post: https://atans1.wordpress.com/2011/12/12/primer-on-yields-of-reits-biz-trusts/

Remember ST’s “promotion” of Reits in May & June?

In Financial competency, Reits on 03/09/2013 at 5:09 am

ST wrote last Saturday about S-Reits as follows, In short, this means that you would have got a better deal if you had bought in 2010 and 2011, compared to now.

However, buying now would still be better than if you had bought in May this year: At that time, the average yield of the sector was as low as 4.3 per cent, Bloomberg data shows.

http://www.cpf.gov.sg/imsavvy/infohub_article.asp?readid=493433871-18886-1315537690

Regular readers will know that in late May (here), two weeks in a row in June (here and here), I grumbled about ST’s “promotion” of Reits, saying it wasn’t the time to load-up on Reits.

As to whether to load up on Reits, I’m thinking about it. Let you know after I buy some, Or if I decide not to.

Related post: https://atans1.wordpress.com/2013/07/08/why-im-not-selling-my-reits-yet/

If you are blur about why the yields of different types of reits are different, read this https://atans1.wordpress.com/?s=Reits+%2B+primer. BT is not ST.

DBS Vickers likes Cache Logistics Trust, Suntec Reit and CapitaRetail China Trust, saying that “most of the negatives are already priced in” for these counters.

It also likes hotel owner CDL Hospitality Trusts, though technically, the vehicle is a stapled security rather than a pure Reit (ST report)

Investing in Reits

In Investments, Property on 02/01/2011 at 5:29 pm

BT published a long piece that could serve as a primer on how to invest in Reits. Reit Primer.

Two complaints abt piece.

One is that it doesn’t talk abt buying Reits that trade at big discounts to latest reported RNAV. True there may be gd reasons why some Reits trade way below RNAV. But savvy investors can make $ buying Reits that they think shld not trade way below RNAV and holding them until they trade above or juz below RNAV, while getting good payouts while waiting. Useful Reit table for yields and RNAVs.

Those who bot Ascendas India Trust (trumpets pls) when it was trading way below its RNAV have made gd capital gains. I should have sold  out but the yield is pretty decent.  And India is now hot and RNAV could rise.

The other complaint abt the piece is that Reits can use the low interest environment to refinance their debts at lower rates and for longer tenures. Analysts from DBS and OCBC are saying this is happening.

BTW, high-yielding Reits  courtesy of ST scan0004. Declaration of interest: I own units in three of them. (Update on ^ January 2010: Now own four of them.)

Update on 4 January 2010

Must read — a summary of Soro’s piece (many yrs ago) on the danger of buying a Reit trading above RNAV (and attraction).

Another gd Reit table.

Strategy for 2012: Same as in 2011

In Financial competency, Financial planning, Investments on 05/01/2012 at 5:54 am

Go buy stocks that pay good, sustainable dividends https://atans1.wordpress.com/2011/08/12/a-broker-who-almost-got-it-right/

BTW same as for 2010 https://atans1.wordpress.com/2009/12/31/investment-strategy-for-2010/

Also read

https://atans1.wordpress.com/2011/12/12/primer-on-yields-of-reits-biz-trusts/

https://atans1.wordpress.com/2011/01/02/investing-in-reits/

https://atans1.wordpress.com/2010/11/10/high-yield-low-pay-out-stocks-are-best/

https://atans1.wordpress.com/2010/08/24/buying-for-dividends-know-the-cos-balance-sheet/

https://atans1.wordpress.com/2010/06/30/buying-for-dividends-diversify-too/