atans1

Archive for the ‘Internet’ Category

AI robots already in charge

In Internet on 23/06/2019 at 9:43 am

Artificial intelligence is already so deeply embedded in our lives that we don’t notice it according to Amy Webb, a professor of strategic foresight at New York University’s Stern School of Business and author of “The Big Nine: How the Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity”.

We juz don’t notice it “because we mindlessly use it every single day as we like and share stories, send emails and texts, speak to machines and allow ourselves to be nudged,” she says.

Don’t believe her? FB’s automated “M suggestions” claims more than 100m people interact it with each month.

Btw, the 9 are Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, IBM and Apple from the US of A, and .Baidu, Alibaba and Tencent from China.

 

 

Amy Webb

 

Advertisements

Temasek, GIC got this right in our backyard

In GIC, Indonesia, Internet, Temasek on 22/06/2019 at 6:01 pm

Indonesia is really the place to be in e-commerce.

And Temasek is there: Indonesia: Temasek, Google & McKinsey singing from the same page

As is GIC via Bukalapak: an e-commerce unicorn: https://techcrunch.com/2019/01/18/bukalapak-raises-50m/

Btw, Go-Jek where Tenmasek has a stake has big plans in Thailand and Vietnam, as does Grab (where Temasek also has a stake).

 

 

PAP cares for S’poreans, really they do: Look at Save the Children’s Global Childhood Report

In Internet on 17/06/2019 at 2:02 pm

(Part of an occasional series)

About two months ago, TOC, other cybernut publications, social media cybernuts and even a ex-wannabe IB member* living in Finland on welfare were up in arms over the constructive, nation-building MSM’s reports on S’pores top ranking in the Save the Children’s Global Childhood Report.

I was wondering why they were upset until I read in the FT recently

Reasons to be cheerful Singapore is the top country for taking care of its children, according to Save the Children’s Global Childhood Report. More children all over the world are surviving past their fifth birthday than at any time in the last twenty years; more than ever before eat well enough to avoid stunting; more are in education; and more are safe from violence.

The PAP govt in the alternative but parallel universe these anti-PAP types live in cannot do anything gd for S’poreans. So when reality intrudes, they get upset and fake the news. Why? Read Terry Xu and cybernuts are really PAPpies


*He and ex-ST wannabe Seth Lord turned wannabe Jedi, its alleged wanted more than going rate to be part of IB but were allegedly told off to bugger off because mothership was better than them and wasn’t demanding as much money as them. He had to migrate to Finland, his wife’s country, because that’s the only way his kids can have a good but free education. In S’pore, they could only make it to “Every school a good school” neighbourhood school. And, the parents couldn’t afford to send them to the int’l schools here.

Interesting post: How to make a school good?

Streaming — S’pore tua kee

In Internet on 15/06/2019 at 1:50 pm

In Asean

What TOC doesn’t tell about “victim” it’s championing

In Internet on 14/06/2019 at 1:55 pm

Further to Fake news the TOC way/ History is very complicated, TOC, cybernuts juz plain jealous isit? and Why TOC’s Danisha Hakeem is a menace to the credibility of alt media, here’s more on how TOC does fake news.

A Singaporean man, who is a retired teacher and a well-known musician, is suing Malaysia’s Immigration Department for RM2.67 million over his 37-day detention in an over-crowded and badly-maintained cell.

Puis Gilbert Louis, who will turn 68 next month, said that his nightmare started when the immigration officers raided his house in Johor Bahru on 9 October 2018 and arrested him.

Based on his statement of claim filed by his lawyer Arun Kasi, the man who owns a valid visa to be in Malaysia until 2 November 2018, was in the house with four other individuals, and one of them was his female friend from the Philippines who also holds a valid visa.

However, the additional three people in the house were friends of his Filipino friend and he is unaware of their origin or their immigration status.

TOC

What TOC doesn’t tell us is that Gilbert Louis has a history of violence against others that  he claims were caused by an ISD-inplant. In particular, he was jailed for six yrs for assaulting his then-wife’s lawyer. She wanted a divorce but he claimed that the lawyer instigated the divorce: so he beat up the lawyer (a lady, I think).

He also has a history of mental illness, although he denies that there’s anything wrong with him. He says the ISD fixes him via the implant: This fan should join Ravi in Woodbridge.

 

 

Fake news the TOC way/ History is very complicated

In Internet on 11/06/2019 at 11:24 am

Last week, TOC and its fellow anti-PAP cybernuts discredited themselves thrice over with the voters the Oppo needs to win over in any general election (the PAP voters who voted for Tan Cheng Bock in PE 2011 who but for TKL, Goh Meng Seng and Tan Jee Say would have been president: really fixing the PAP).

TOC, using Vietnamese and Cambodian state media reports (Vietnam did not invade Cambodia as claimed by PM, these reports screamed) as their source material, pictured PM as getting his history wrong. The cybernuts went into overdrive dissing PM’s lack of knowledge of the “liberation” of Cambodia by Vietnam.

When the complicated truth emerged on cyberspace, showing that TOC and friends were propagating fake news, TOC and the cybernuts changed tack. They then said PM should not have upset the people of Vietnam and Cambodia with his comments. Example:

Sivakumaran Chellappathere was absolutely no need to mention what he should know clearly to be a diplomatic minefield. He could of course have had continued to maintain his stand on that matter without ever mentioning it.

When this didn’t wash with the target audience, they changed the conversation accusing those who disagreed with their view of history of calling them “traitors” (There were some PAP nutters, the PAP version of TOC and cybernuts, using the  “t” word, but not enough to tar people like me who disagree with TOC’s and the cybernuts’ view that Vietnam liberated Cambodia): when they were juz patriotic S’poreans who believed in the truth.

Truth, what truth? Their truth was to swallow uncritically what the Vietnamese and Cambodian state media said. Why are they so uncritical of the state media of really repressive regimes? Because these media attack the PM and his PAP govt? (Related post “Licking the ass of the enemy of my enemy”)

Calvin Cheng got it about right when he posted on FB

I wonder why so many anti-Government people are willing to take the side of foreigners, during this storm in a teacup regarding PM Lee’s remarks on Vietnam and Cambodia.

The issue is actually very simple.

Did Vietnam invade Cambodia?

Yes.

Whether you invade to liberate (Current Vietnam and Cambodian point of view) or invade to set up a puppet Government (the prevailing view then), it’s still an invasion right ?

Why is Vietnam angry?

Because they don’t want to be called invaders.

Why is Cambodia angry ?

Because PM Hun Sen was one of the 7 central committee members in the pro-Vietnam Government that Vietnam set up. If he admits it’s an invasion, then he is a collaborator with invaders. So he can never say it was an invasion, but rather he was a Cambodian patriot who came to power with Vietnamese help.

Did the Vietnamese invasion stop a murderous regime, that of Pol Pot?

Yes.

But if the international community back then allowed Vietnam to invade Cambodia to overthrow the Khmer Rouge on the basis of ‘liberation’, what was to stop communist Vietnam from invading Thailand to liberate them from the bourgeoisie capitalists ? And then Malaysia? And then Singapore?

That’s why ASEAN had to oppose it on principle. Even if the consequences in Cambodia were benign.

Who says choices in international relations are easy ?

Finally, why did PM Lee mention it when writing a condolence note for Thai Gen Prem?

Because that was one of Gen Prem’s biggest achievements – staring down the Vietnamese across the border and opposing them, knowing that his country could be next.

So that’s a simple summary of the issues.

No need to write long op-eds and posts to over-complicate.

Just silly opportunists looking to obfuscate, confuse, and to make people angry with PM Lee.


When I said Calvin Cheng was a dickhead

Riposte to Calvin Cheng’s defence of UA

Calvin, Amos & other cyber-vermin: the global perspective

Why MLC has to talk about Calvin

When I agreed with him

When being a minister turns from a calling into a job for life

Kee Chiu Cybernuts who want to migrate to Bangladesh

HIV data leak: Calvin Cheng is right again


All in all, TOC is proving to be a better friend of the PAP then even TKL, TJS and Meng Seng. TOC is a really useful idiot. or maybe Terry and his TOC team are as mad as M Ravi, when he’s not taking his medicine? More evidence that being anti-PAP is bad for yr mental health

SingPass technical support versus that of OCBC and HSBC

In Banks, Internet on 11/06/2019 at 7:00 am

But first, HSBC is boosting the headcount of its wealth management team in Asia. The focus is here, where the banks says it will launch new digital initiatives this year.

The bank should ensure that staff are trained in PR as well in the technical details. I have e-banking accounts with OCBC and HSBC. The OCBC staff are not that good in technical support as the HSBC staff, who really know their stuff. But when it comes to telling client about the features, the OCBC staff are really great.

As for SingPass support, what can I say? I had another bad experience yesterday. Gal hadn’t a clue. Worse gal never called back despite promising to call back later in the day: still waiting. Btw, a tech mole helped me solve the problem I had, a problem caused by the SingPass system. I’ll provide details later this week.

But for now, I can use SingPass: no thanks to the staff or the system.

Related post:  SingPass sucks, really sucks (Cont’d)

SingPass sucks, really sucks: Saga continues

In Internet, Public Administration on 10/06/2019 at 7:17 am

I have yet to receive my new one-time password, despite KPKBing last Monday and doing the necessaries: SingPass sucks, really sucks (Cont’d)

But to be really fair, Wednesday was a public holiday, and SingPass promises a response within five working days. If by this evening, I don’t get my password via the post, I go KPKBing tomorrow morning. Doubtless Singpost will be blamed.

SPH, MediaCorp can cull another 90% from their newsrooms

In Internet, Media on 06/06/2019 at 1:28 pm

Juz use Radar (Reporters and Data and Robots). Stories generated by the semi-automated news agency often make the front page of local newspapers in the UK, FT reports.

Given that most of our constructive, nation-building media’s reports are copy and paste of the PAP govt’s and its agencies, or corporate releases, do we really still need that many zombies?

SingPass sucks, really sucks (Cont’d)

In Internet, Public Administration on 03/06/2019 at 5:25 pm

Further to SingPass sucks, really sucks (where I explained that I was given an invalid one-time password by SingPass to reset the password of my dormant, unused SingPass account) when I called the SingPass call centre this morning, what I was told had my blood pressure up to 180/100.

I was told that I could not have been given the password I was given because it was all numeric: it should be alpha numeric. I was then told that it would take another 10 days before I could use my SingPass account. Of course, it was explained, I could go down to the Marine Parade SingPass counter and sort the issue out on the spot: which defeats the purpose of a digital nation, doesn’t it?

The Chinese (local or M’sian, I’m not sure) gal could also not answer my question, “What assurance do I have that the single-use password I will given again, is not rubbish: like the one sent to me?”

I demanded to talk to someone more senior. It took 10 minutes before someone dared pick up the phone. The Malay lady who came to my assistance assured me (after receiving my reset request digitally), that there should not be a mistake this time in the password provided (Let’s wait and see) and that by next Monday, I should be able to use SingPass to do stuff (Let’s wait and see). I also found out that one-time password can be all numeric.

Says a lot about quality of staff training, that I was given wrong info.

Morocco Mole (Secret Squirrel’s sidekick) assures me that his second cousin removed working in SingPass tells him that a true-blue anti-PAP cybernut working in IT forgot to ensure that when the password was sent to me that the system would accept it. Has happened before because the cybernut spends almost all his working time reading TOC, TRE and The Idiots, and posting comments on these sites.

 

SingPass sucks, really sucks

In Internet, Public Administration on 02/06/2019 at 7:18 am

I ‘ve been making the move to the e-age. I’ve activated or setup e-banking systems (Tot of finally voting for the PAP govt because of the free (so far) same day funds transfer) etc.

As a final step, I decided to reactivate my SingPass. As I had forgotten my password, I applied for and got a new one-time password so that I can reset my password.

Guess what? Earlier this morning, I tried to log in with the SingPass given password. Cannot get in.

I wasted half an hour retrying (maybe my typo mistake or I went to wrong login page). Called call centre and it only works during office hrs.

Got to wait until Monday morning to sort out what went wrong at SingPass’s end. I think someone didn’t change the password.

Li Hongyi got a lot to do before he is PM material. And grandpa and GCT didn’t set the bar very high for Hongyi’s pa did they?

Data protection the PAP way

In Internet, Public Administration on 01/06/2019 at 10:42 am

S’pore has begun a public consultation on proposed changes to its Personal Data Protection Act.

There are also proposed changes to allow a business to use personal data for business innovation purposes without needing consent.

FT quotes Anne Petterd, a principal at Baker McKenzie Wong & Leow, a law firm

Data protection? What data protection?

Related post: Welcome to S’pore: Mall BSing on data protection law

Achtung! Cybernut mind at work

In Internet on 29/05/2019 at 11:22 am

When TRE republished in part* Why PAP should juz ban Facebook, there was this comment on a comment that had me smiling:  the emphasis is mine.

why should TRE report?:

TRE also never report:
TRE also never highlight LHY son’s same sex marriage in S africa, at least evening chinese newspaper reported.

all things, humans or animals, as long as not pap, are good things.

since Mr Lee Hsien Yang is not pap, WTF is there a need to report?

things worth reporting are lky clown prints lying cheating and lky clown prints wife lying cheating and lky clown prints sons daughters gays lesbians.

as long as not pap, no need to report since it is ok.

as long as it is pap, must report since it is NEVER ok.

ffff. wake up. this is 21st century 2019 pap corrupted Singapore.

This

as long as not pap, no need to report since it is ok.

reminded me of what I recently wrote

Today the PAP and the constructive, nation-building media believe that if it isn’t reported, a fact doesn’t exist.

Sad that ), and other anti-PAP paper warriors believe the same.

The PAP has won.

Terry Xu and cybernuts are really PAPpies

*It omitted my links to other related posts (which I included because they gave a lot of background info on the topic), but I’ll let this incident go without KPKBing. I had given permission to reproduce my pieces in full. If TeamTRE members wanted to omit or edit anything, they should check with me, not suka suka do what they like. But as they are really hard working people who provide a service to a bunch of ingrates, I’ll let this pass, this time.

Why PAP should juz ban Facebook

In Internet on 26/05/2019 at 11:13 am

Facebook users are the problem, not fake news.

Research by the Oxford Internet Institute found that that individual junk news (as it defined) stories were more likely to be shared on Facebook than the work of mainstream news organisations. While mainstream news was more visible, stories from junk news sources proved far more engaging. In English, for example, the average junk news story got four times as many likes and other Facebook interactions as a story from a professional news organisation.

The study was done across seven languages ahead of the vote in recent EU elections.

Reference: https://www.bbc.com/news/business-48345260

Related articles:

Fake news is magic

Fake news?

The one-party state and fake news

Why the PAP is really afraid of Facebook?

Silencing fake news and inconvenient voices: two sides of the same coin

Fighting fake news while raising revenue

What is “news”?/ “Fake news” is not “fake” says Harvard expert

Where US has to buy from China

In China, Internet on 25/05/2019 at 2:35 pm

Many Chinese surveillance cameras are fitted with artificial intelligence including facial recognition technology, and some can read simple faces, or can estimate age, ethnicity and gender.

There are more than 170 million surveillance cameras and the country has plans to install a further 400 million by 2020.

 

Terry Xu and cybernuts are really PAPpies

In Internet, Media on 22/05/2019 at 3:02 pm

(Alternative title: “Why TOC and other anti-PAP sites never reported HK MRT trains’ collisions?”)

After I wrote TOC: A lot of bull

(where I reported that Terry had revealed that he employed foreigners to write for TOC because they were cheaper than true blue S’poreans, a lot cheaper)yesterday, I remembered another example where TOC and Terry behaved like PAPpies, not talking about news that diverts from the “right” view. TOC (and to be fair, otheranti-PAP alt media sites) didn’t tell S’poreans that a few months ago there was a very serious incident on HK’s MRT: shumething that never ever happened here.

Two subway trains have collided during a new signal system test in Hong Kong, halting services and threatening travel disruption for millions of commuters.

The incident occurred between the Central and Admiralty stations before the service was open to the public early on Monday morning.

Rail officials warned that repairs were likely to take “quite a long time”.

Network operator Mass Transit Railway (MTR) said sections of the Tsuen Wan Line had been suspended and urged commuters to avoid the route affected and to use other forms of transport if possible.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-47607676

Looks like Terry’s and other anti-PAP types brains are like that of the PAP: when the public doesn’t know a fact, that fact never exists. Their readers will have no doubts that the our MRT system sucks when compared to that of HK’s.

Actually even with this HK cock-up, the HK system is a lot better. So why didn’t the anti-PAP publications not report the accident?

In 2011, I analysed a senior PAPpy’s and his team’s unhappiness with a TOC report.

[T]hey must believe in an 18th century philosophical theory that is now treated as a forerunner of the concept of “subjective idealism”. One Bishop Berkeley argued that there are no material objects, only minds and ideas in those minds. He summarised his theory with the motto “esse est percipi” (“To be is to be perceived”). In modern PR-speak, this translates into,“Perception is reality”, one of the major tenets of the PR and public communication industry.

This theory of “Perception is reality” is best summarised in the following example he gave. If a tree in a forest falls, but no-one sees or hears it fall, has it fallen? Berkeley argues that it has not fallen. It is still standing.

An example in the S’pore context would be that S’poreans were not aware of how close the voting would be on polling day in 1988 in Eunos GRC and in Cheng San GRC in 1991. The mainstream media did not report the sentiment on the ground in these two GRCs, so S’poreans were not aware that many S’poreans were unhappy with the PAP. The unhappiness did not exist because it was not reported.

https://atans1.wordpress.com/2011/08/01/%E2%80%9Clittle-disappointment%E2%80%9D-tony-tan-to-toc/

In Silence of SMRT, LTA & MoT explained,I wrote the following about Traingate

SMRT, the LTA and MoT kept quiet because they like Bishop Berkeley believe that “Perception is reality”. So long as the public did not know that there were cracks in the 26 China-made trains, and that the trains had been returned for repairs, there were no train cracks. There were no cracked trains because If a tree in a forest falls, but no-one sees or hears it fall, has it fallen? Berkeley argues that it has not fallen. It is still standing.

What they still don’t realise that in this age of social media and the internet where many people walk around with smartphone cameras, If a tree in a forest falls, someone will see it or hear it fall. And tell others about the falling tree, after taking a selfie beside the fallen tree.

This being the case, disclosure of problems or cock-ups, not cover-ups or silence should be the best (and default) policy for the authorities and corporations They should assume that news of the cock-up or problem will become public knowledge and that by disclosing, the news agenda can, hopefully, be controlled..

But in one-party states, silence or cover-up are the default options, not disclosure. And this is the weakness of one-party states where people carry smartphone cameras. The one-party state will, in time, be undermined.

Ban smartphone cameras PAP? After all internet access for public servants will soon be restricted in this wired, connected nation.

Today the PAP and the constructive, nation-building media believe that if it isn’t reported, a fact doesn’t exist.

Sad that ), and other anti-PAP paper warriors believe the same.

The PAP has won.

 

 

 

Did Hali ask Xi for this app when they met?

In China, Internet on 16/05/2019 at 11:15 am

Hali’s welcome by the Chinese reminded me that the Chinese have an app that will help Heng and other 4G leaders keep S’pore a one-party state, like China:

—  Keeping power in a one-party state

—  Would this happen in a one-party state?

Seriously, like China, S’pore is concerned about terrorists. An app is being used in Xinjiang to keep China safe from the coreligionists of Hali and TRE’s bapak (Note bapak not Bapak).

—————————————————

bapak not Bapak

Btw, Morocco Mole, Secret Squirrel’s sidekick, told me that his second cousin removed working in the ISD alleges that TRE took down its republication of Watain ban: playing the easily offended game can backfire when it was threatened with suicide denial of service attacks by Jihadist Jills and Joes from bapak’s harem. (note bapak not Bapak.) Seriously, they told TRE that the first paragraph was so offensive and could get TRE into trouble with the law. Well, the original article still stands despite Harder Truths saying he’d report me: lying as usual. Or maybe, I got good ISD connections?

———————————————————

According to Human Rights Watch, predictive policing in Xinjiang comes in the form of a smartphone app, with access to data about citizens’ religion, travel history, family connections and more. Those deemed suspicious by the algorithm may potentially be taken into custody. Sounds a good thing to have in the war against terrorism.

But according to human rights activists (They not scared of being bombed or knifed is it?) this app represents a deeply disturbing scenario in which government repression and mass surveillance intersect because itpulls down data from mobile phones to build up encyclopedic knowledge of those it tracks in China.

Fake news is magic

In Internet on 12/05/2019 at 1:46 pm

Here’s an interesting extract on why fake news works even when we know it’s fake news

Magic is about manipulating our perceptions, “exploiting cognitive loopholes,” says Dr Kuhn – and understanding how magic works is being recognised as having wider implications.

“Misdirection” is a key part of magic – getting people to not look at what’s important, but to distract them, change the subject, use a dramatic prop and push their attention elsewhere, so they do not see what is happening in front of their eyes.

It’s being used to to examine areas such as road safety, says Dr Kuhn, looking at how to make sure drivers can really focus on what’s important.

“How do people fail to see something even though they are looking at it?” he says.

Fake news
It’s also applicable to bigger social and political questions, he says, such as how to respond to “fake news” and false information on social media.

The lesson of magic, says Dr Kuhn, is that even if something is recognised as false, it still makes an impression and steals our attention, and researchers are looking at how understanding magic can help to investigate the world of conspiracy theories and fake information.

.This is where someone thinks they are choosing a card at random, but the magician is really manipulating their decision and the “choices” are false.

“Free will is an illusion. People are much more suggestible than they think. All of our perceptions are very malleable,” says Dr Kuhn.

This suggestibility and use of false options can be misused in a political sense, he says.

https://www.bbc.com/news/education-47827346

Don’t believe me? Read more at Fake news?

proposed law against fake news narrows, not widens, the Government’s powers, the Ministry of Law said on Thursday (May 2).

Or

The one-party state and fake news

Silencing fake news and inconvenient voices: two sides of the same coin

Fighting fake news while raising revenue

What is “news”?/ “Fake news” is not “fake” says Harvard expert

 

“There is freedom of speech, but I cannot guarantee freedom after speech”

In Internet, Political governance, Public Administration on 11/05/2019 at 10:59 am

Did Minister Shan say this?

No. But he could have and still may soon. Or some other minister may say it, if Shan is taking a break, because this is the philosophy behind the new law. Ministers can publish corrections alongside claims about public institutions that it deems false. Those who publish false statements with “malicious intent” face criminal sanctions, including fines of up to S$1m and jail sentences of up to 10 years.

Don’t believe me? The law differs from laws against the spread of misinformation in other jurisdictions, which typically focus on taking down problematic content from online platforms.

Still don’t believe me? Read The one-party state and fake news where I quoted from Fake news law: Ownself judge ownself

The problem about lies or “fake news” is who gets to decide what is or is not a lie or “fake news”.

In liberal democracies, even the president of the US cannot get his view of what is or is not a lie or “fake news” accepted by even a majority of the voters. There’s some sort of consensus (“conventional wisdom”) driven (manipulated?) by the elites and media about what is or is not a lie or “fake news” in which facts often play an important part.

In a one-party state (de facto or de jure) the ruling party decides what is or is not a lie or “fake news”

— Keeping power in a one-party state

— Would this happen in a one-party state?

— Coldstore: Why Harry’s narrative or the highway

The planned tackling of “fake news” is a smokescreen for muzzling further netizens, not juz cybernuts. The internet and social media has made it a lot easier for S’poreans to share facts, ideas, and criticisms of the way we are governed by the PAP.

— Minister wants his cake and eat it/ PAP doesn’t get the Internet

— Ingratitude, uniquely S’porean? Blame the internet? Not really

— Us Netizens: Comancherios of the Internet?

This freedom (relative) to share facts, ideas, and criticisms of the way we are governed by the PAP worries the PAP (juz like the CCP worries about the internet and social media in China), hence the plan to further muzzle the internet and social media.

was said by Idi Amin

a Ugandan president best known for his brutal regime and crimes against humanity while in power from 1971-1979.

Idi Amin – Facts, Life & Uganda – Biography – Famous Biographies

Where we don’t Pay and Pay

In Internet, Telecoms on 10/05/2019 at 1:41 pm

 

S’pore is between Nigeria and Brazil at US$3.24 based on data from https://www.valuechampion.sg/are-singaporeans-overpaying-their-mobile-plans

Vote wisely.

 

 

 

Fake news?

In Internet, Political governance, Public Administration on 08/05/2019 at 1:22 pm

proposed law against fake news narrows, not widens, the Government’s powers, the Ministry of Law said on Thursday (May 2).

Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/online-falsehoods-bill-pofma-fake-news-narrows-government-powers-11496172

The article goes on

The Law Ministry’s Ms Teo reiterated the point …. that that the powers to be given to the Government under the Bill, and the public interest grounds on which the Government can exercise its powers, “are actually narrower than the Government’s existing powers”.

“In key areas, the Bill narrows, rather than extends, the Government’s powers,” she said in the letter that was also provided to CNA and published in the Straits Times.

But as has been pointed out by the public

[The] proposed law is also broad and vague in how it can and will be implemented. Clarifications and amendments are needed to make it more focused on its real purpose.

FB post

And

But more clarifications and more amendments might mean more restrictions which the G is not willing to impose on itself.

If and how the G reacts to criticism will be very telling on where its comfort zone is.

Another FB post

Related posts:

The one-party state and fake news

Why the PAP is really afraid of Facebook?

Silencing fake news and inconvenient voices: two sides of the same coin

Fighting fake news while raising revenue

What is “news”?/ “Fake news” is not “fake” says Harvard expert

 

 

S’poreans overwhelming trust PAP govt over fake news bill

In Internet on 30/04/2019 at 12:23 pm

That’s my take after

Nas: 2000, Terry: 200+

The KPKBing about the so-called draconian effects of the pending law on fake news in cyberspace and social media is really, juz “noise”, if only 200 plus S’poreans turned up at TOC’s rally against the bill last Sunday.

NAS’s crowd the previous Saturday at his”S’pore’s a great place” would amount to 24,000 in a city in the UK or 120,000 in the US, while TOC’s crowd last Sunday amounted to 2,400 or 12,000 in the US. (How calculations made: Pink Dot: Why was govt spooked?/ Pastor Khong try matching the numbers)

The masses have spoken by their absence, voting with their absent feet: so progressives and their cybernut allies should sit down and shut up. .

So cut out the BS, anti-PAP progressives and their anti-PAP cybernut allies, especially those ranting on TRE, social media and TOC.

As I wrote last Sunday before Terry’s do:

Whatever, if the progressives and their cybernut allies cannot muster a decent crowd of about 1,000 people, time to sit down and shut up, and stop talking down to the 70% of the voters who vote for the PAP at GEs. They should be trying to persuade those who voted for Tan Cheng Bock at last PE (35% of voters) that they are right, rather than juz diss the PAP.

The law of politics:

You either have the numbers or you shut up.

(Tito Mboweni, ANC freedom fighter who became cental bank governor, finance minister and corporate fat cat)

Nas v Terry Xu

No wonder TOC jealous of Nas: TOC, cybernuts juz plain jealous isit?. But to be fair to TOC: TOC recovering from its anti-Nas fever.

Btw, Nas not only FT who thinks S’pore is a great place.

 

TOC recovering from its anti-Nas fever/ Why TOC keeps on making “honest mistakes”?

In Internet on 23/04/2019 at 11:06 am

Further to TOC, cybernuts juz plain jealous isit?, I was about to KPKB that TOC was becoming xenophobic citing as evidence its nasty comments on Nas, especially harping that he’s a foreigner. Doesn’t sound like the Terry I know.

But I changed my mind when TOC responded to this on FB

Another foreigner telling us how good our Gahmen is. Just what we need…..
VTO

by saying

I need to defend Nas on this. He actually answered it very well in his reply to a question posed by a member of public. The guy from Pakistan who is based in Singapore, asked if Nas will be talking about the good and bad in Singapore, since he is settling down here for the time being.

Nas said that he recognises that he is still a foreigner in Singapore and it is not his position to tell what is good and what is bad but he tries to bring out the best of whatever he gets in touch with. Will put up the video of that if I can.

The problem is that audience of his videos, think that he can cover all aspect of a matter within one min and if he says it is good, means nothing is wrong.

(Sounds like Terry of Terry’s Online Channel, not one of his goons.)

commented
Good to see that TOC is recovering from it’s anti-Nas bout (that almost became xenophobic fever). I suppose Kirsten Han’s article helped the recovery.
Readers will know that I’m no fan of Kirsten Han but she got this right:
Nas Daily might not be playing politics—I seriously doubt he knows that much about Singaporean politics, anyway
She went on
—but the PAP is
Obviously, she doesn’t believe
Nas Daily fan meet a ‘non-cause based’ event, Public Order Act permit not required: Police
Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/nas-daily-fan-meet-a-non-cause-based-event-public-order-act-11462242
But then she wouldn’t believe anything the S’pore govt or any govt agency says, would she? To be fair, if an ang moh publication like NYT or the Guardian says that the PAP govt is right, she’d agree thru gritted teeth: she is one of those ang moh tua kee types. Read this if you want to know more about what else she said: https://www.kirstenhan.com/blog/2019/4/19/tfw-its-not-actually-about-nas-daily?fbclid=IwAR2PCtBGdK9kunMTEbC_5jM-Z42q1tJ4YpS02kH_vr4KnNo0qKuvsMmWLTo
Sad that cybernuts active on social media can’t distinguish between Nas and the PAP govt, and attack him personally when they should be focusing their attacks on the PAP govt for using him (as they perceive it) for its own agenda (as they perceive it). But with enemies like the cybernuts, the PAP doesn’t need friends. For that many S’poreans are grateful.
Whatever, Terry should investigate why his team keeps making “honest mistakes”, this year:
Maybe some ISD or PAP operative working in TOC is giving Terry and others the wrong pills or slipping drugs into their drinks. But most likely, Terry and his team need to consult Dr Ang Yong Guan. They could be going nuts.

More evidence that being anti-PAP is bad for yr mental health

Spending too much time in TRELand is bad for one’s mental health

He’s expensive. But I’m sure, he’ll give a hefty discount to comrades still fighting the good fight. For the record, he’s not retired from the good fight: juz resting between general elections?

 

TOC, cybernuts juz plain jealous isit?

In Internet, Tourism on 20/04/2019 at 11:36 am

I couldn’t help laughing when I saw this headline from Terry’s Online Channel: “Why is a controversial foreign blogger allowed to organise a massive gathering at the Botanic Gardens?”

I laughed even more when I read

Why is a foreign vlogger who has consistently stoke controversy allowed to involve himself in Singapore’s domestic issues? Doesn’t Singapore have law specifically designed to prevent that foreigners from influencing local social and political issues?

This is pure BS from TOC: nowhere in the TOC rant does it give details of

— how he involves himself in Singapore’s domestic issues; or

— how he’s influencing local social and political issues?

TOC is juz publishing fake news.

NAS’s juz a guy organising a do for his fans, and hoping to use them as props for his next mega dollar video, as far as I’m concerned.

And Terry Xu and TOC is not happy that S’poreans can have a bit of fun, while helping a FT make money.

TOC has explained its KPKB

No, seriously the question is whether a video is considered political when it is negative and when it is positive, it is not. Because by answering that question, you can realise what is political and what is not, particularly under Singapore’s govt’s definition.

FB comment on the article

Go read the article again and tell me if it got across that point. It didn’t. It was rant against an FT. The comment was damage control.

Btw, the sliming continues, TOC posted a copy of his Israeli passport and told us he can’t go to M’sia because of it. What has this to do with the price of eggs?

To be fair to Terry and his bunch of TOC idiots, a lot of anti-PAP types are expressing their unhappiness on FB and other social media.

What a bunch of kill-joy born losers. And juz because Nas said some nice things about living here. I mean after all there’s lot of free things here: Fake News: S’pore is Pay And Pay/ Truth: Plenty of gd, free stuff.

These grumpy, anti-PAP losers should organise an anti-Nas protest or a protest against all foreigners who say nice things about S’pore (After all if they hate Nas because he says nice things about S’pore, they must hate all foreigners who have nice things to say about S’pore) at Hong Leong Green and see how many people turn up.

Btw, I’m no fan of Nas but I know people who enjoy his stuff. Live and let live.

TOC and other anti-PAP types have scored an own goal on this issue. And they keep wondering why the PAP keeps winning?

 

 

BSing academics protected from fake news law?

In Internet on 19/04/2019 at 10:34 am

OMG. Our local academics can continue producing fake news without getting into trouble.

But let me begin at the beginning. On 11 April, 83 academics (only two based here, although there were 30 over S’poreans based overseas) signed a letter of concern about the proposed Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act (POFMA). They sent it to the education minister*.

In a public reply, the education ministry assured academics that the proposed law will not affect academic work. The group behind the letter, Academics Against Disinformation, said that they are unable to accept that assurance from the Ministry until it is reflected in the language of the bill.

Here’s what I posted earlier about our very own local academics producing fake news:

Local academics propogate fake news?

Our brown-nosing constructive nation-building academics presented at the recent Select Committee hearings on Deliberate Online Falsehoods,

an alarming scenario of disinformation campaigns launched by foreign actors bent on attacking the island state, of cyber armies in neighbouring Malaysia and Singapore working as proxies for other countries in undermining national security.

Did they produce any evidence?

But the actual examples of fake news which have come up during this national debate have mostly been prosaic; a hoax photo showing a collapsed roof at a housing complex, which sent officials rushing unnecessarily to the scene; and an erroneous report of a collision between two trains on the light rail transit line.

As the BBC reporter wrote

Irritating and worrying for some, for a while, but hardly likely to bring Singapore society to its knees. In any case both Singapore and Malaysia already have plenty of laws capable of penalising false, inflammatory or defamatory comment.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-43637744

So, as far as I’m concerned the row on Coldstore between PJ Thum and our brown-nosing constructive nation-building academics is “The unspeakable in pursuit of the uneatable!” (Re Oscar Wilde)

Or  “A plague o’ both your houses!” (Shakespeare)

Btw, have to tell u that the reporter also said

It also gave Singapore academics and officials an opportunity to snipe at the US belief in free expression, the “marketplace of ideas”, which had allowed the abuse of personal data on Facebook to take place, in contrast to Singapore’s “better safe than sorry” belief in a more tightly regulated society.

Thinking about it, it’s reasonable to conclude that our academics (save two) didn’t sign the letter because they know they are producing BS aka fake news. Our local academics can continue producing fake news without getting into trouble.

Among academics in Singapore, it is an open secret that work is circumscribed by the government’s desires. At conferences and workshops, academics awkwardly and regularly “joke”, tilting their heads to glance over shoulders, about their remarks being heard by “the government”. Students and younger scholars regularly ask if they should avoid certain topics because of “sensitivities”.

https://newnaratif.com/…/eaaab05200f0645e4451f748dc85ef7a

Since you have read this far, you may be interested in

Why the PAP is really afraid of Facebook?

Silencing fake news and inconvenient voices: two sides of the same coin

Fighting fake news while raising revenue

What is “news”?/ “Fake news” is not “fake” says Harvard expert

—————————————————-

*The letter outlined concerns over the law, in particular POFMA “will have unintended detrimental consequences for scholars and research in Singapore and for the global academy”. The letter went on to say that that the Act “discourages scholars from marshalling their expertise in precisely the areas where it is most needed – namely, pressing questions and challenges for which there are no clear answer or easy solutions”.

 

The one-party state and fake news

In Internet, Political governance, Public Administration on 18/04/2019 at 7:57 am

In Why I no ak the Select Committee hearings on Deliberate Online Falsehoods in April last year, I wrote about the above. I tot that as this is the season about

disaster and even death as the doorways for redemption. It’s about apparent failure and ultimate success. It’s about vivid appearances and unsuspected realities.

Tom Morris

, I’d resurrect the piece given that a very draconian law is going to be enacted soon (Fake news law: Ownself judge ownself)

The problem about lies or “fake news” is who gets to decide what is or is not a lie or “fake news”.

In liberal democracies, even the president of the US cannot get his view of what is or is not a lie or “fake news” accepted by even a majority of the voters. There’s some sort of consensus (“conventional wisdom”) driven (manipulated?) by the elites and media about what is or is not a lie or “fake news” in which facts often play an important part.

In a one-party state (de facto or de jure) the ruling party decides what is or is not a lie or “fake news”

— Keeping power in a one-party state

— Would this happen in a one-party state?

— Coldstore: Why Harry’s narrative or the highway

The planned tackling of “fake news” is a smokescreen for muzzling further netizens, not juz cybernuts. The internet and social media has made it a lot easier for S’poreans to share facts, ideas, and criticisms of the way we are governed by the PAP.

— Minister wants his cake and eat it/ PAP doesn’t get the Internet

— Ingratitude, uniquely S’porean? Blame the internet? Not really

— Us Netizens: Comancherios of the Internet?

This freedom (relative) to share facts, ideas, and criticisms of the way we are governed by the PAP worries the PAP (juz like the CCP worries about the internet and social media in China), hence the plan to further muzzle the internet and social media.

In a recent FB post, I commented that I can see the good of getting Lim Tean and Goh Meng Seng (Meng Seng: fake news propogator) off the air: Chris K that my view was the equivalent of thinking the SS were right to kill everyone in a village when a few SS troops were killed nearby. He has a point.

Since you have read this far, you may be interested in

Why the PAP is really afraid of Facebook?

Silencing fake news and inconvenient voices: two sides of the same coin

Fighting fake news while raising revenue

What is “news”?/ “Fake news” is not “fake” says Harvard expert

Local academics propogate fake news?

 

Three cheers for TOC

In Internet on 15/04/2019 at 1:45 pm

TOC’s Correspondent has done a very gd piece. He and TOC should do more of this kind of factual stuff, and less of the anti-PAP BS aka fake news. There are a lot of inconvenient facts that a few clicks of the mouse can reveal. Don’t juz BS, juz do the searches.

Massive cost overrun in infrastructure projects in Singapore in recent years

Yes, I’ve been hard on TOC, Terry and “Correspondent”

Terry and his Correspondent taking wrong pills again

Cybernuts can relax: TOC resumes normal anti-PAP service

TOC now part of constructive, nation-building media?

but it’s because I know they are capable of doing better than juz mindlessly attacking the PAP, or mindless praising it (Wah lan! TOC praises PAP govt).

 

How Microsoft is subverting China

In China, Internet on 14/04/2019 at 10:48 am

We read a lot in reputable Western media about how China is attempting to subvert Western liberal democracies. But we don’t hear there about how the US (the Europeans, Antipodeans, Canadians and Japanese juz roll over and play dead ) is striking back, or that China may actually be only defending itself against US subversion.

TrumpLand is using a tactic that Sun Tzu would approve: providing tools to enable lazy, unpatriotic, entitled young Chinese tech workers to demand shorter working hours.

FT headline:

China tech worker protest against long working hours goes viral

Online campaign against working 9am-9pm six days a week hits nerve with youth

It reported that the Chinese organisers are rallying support via a project on GitHub, the Microsoft-owned collaboration platform for coders and developers. The project is called 996.icu, because by working 9am-9pm, six days a week , as the English version puts it, “you might need to stay in an Intensive Care Unit someday”. They insist this is not a political protest.

The movement is being organised by volunteers on collaborative platforms — primarily Microsoft’s GitHub, used for code-sharing, as well as Slack, used for messaging. Both are US tech cos.

JD.com said in response to media reports of employees complaining that their 996 schedule was a way of forcing resignations, “We will not force employees to work overtime, but we encourage everyone to fully invest themselves.” Define “fully invest themselves” please.

Workers of China unite against Chinese tech giants and Make America Great Again.

What our alt media can learn from Sweden

In Internet on 11/04/2019 at 4:36 am

Dagens Nyheter the leading Swedish newspaper was losing money. It’s now profitable again.

Since taking charge in 2013, editor-in-chief Peter Wolodarski, encouraged his reporters and editors to view the social media platforms as sources for ideas and stories.

Its journalists then do what most social media users are unable to do

[U]se the grist from social media to badger politicians, question police departments, pose awkward questions to business leaders, and set fresh ideas in a broader context. Scanning social media also allows editors and reporters at Dagens Nyheter to pay close attention to the way their stories echo through their online communities.

FT

FT also reported that Dagens Nyheter is now offering products and services to its readers.

It offers an SKr11,495 electric bicycle emblazoned with the newspaper’s name (150 sold in the first week). It is also running two chartered train journeys through Europe at SKr25,000 per person (the 680 places sold out within a week).

Maybe TOC and other alt media publications can pick up ideas from Dagens Nyheter: especially setting fresh ideas in a broader context (not juz repeating “PAP are always wrong”, and organising trips. They could organise trips to failed one-party states like Venezuela or Cuba, dysfunctional democracies like PeenoyLand or India, or prosperous democracies like Taiwan and NZ.

 

Indonesia: Temasek, Google & McKinsey singing from the same page

In Indonesia, Internet, Temasek on 05/04/2019 at 1:18 pm

Only Indonesia is outpacing India digitally, according to McKinsey.

No wonder Temasek sees a bright future for e-commerce in the region.

In a report in November [2018], Google and … Temasek calculated the value of south-east Asia’s internet economy at $72bn in 2018.

Previous reports by the pair have predicted a regional internet economy worth $200bn by 2025, but last year they raised that projection to closer to $240bn.

“… south-east Asia’s internet economy hit an inflection point in 2018. Powered by the most engaged mobile internet users in the world, industries like ecommerce, online media, online travel and ride-hailing grew at an unprecedented rate,” they wrote.

“Investors have taken notice, pouring record amounts of funds into the region — now it’s time for everyone else to pay attention.”

FT

Temask has stakes in Indonesian start-ups Go-Jek and Warung Pintat (retail tech start-up). Grab where Temasek has an investment is a rival to Go-Jek in Indonesia.

Silencing fake news: even SPH has concerns

In Internet, Media on 04/04/2019 at 11:02 am

Further to Silencing fake news and inconvenient voices: two sides of the same coin, when even the constructive, nation-building SPH is concerned

In a submission to Parliament, Singapore Press Holdings, the country’s largest media organization, warned that a broad interpretation of “fake news” could could lead to “fears among citizens about freely expressing their opinions or engaging in robust and constructive debates, or even to self-censorship by news outlets wary of falling foul of the law.”

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/04/02/asia/singapore-fake-news-intl/index.html?fbclid=IwAR22aU_0W-3Io4sCj03lopodZMWnS_95xaYgRcknGGIJkgdMI2KPlw4PQAg

, PAP voters who voted for Tan Cheng Bock as president should be concerned about the coming law’s powers to ministers: Fake news law: Ownself judge ownself.

Here’s something I came across sometime back, but can’t remember where:

Removing content is not the only way to shape our minds; the most powerful censorship tactics are those we never see – for good and ill.

The coming laws on fake news is nothing more than an attempt to ensure self censorship, something S’poreans are very good at, even Goh Meng Seng, for all his fake news skills:

Meng Seng: fake news propogator

What Meng Seng and TOC don’t tell us about dispute with Tun

“Licking the ass of the enemy of my enemy”

Fake news law: Ownself judge ownself

In Internet, Public Administration on 03/04/2019 at 5:08 am

Or in posh English, not Singlish, “In the proposed fake news law, ministers are judge and jury.”

This is a seriously good reason concerned about the proposed bill introduced on Monday, which gives the government very sweeping powers in the name of regulating fake news propogators like Goh Meng Seng and TOC’s Danisha Hakeem.

My main concern is that it makes ministers the initial (and in most cases the final and only) arbiters of truth about claims regarding the PAP government’s performance: “Ownself judge ownself”.

That is most unfair and unnatural because it makes a minister the judge and the jury in his own cause. Worse although there is some sort of a right of appeal, the burden of establishing the truth lies on the appellant, not the minister. I do not think a minister should have the power to regulate comments made about them or their department in the same way as the government having the power to regulate hate speech or even seriously offensive speech against race or religion.

There is an obvious potential for serious conflicts of interest here, like “Ownself check ownself”.

Silencing fake news and inconvenient voices: two sides of the same coin

In Internet on 24/03/2019 at 6:15 am

TOC accused (rightly) The Indians Idiots Sg of unprofessional behaviour even though TOC should be careful of throwing stones since it’s living in a glass house: ST etc can make the same accusation (rightly also) against TOC: Tweedledum v Tweedledee or TOC v The Idiots Sg.

This row reminded me how the PAP govt can kill two birds (fake news and dissident views) with one stone.

This is how to screw alt media without appearing to be repressive: make use of the fear of fake news.

Egypt’s Supreme Council for the Administration of the Media was given the power to block websites and social media accounts with more than 5,000 followers if they publish “fake news” or incite people to break the law.

The watchdog will also be able to fine them up to 250,000 Egyptian pounds ($14,500; £10,900) without obtaining a court order.

BBC report

OK, OK, the Egyptian way is too crude. What do you expect of paper generals not real ones? The Egyptian army loses to desert nomads in the Sinai. Only good for coups.

Here’s the British way: according to a UK government report, technology groups should be forced by a new regulator to ensure their platforms distribute quality news.

Our ang moh tua kees cannot in all honesty oppose such a law because it comes from the UK: they lick ang moh’s liberal ass, thinking what comes out is manna from heaven.

Seriously, if this law is passed here, Terry’s Online Channel, The Indians Idiots, Goh Meng Seng etc can no longer appear on Facebook given the unreliability of their original reporting and plagiarising of the local MSM. They can’t even copy and paste accurately.

Especially Meng Seng. When he recently pontificated “I am only the supporter of truth based on facts”, I couldn’t help laughing. Surely, he must mean “I am only the supporter of lies based on mistaken, spurious, apocryphal, fanciful, mendacious, untruthful, fictitious, deceptive, concocted, fallacious, incorrect, inaccurate, wrong, sophistical, casuistic, Jesuitical, misleading, delusive, imaginary, illusive, erroneous, invalid, deceiving, misrepresentative, fraudulent, trumped-up, facts”? As evidence, I cite Meng Seng: fake news propogator and What Meng Seng and TOC don’t tell us about dispute with Tun.

Related posts:

Why TOC’s Danisha Hakeem is a menace to the credibility of alt media

TISG: “useful loudhailer” for PAP administration

“The Idiots — S’pore” keeps on promoting divisiveness?

Sad.

Tweedledum v Tweedledee or TOC v The Idiots Sg

In Internet on 23/03/2019 at 6:02 am

 

What I find funny after reading Terry Xu’s Fb post (See below) is that I’m sure ST and other constructive, nation-building publications can say the same thing about TOC notwithstanding Terry’s holier than The Idiots attitude in his last paragraph.

Terry Xu should let sleeping dogs lie seeing that TOC cast the first stone (towards ST many yrs ago) a long time ago. Btw, I think I got grounds to KPKB yesterday to Terry about hypocrisy based on his comments about attribution. But as I know his writer and him, and respect what they are doing (most of the time) and because of the pressures that Terry faces in fighting the Dark Side , I’ll not talk further about the matter: let sleeping dogs lie etc etc.

Having said all this, The Indians Idiots are scumbags:

— TISG: “useful loudhailer” for PAP administration

— “The Idiots — S’pore” keeps on promoting divisiveness?

And this TOC writer (Why TOC’s Danisha Hakeem is a menace to the credibility of alt media) should move to The Idiots. He’s their kind of writer.

Anyway, Terry Xu posted on FB yesterday

After hearing complaints from my writers about how articles have been republished by The Independent SG with no attribution, I decided to take up my complaint with the publisher of the website.

Referring to the writer who has been doing that, I wrote, “It is fine if articles are written with reference to TOC’s site but if you refer to the months of postings, I have seen nothing of such. Can you please see that this behaviour stops?”

He replied, “Dear Terry, We have a ‘do-not-touch-TOC-content’ policy in place. Hence, I’m surprised that you are making such claims. In any case, all authors do declare their source for each piece they are working on and my editors do check for copyright infringement, attribution and accuracy. It may very well be the case of the newsmaker talking to two outlets at the same time. In which case, there is really no need to attribute to TOC.
In any case, if my writers do use your content. You can be rest assured that we’ll credit TOC for it. Chill my friend. We’re in the same space. Need to look out for each other.”

My response to that was to throw a series of articles.

http://theindependent.sg/in-what-capacity-did-ivy-ng-sign-…/

http://theindependent.sg/grassroots-leader-who-constructed…/

http://theindependent.sg/mothership-draws-flak-for-story-o…/

http://theindependent.sg/survey-shows-only-59-per-cent-of-…/

http://theindependent.sg/mainstream-media-speculates-that-…/

and noted that these articles are for just the month of March.

He then asked for the corresponding articles from TOC that were published.

Which I gave,

https://www.theonlinecitizen.com/…/ivy-ng-signed-documents…/

https://www.theonlinecitizen.com/…/grassroots-leader-who-c…/

https://www.theonlinecitizen.com/…/mothership-highlights-l…/

https://www.theonlinecitizen.com/…/survey-35-think-heng-ca…/

https://www.theonlinecitizen.com/…/media-speculates-former…/

Note that all the articles from TISG is after TOC had published its, even the screenshots are using the ones that TOC had posted. I haven’t yet included the articles that are based on the video write ups posted on TOC’s Facebook page.

In response to the claims, the publisher has replied, “Dear Terry, after careful examination and consideration, we find your claims to be baseless and unfounded.”

UPDATE: The publisher even accused me of backdating the articles! Hello… I can’t backdate Google News, even if I want to.

So case closed it seems and business as usual. Nothing I can do about it, I suppose? And how can you be friends with such people?

Clarification: As I tell my staffers, there are a few type of articles.
– Opinion pieces
– Govt release
– News of events
– Public knowledge
– Exclusive investigative articles

We do not credit MSM for govt releases because it should be public knowledge in the first place and Govt don’t release them on their public site only after MSM has reported on it. News event, we sometimes don’t because we are pissed that only IMDA certified press are invited.

But if you do read our other posts, we mention clearly it is from the MSM that we are taking the quotes from and also we would correct when journalists from MSM write to us.

China’s emerging fintech giant

In Banks, China, Insurance, Internet, Investment banking on 21/03/2019 at 1:53 pm

But first, why China is great again: Chinese insurer Ping An once had HSBC as a large shareholder but is now the largest shareholder in HSBC.

Besides insurance, it’s into banking, securities broking, asset management and has a trust biz.

In recent years Ping An has invested heavily in the development of new technologies including artificial intelligence, facial recognition and cloud computing.

So it’s becoming a tech co, like Goldman Sachs (At least that is what ex-CEO claimed that is what Goldie is).

Wah lan! TOC praises PAP govt

In Internet, Public Administration on 18/02/2019 at 10:46 am

I kid u not.

Singapore has one of the top education systems in the world. Singapore’s education system supports the development of children’s strengths and social skills. Schools in Singapore produce students with strong academic results who later go on to pursue successful careers.

https://www.theonlinecitizen.com/2019/02/14/school-fees-in-singapore-most-expensive-affordable-schools-in-singapore/?fbclid=IwAR3tHIEHXEwgJS6JrXknD3U1rEOlQjHfjqj_xHJ_MYxB_1BnHlKDOl-40m4

What next? Terry’s Online Channel will tell S’poreans to vote for the PAP?

Or is this juz an “honest mistake” by TOC? The usual anti-PAP propaganda will resume soon once Terry takes his medicine?

 

Why the PAP is really afraid of Facebook?

In Internet on 10/12/2018 at 4:39 am

Yellow vest protests ‘economic catastrophe’ for France

(BBC headline)

The PAP is trying to intimidate Facebook not really because of fake news but because Facebook can be used to turn sheep into wolves.

Much has already been written about the anti-Muslim Facebook riots in Myanmar and Sri Lanka and the WhatsApp lynchings in Brazil and India. Well, the same process is happening in Europe now, on a massive scale. Here’s how Facebook tore France apart. (BuzzFeed)

Buzzfeed reported on 6 December (before the above BBC headline)

This week, protesters scaled the Arc de Triomphe, burned cars, and clashed with police in the third consecutive weekend of riots in France. More than 300 people were arrested in Paris last weekend alone, and 37,000 law enforcement officers have been deployed around the country to restore order.

The “Gilets Jaunes” or “Yellow Jackets” protests have only gotten more violent since they began last month. Three people have died, hundreds more have been injured. To hear the protesters tell it, they’re marching through the streets to fight back against rising fuel prices and the high cost of living in the country. Beyond that, though, it’s an ideological free-for-all. Fights have also been witnessed among demonstrators, and some have sent death threats to other protesters.

But what’s happening right now in France isn’t happening in a vacuum. The Yellow Jackets movement — named for the protesters’ brightly colored safety vests — is a beast born almost entirely from Facebook. And it’s only getting more popular. Recent polls indicate the majority of France now supports the protesters. The Yellow Jackets communicate almost entirely on small, decentralized Facebook pages. They coordinate via memes and viral videos. Whatever gets shared the most becomes part of their platform.

Due to the way algorithm changes made earlier this year interacted with the fierce devotion in France to local and regional identity, the country is now facing some of the worst riots in many years — and in Paris, the worst in half a century.

https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/ryanhatesthis/france-paris-yellow-jackets-facebook

To be fair to the sheep and the French, the French mob doesn’t need much to get it violent. But you know what I’m trying to drive at: Facebook is a great tool to organise and energise people.

Over to you Mad Dog. Turn the sheep into mad dogs? Still say we got to appease the neighbours? Yr silence is deafening.

Disassociate yrself from Tan Wah Piow, PJ Thum and Kirsten Han* ( “Antics Of Civil Society Activists Endanger Opposition Cause”); and Jolovan Wham: Nothing wrong in asking Tun M to intervene in S’porean affairs. Their silence is deafening shameful and in character. Sad.

(Last four sentences added after first publication)

 

What the anti-PAP cybernuts have in common with US progressives

In Internet on 02/10/2018 at 10:28 am

The very people who thoughtlessly and carelessly allowed Trump to “Make America Great Again”.

How a disastrous change in perspective disempowered the left and let the right rise

By dismissing the masses as fools, progressives confirmed all the culture warriors’ claims

are the headlines of an article (https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/oct/01/how-a-disastrous-change-in-perspective-disempowered-the-left-and-let-the-right-rise )in the ang hoh tua kees’ favourite British paper (One reason it’s a fav is that it’s free: unlike my favs the FT and Economist)

It went on somewhere towards the end

The consolatory power of the “idiot nation” trope was obvious. If voters were slack-jawed rubes, well, it couldn’t be the fault of progressives that protests were small or that leftwing ideas lacked purchase. Activists committed to smug politics could take comfort knowing that the masses were too dumb to grasp the cogent arguments being presented to them.

But, politically, such rhetoric was disastrous. By dismissing the people as fools, progressives confirmed everything the culture warriors said: they openly embraced the condescending stereotype of the liberal elitist.

Now doesn’t this sound familiar in the S’pore context?

The views appearing in TRE, Terry’s OnLine Channel, The Indians Idiots, social media etc are that the 60-70% of S’porean voters who regularly vote for the PAP are morons. And that the hard core PAP haters are the ones that should rule S’pore.

———————————

Related article

Singaporeans want an opposition but are “very discerning in the type of opposition they seek. In my view, it is not wise to pursue any approach that does not establish firmer foundations for a permanent and institutionalised opposition in Singapore.

Pritam Singh, Wankers’ Party Sec Gen

(For the context of his comments read: https://www.todayonline.com/singapore/wp-chief-pritam-singh-responds-activist-select-committees-treatment-historian-thum)

WP: Spot on Bayee/ Lim Tean’s first anniversary of BSing


With enemies like the ang moh tua kees like and their cybernut allies the PAP doesn’t need friends to stay in power.

And I’m not the only one who thinks the PAP’s enemies are the reason why the PAP will rule S’pore forever and a day: “Antics Of Civil Society Activists Endanger Opposition Cause”

 

 

Crazy Pinoy Asians

In Internet on 27/09/2018 at 4:20 am

Only in America.

Frustrated by the lack of Asian people on the marketing posters covering the restaurant, Jevh Maravilla and Christian Toledo took matters into their own hands.

The pair took a photo of themselves, added the McDonald’s branding and hung it on a bare wall in their local restaurant in Houston, Texas.

Now

One of the two friends who caught the attention of millions when they pranked their local McDonald’s has told the BBC that he “wants to push Asian representation further” in “TV and Hollywood”.

Jevh Maravilla, 21, added that “the past few weeks have felt like a dream.”

On the Ellen DeGeneres Show last week the men were each presented with cheques for $25,000 (about £19,000) from the company and told they would be starring in a marketing campaign.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-45633982

In S’pore. they’d be caned for vandalism and flamed on social media and the internet for being Peeoys. Sad.

Coming to a polyclinic near u

In Internet on 22/09/2018 at 6:43 am

Video consultation for patients with chronic problems who need to see a doctor only because the prescriptions need to be renewed. At least that’s what Morocco Mole, Secret Squirrel’s side-kick, tells me. It’ll take a while though.

But based on this experience of a S’porean using video consultation, the wait will be worth it and give poor or cheap skate oldies with chronic diseases another reason to vote for the PAP.

Aisha Lin, a 25-year-old Singaporean … told the Nikkei Asian Review that video consultation had proved to be “an optimal experience” for her. “If I just have a minor condition and/or require prescribed medication, I really dislike being in the same enclosed space as other very sick people — those with a high fever, stomach flu, etc,” she said.

Nikkei Asian Review

Whatever telemedicine is already here. Ms Lin was using Singapore’s Doctor Anywhere. More on this app

Singapore’s Doctor Anywhere, launched in 2017, is one of the growing healthcare apps in the city-state, with some 50,000 users serviced by 50 doctors. The app offers video consultation, which is priced at 20 Singapore dollars ($14.50), as well as the delivery of medicines to a patient’s location.

[…]

There are also some benefits for doctors who work with tele-health apps. The apps can be a gateway to reach “more potential patients,” said Lim Wai Mun, founder of Doctor Anywhere. “Doctors can feel more connected with the patients by making themselves available and more accessible,” he added.

Advice to cybernuts writing in TOC, TRE etc

In Internet on 10/09/2018 at 7:13 am

The first rule when writing opinion pieces is: don’t be boring.

If want to pontificate or rant, don’t be boring.
Pls also stop defending PJ (and his kakis Jovolan and Kirsten) for asking
the Malaysian prime minister to take a leading role in promoting democracy and freedom of expression in Southeast Asia.
because by so doing you are continuing to help the PAP change the conversation: : WTF! With PAP on the ropes why this self-inflicted distraction?
And pls don’t write about changing s 377A in the light of another flip flop by the Indian Supreme court. Again you are continuing to help the PAP change the conversation
Go back to KPKBing on bread and butter issues like HDB leases, GST, MRT etc. Remember,the PAP was on the ropes until PJ’s action: PJ Thum cares about S’pore?

Not ground sour, juz kopi tiam talk amplified lah

In Internet on 06/09/2018 at 10:55 am

Er but taz missing the point about talking cock.

I’ve said in Smell the smoke? From Indonesia or from the PAP & cybernuts? that I’m not sure if the ground is as sour as Han Fook Kwang makes it sound.

Well I was planning to blog along the lines of the following letter to ST’s Forum: what we are hearing are voices that were once confined to small, disconnected groups. But since it has appeared, I’ll juz copy and paste like our millionaire ministers. Make sure you read a response to this letter I reproduce below. It says that my and letter writer’s point of view is irrelevant, missing the point: we also talking cock.

‘More discontent’ may be due to technology amplifying voices

While editor-at-large Han Fook Kwang presents an interesting take on why there is “more grumbling than usual about issues especially to do with the Government”, I have a different perspective on the matter (Is the ground sour? Time to tackle it; Aug 26).

Hailing from the generation that witnessed life without the convenience of gadgets, I can only conclude that we have to accept the hue and cry from the ground as the new normal.

Previously, when mobile phones and the Internet were virtually unheard of, the chatter of discontent could be heard only in coffee shops or during conversations between family or friends.

However, in the present day, technology has enabled muted voices to be heard through platforms such as social media. The anonymity afforded by such mediums has culminated in a cacophony of outbursts from the ground, which many tend to associate with growing discontent among the people.

The sudden rise in the ubiquity of digital devices has somehow led to the misconception that the conformity and orderliness of the old order have been replaced by the messiness of the new generation.

We have to accept that change and messiness is the new constant.

A FB post commenting on this Forum letter:

The heart of the issue is whether such complaints are valid. And politicians still need to assess the situation for themselves. Is high cost of living a perception or real? What is real problem of HDB 99 yr lease ownership.

Yes technology amplifies but someone still need to deal with it or you can lose a GRC.

AI is a problem for India and PeenoyLand

In India, Internet on 28/08/2018 at 7:04 am

And call centre workers everywhere.

The biggest threat to jobs might not be physical robots, but intelligent software agents that can understand our questions and speak to us, integrating seamlessly with all the other programs we use at home and at work. And call centres are particularly at risk.

BBC https://www.bbc.com/news/business-45272835

It reports Brian Manusama, an analyst at market research firm Gartner saying:

“The number one use case for applying AI is in this call centre and customer service space”

and

“At the end of 2017 about 70% of all use cases in AI were related to customer service and call centres.”

Scale of problem

Several million people are employed in call centre roles in the US and UK and hundreds of thousands more rely on such work in countries like India and the Philippines. Unless these people quickly learn new skills, they could soon be out of work.

Modified to attribute the story to BBC, not FT. Sorry.

Juz be smarter than AI

In Internet, Uncategorized on 24/08/2018 at 6:40 am

Jason Karp, who runs the long-short equity hedge fund Tourbillon Capital, put it this way earlier this yr at the Milken Institute global conference in Los Angeles: “What do you know that a machine cannot work out?”

More qns for education minister

In Internet on 19/08/2018 at 11:18 am

Earlier today I asked if our education could produce the Oz boy who hacked Apple because he dreamed of working for Apple: Qn for education minister

More questions:

Does our education system have room for R00tz Asylum, a non-profit organisation that promotes “hacking for good” and these kids?

It

created 13 sites that mimicked the real [US election] websites, gaping vulnerabilities and all, for 13 so-called “battleground” states – parts of the country where the vote is expected to be tight.

Over the course of a day, 39 kids aged between 8 and 17 took the challenge – 35 of them succeeded in bypassing the trivial security. Pranks ensued. At one time the site told us 12 billion votes had been cast. Later, we were told that candidate “Bob Da Builder” was the victor.

Or this kind of kids’ activity?

The contest was part of the kids’ zone at Def Con, the annual hacking conference in Las Vegas.

Or this kind of kids?

This year it was attended by more than 300 eager children, trying everything from lock picking to soldering. At one table I meet two-year-old Catherine Sabonis, happily picking apart a debit card reader. Organisers tell me around half of the attendees are girls.

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-45154903

An anti-PAP cyberwarrior* says that our kids have world class analytical, problem solving skills because of the local system. And I know some really smart, creative kids** but I don’t see or read about our kids doing things like these US kids.


*Avoid dementia, don’t be anti-PAP like Meng Seng

**Good in STEM subjects but who love Sing Lit and music.

Qn for education minister

In Internet on 19/08/2018 at 6:24 am

We do well in PISA rankings but so what? Got kid like this?

An Ozzie kid who dreams of working for Apple hacked Apple’s systems and

accessed 90 gigabytes worth of files, breaking into the system many times over the course of a year from his suburban home in Melbourne, reports The Age newspaper.

BBC reports

According to The Age, the teen had boasted about his activities in WhatsApp messages. It reports that he had hacked into the firm because he was a huge fan and dreamed of working there.

His defence lawyer said that he had become very well-known in the international hacking community.

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-45219895

Memo to Paper General heading Computer Security Agency

In Internet, S'pore Inc on 17/08/2018 at 11:19 am

From a Mr Happy

I avoid Intel and use AMD in my systems. I have found that the Ryzen processor family offers great performance with out the power consumption or heat output of its predecessors.

Putting my CTO hat on for a moment, in reality there are always holes in the security of both software and  hardware or exploits previously not considered. So keep things patched, keep security layers tight, stay on top the available information and do not get complacent because at that point you assume you are secure then you become vulnerable. It comes under two headings, security and managing your IT estate, if you fail to maintain your investment you will fall behind and be vulnerable. If you or your organisation does not have the knowledge get a professional in to conduct an audit and security sweep. Organisations are facing far more security vulnerabilities and threats than at any previous point in the technology revolution and many organisations are not managing it correctly.

Comment on FT article about latest Intel problem

Paper BG can cut and paste and pass off as his own genius at work. Like SMRT Neo juz cutting and pasting ang moh practice

Related post:

Is Computer Security Agency CEO talking thru his ass about stolen info?

MAS gives finger to CSA’s CEO

In Internet, Public Administration on 25/07/2018 at 11:00 am

Remember CSA’s CEO downplaying the loss of NRIC numbers etc (Is Computer Security Agency CEO talking thru his ass about stolen info?)?

Should you be worried?

In short, not really, said the authorities. CSA chief executive David Koh said the stolen information are “basic demographic data”.

Constructive, nation-building CNA

Well it’s now clear that the central bank for one thinks he’s talking cock

“With immediate effect, all financial institutions should not rely solely on the types of information stolen (name, NRIC number, address, gender, race, and date of birth) for customer verification,” MAS said in a statement.

“Additional information must be used for verification before undertaking transactions for the customer. This may include, for instance, One-Time Password, PIN, biometrics, last transaction date or amount, etc.”

 

 

Is Computer Security Agency CEO talking thru his ass about stolen info?

In Internet, Media, Public Administration on 22/07/2018 at 10:32 am

I went WTF when I read this from the constructive, nation-building CNA:

Should you be worried?

In short, not really, said the authorities. CSA chief executive David Koh said the stolen information are “basic demographic data”.

“We are watching to see if anything appears on the Internet both in the open and in some of the less well-known websites,” he added, noting that this has occasionally happened in past data breaches.

“But considering the type of data that’s been exfiltrated, it is – from our professional experience – unlikely that these will appear, because there is no strong commercial value to these types of data.”

Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/singhealth-cyberattack-what-you-need-to-know-10549096

I repeat WTF. NRIC numbers were stolen as were names and addresses. Before this loss of info, we had been told by the PAP govt and private sector cyber security experts that the NRIC number is very important personal data and that when a criminal has access to our i/c number, address and name, lialat: could be vulnerable to all kinds of online crime. So this not true isit?

I had also read in an earlier CNA report

[C]ybersecurity expert, Mr Leonard Kleinman, pointed out that medical data contains a trove of information – from personally identifiable data to financial details – “that can be used to create a highly sought-after composite of an individual”.

Such pilfered data can fetch a high price on the dark Web, with each entry potentially selling for US$50 to US$100 more than stolen credit card data, said Mr Kleinman, who is the chief Cyber Security Advisor at RSA Asia Pacific and Japan.

“As it could contain any amount and level of information, healthcare institutions are among the most sought-after industries by criminals who can be motivated by a multitude of possible reasons,” he said.

The executive also cautioned that the fallout of such a hack may not be immediately felt either, as it could “take months” for the data to be first sold, then used.

“Given the nature of this attack, it is hard to say exactly what the end game is, especially when the attackers haven’t identified themselves,” Mr Kleinman added.

Darktrace Asia Pacific managing director Sanjay Aurora told Channel NewsAsia in an email that it can only speculate on the hacker’s motives, but medical information, like other kinds of personal data, can be easily monetised.

That said, beyond making a quick buck, Mr Aurora said a more “sinister reason” could be to cause widespread disruption and systemic damage to the healthcare service or to undermine trust in a nation’s competency to keep personal data safe.

Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/singhealth-cyberattack-likely-nation-state-medical-data-price-10549372

So is the PAP govt downplaying the importance of the loss of info?

And if it is, why isn’t the constructive, nation-building media not signing from the same sheet?

World Cup viewing: What PAP govt got right

In Internet on 14/07/2018 at 11:04 am

(Part of another occasional series on the good things the PAP govt do that TOC, TRE and other cybernut sites don’t report: not that many but still enough to keep 70% happy.)

Plenty of KPKBing by some TRE commenters, and TOC, and other cybernut sites about no free viewing on tv at home. Shows that they behind curve. Many S’poreans (including TeamTRE who tell readers how to get free streaming service) watching watching for free via streaming.

S’pore’s a good place to watch streamed stuff.

Fastest broadband speeds can be found in:

  • Singapore – average 60Mbps
  • Sweden – 46Mbps
  • Denmark – 43.9Mbps
  • Norway – 40.1Mbps
  • Romania – 38.6Mbps
  • Belgium – 36.7Mbps
  • Netherlands – 35.9Mbps
  • Luxembourg – 35.1Mbps
  • Hungary – 34Mbps
  • Jersey – 30.9Mbps

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-44778017

HoHoHo: Singtel’s big World Cup balls-up

In Footie, Internet, Telecoms, Temasek on 19/06/2018 at 10:53 am

Fortunately for the PAP govt and S’porean footie fans, it’s in Oz.

[F]or Optus, Australia’s second-biggest telecoms company, the 2018 Fifa World Cup is fast becoming a public relations disaster.

On Monday the Singtel-owned operator, which holds the streaming rights to all 64 matches, voluntarily handed its television rival SBS the rights to broadcast the following two nights of world cup action. It made the decision following a consumer backlash prompted by technical difficulties with its own streaming services- and a public intervention by Malcolm Turnbull, Australia’s prime minister.

FT

SBS is state-owned.

It’s not echo chamber effect of social media

In Internet on 20/05/2018 at 4:48 am

It’s all about “A little knowledge is a dangerous thing”.

Contrary to popular belief, we now hear more diverse voices than ever before – studies suggest that most people do not live in Facebook or Twitter echo chambers and ‘filter bubbles’. So why is global politics still so divided?

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20180416-the-myth-of-the-online-echo-chamber

People become more divided because we are dismissive of contrary evidence that challenges our beliefs

“motivated reasoning”. Countless studies have shown that we are so attached to our political identities that we will devote extra cognitive resources to dismissing any evidence that disagrees with our initial point of view, so that we end up even more sure of our convictions.

Or because a little knowledge is dangerous

But an alternative possible explanation comes from the psychology of ‘self-licensing’ – the unconscious belief that once we have shown our open-mindedness in one situation, we have somehow earned the credentials to be more prejudiced later on. One study from 2008 found that people who had supported Barack Obama were subsequently more likely to express a potentially racist view, for instance. By reading a few dissenting voices on Facebook or Twitter, we may feel that we have already gained the right to be more dogmatic about our existing opinions. Anecdotally, at least, this seems to have been the case for a few of my own acquaintances following the UK’s referendum on Europe in 2016.

 

Achtung: What Google says about TRE site

In Internet on 13/05/2018 at 4:52 am

When I try to access TRE’s sit,. Google sends me a strongly worded message that the site contains malware. And tells me to avoid the site, though I can go to the site if I really, really want to.

Previously my anti-virus software cut me off from the site because it was beta testing crypto-mining. TRE told visitors of its plans. I had suggested moons ago that it try to crypto-mining to help pay expenses from its freeloading cheapskates.

How PAP can tame cyberspace while making money (cont’d)

In Internet on 04/05/2018 at 10:52 am

The spate between no-class Charles Chong (representing the no-class PAP administration), and some lobbied (instigated? manipulated?) over-sensitive (Err did they watch the video of the exchange, or relied on hearsay? And from whom? PJ?) Oxford University academics (not colleges I note) and the non-entity Project Southeast Asia (more on this strange beast soon) reminds me of

“The unspeakable in pursuit of the uneatable!”

Oscar Wilde

“A plague o’ both your houses!”

Mercutio, Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare

It further reminds me that the PAP are missing another two tricks from darkest, dysfunctional Africa. Making bloggers Pay and Pay and tieing them up in petty details are what the PAP can introduce from Africa.

I had in Fighting fake news while raising revenue where I pointed out that our meritocratic scholars in the PAP administration could learn from Uganda in darkest, dysfunctional Africa: they could tax users of social media.

Another country from that dark continent has two brilliant ideas

Tanzania’s government has come up with a scheme that could prove even more draconian [referring to Uganda’s plan]: it plans to charge hundreds of dollars a year for the privilege of blogging. As part of new online regulations, bloggers will be required to pay hefty registration and annual licence fees that add up to roughly $920 — prohibitive for most in a country with a nominal per capita income of under $900. In proportion to GDP, the Tanzanian registration and licence fee would be the equivalent of asking Americans to pay nearly $60,000 to start a blog.

FT

Somehow I don’t think, the Idiots S’pore, Terry Online’s Channel or TRE (even if TRE’s pilot plan to use visitors’ clicks to mine crpto coins takes off) can afford the kind of sums required. Different for the SDP (CIA? Or Soros?) and mothership (George Yeo?Philip Yeo?).

And I certainly can’t be bothered with the paper work Tanzania is insisting on

What are the rules?

All online publishers including bloggers, vloggers and podcasters have up to 5 May to register and are required to pay $480 for a three-year licence, plus an annual fee of $440.

Radio and TV stations must also apply for licences to share their content online.

To get a permit, applicants must fulfil a list of requirements, like submitting staff CVs and reveal their future plans.

They will also have to keep a record of visitors to their site.

The regulations say the aim is to clamp down on “hate speech” and indecent material with the same standard being applied to online users.

They broadly define a blog as “a website containing a writer’s, or group of writer’s own, experiences, observations, opinions including current news… images, video clips and links to other websites”.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-43867292

Why I no ak the Select Committee hearings on Deliberate Online Falsehoods

In Internet, Media, Political governance on 29/04/2018 at 11:46 am

The problem about lies or “fake news” is who gets to decide what is or is not a lie or “fake news”.

In liberal democracies, even the president of the US cannot get his view of what is or is not a lie or “fake news” accepted by even a majority of the voters. There’s some sort of consensus (“conventional wisdom”) driven (manipulated?) by the elites and media about what is or is not a lie or “fake news” in which facts often play an important part.

In a one-party state (de facto or de jure), the ruling party decides what is or is not a lie or “fake news”

— Keeping power in a one-party state

— Would this happen in a one-party state?

— Coldstore: Why Harry’s narrative or the highway

The planned tackling of “fake news” is a smokescreen for muzzling further netizens, not juz cybernuts. The internet and social media has made it a lot easier for S’poreans to share facts, ideas, and criticisms of the way we are governed by the PAP.

— Minister wants his cake and eat it/ PAP doesn’t get the Internet

— Ingratitude, uniquely S’porean? Blame the internet? Not really

— Us Netizens: Comancherios of the Internet?

This freedom (relative) to share facts, ideas, and criticisms of the way we are governed by the PAP worries the PAP (juz like the CCP worries about the internet and social media in China), hence the plan to further muzzle the internet and social media.

Facebook has money to clean up its act

In Internet on 28/04/2018 at 4:36 am

But will it? I doubt it.

Peter Eavis’s take: If Facebook wants to spend more on protecting its community, it can: Its operating earnings are equivalent to 46 percent of its revenue. But its expense numbers haven’t provided clear evidence that the company is going the extra mile yet.

More from NYT’s Dealbook

Facebook can afford to clean up its act
The tech giant has promised to spend a lot of money on improving its operations after the Cambridge Analytica scandal. It’s not yet clear quite how much — Mark Zuckerberg told analysts yesterday that the company was still working on making its products “good for people and good for society.” And his chief technology officer, Mike Schroepfer, told U.K. lawmakers this morning that Facebook would vet British political ads next year.
What’s now apparent: These controversies are yet to hurt the bottom line.
Facebook’s first-quarter earnings featured a 63 percent jump in profit and a 49 percent rise in revenue. And roughly 70 million new monthly active users.
Peter Eavis’s take: If Facebook wants to spend more on protecting its community, it can: Its operating earnings are equivalent to 46 percent of its revenue. But its expense numbers haven’t provided clear evidence that the company is going the extra mile yet.
The key assessment, from the Pivotal analyst Brian Wieser:
“All the data privacy issues, the congressional hearings, none of that will get as much scrutiny from investors as the bottom line.”

Further adventures of the Russkie who “fixed” FB

In Internet on 26/04/2018 at 5:51 am

On behalf of Putin and the KGB? After all Facebook, together with Google, showed that hegemony of US of A’s soft power. But Facebook’s numbers juz grow and grow. More mud in Putin’s eye. He got Trump elected but his billionaire pals are getting hurt by the US of A and his nercenaries get killed with impunity by the US military.

Sorry back to the Russkie that was based here.

Last week, Aleksandr Kogan, the academic who passed FB user data to Cambridge Analytica said he was considering suing Facebook for suggesting that he had acted unethically.

Then Mr Kogan on Tuesday criticised the social network for relying on an “honour system” to protect user information that he said was “mined left and right” by developers on Tuesday at a hearing conducted by British MPs.

He also told the British lawmakers

that the social network had singled him out for the leak but knew that user data gathered by developers could be passed to third parties. He stressed that Facebook had not done enough to check the data gathered by his app had been deleted. “They know the platform has been mined left and right,” he said, “They’re trying to point the finger at one entity and paint the picture that it is a rogue agency.”

Zuckerberg caught with pants down again

In Internet on 22/04/2018 at 5:02 am

After what Zuckerberg said to Congress, Facebook then spun that it could be adopting the new European laws on privacy and everything else as its default protection standard for the rest of the world including the US.

In his answers to Congress over Facebook’s involvement in the scandal, Mark Zuckerberg said that GDPR [new European laws on privacy and everything else]        was “going to be a very positive step for the internet”.

When asked whether the regulations should be applied in the US, he replied: “I think everyone in the world deserves good privacy protection.”

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-43822184

Well, we now know that that’s a lot of bull because the BBC report says

Facebook has changed its terms of service, meaning 1.5 billion members will not be protected under tough new privacy protections coming to Europe.

The move comes as the firm faces a series of questions from lawmakers and regulators around the world over its handling of personal data.

The change revolves around which users will be regulated via its European headquarters in Ireland.

Facebook said it planned clearer privacy rules worldwide.

The move, reported by Reuters, will see Facebook users outside the EU governed by Facebook Inc in the US rather than Facebook Ireland.

It is widely seen as a way of the social network avoiding having to apply the upcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) to countries outside the EU.

The change will affect more than 70% of its more than two billion members. As of December, Facebook had 239 million users in the US and Canada and 370 million in Europe.

It also had 1.5 billion members in Africa, Asia, Australia and Latin America, and they are the ones affected by the change.

Users in the US and Canada have never been subject to European rules.

In 2008, Facebook set up its international headquarters in Ireland to take advantage of the country’s low corporate tax rates but it also meant all users outside the US and Canada were protected by European regulations.

The change will mean users outside Europe will no longer be able to file complaints with the Irish data protection commissioner or in the Irish courts.

GDPR, due to come into force next month, offers EU consumers far greater control over their data. It also promises to fine firms found to have breached data rules up to 4% of their annual global revenue.

 

FB: Cambridge strikes back

In Internet on 21/04/2018 at 5:01 am

Cambridge University’s  Psychometrics Centre has responded to Seth Lord Zuckerberg’s slime balling of Cambridge Psychometrics Centre (Think Shanmugam’s attack on PJ Thum)

The Centre, which is located in the Judge Business School, was drawn into the controversy when Facebook banned Cubeyou, another firm that had developed a personality quiz in collaboration with the university’s academics.

Business development director Vesselin Popov insisted it was opt-in only and was in line with Facebook’s policies at the time, so was not at all like the app developed for Cambridge Analytica by Dr Kogan.

He told me that Dr Kogan’s work had raised issues for the university: “Even if an academic does something – quote unquote in their ‘spare time’, with their own company – they still ought to be held to professional standards as a psychologist.”

Dr Kogan and the Cambridge Psychometrics Centre are in dispute over whether a row over his personality app – and the involvement of the centre’s academics – was about ethics or money. I wrote another article about that issue on Friday.

But the two sides agree that Facebook needs to focus on what commercial businesses do with user data, rather than academics.

“It’s very clear that Cambridge Analytica and these kinds of companies are the product of an environment to which Facebook has contributed greatly,” says Mr Popov. “Although they might be making some changes today in response to public and regulatory pressure, this needs to be seen as an outcome of very permissive attitudes towards those companies.”

With an audit of thousands of Facebook apps under way, we may hear more in the coming weeks about just how cavalier some companies have been with our personal data.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-43758850

Zuckerberg is real life Two-Face Harvey

In Internet on 20/04/2018 at 4:24 am

Remember Batman’s enemy Two-Face Harvey (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-Face)?

Well reading the u/m extract from the by the BBC’s media editor, I couldn’t help think that we need Batman to fight Zuckerberg, the incarnate of Two-Face Harvey :

There’s Mark Zuckerberg, the Ultimate Millennial. He wears t-shirt and jeans, is a Harvard dropout, happiest in New York and San Francisco, who talks a good game about connecting the world. He’s an engineer and geek who built perhaps the most remarkable network in human history, innovating his way to astronomical wealth. This guy is shy, but has a public persona that accommodates it.

Then there’s a chap I call Mark Sorryberg – the Big Tech Villain. He wears an ill-fitting suit, squirms when in Washington, is blamed for damaging all we hold dear – from rigging elections (“He’s killing democracy”!) to promoting extremism (“He’s unweaving society”!) and not paying enough tax (“He’s screwing the poor”!). This guy is so shy he comes across as awkward and uncomfortable when he should be projecting authority.

http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-43740113

Let’s be serious Two-Face Zuckerberg seems to have a

Split personality: Multiple personality disorder, a neurosis in which the personality becomes dissociated into two or more distinct parts each of which becomes dominant and controls behavior from time to time to the exclusion of the other parts. A modern name for this condition is dissociative identity disorder.

https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=11257

 

What Mark Zuckerberg didn’t say

In Internet on 17/04/2018 at 4:37 am

From NYT Dealbook

Despite two days of congressional testimony, the Facebook chief didn’t address some issues, including the tech giant’s role in violence worldwide. Shira Ovide of Gadfly thinks that his evasiveness about how the company works shows that it’s embarrassed. (Oh, and the European Parliament wants Mr. Zuckerberg to testify, too.)

U.S. lawmakers seem to agree regulation is needed, but doubt that it’s coming. Senator John Cornyn, Republican of Texas, told the NYT, “I think we need to be careful.” Representative Frank Pallone Jr., Democrat of New York, said, “I don’t believe the Republicans will end up doing anything.”

The latest Facebook scandal has finally put a spotlight on data privacy, experts say. One, Doc Searls, told the NYT, “They’re saying, ‘O.K., it’s barn-raising time.’ ” (Facebook still isn’t expecting a hit to sales.)

 

Facebook’s Catch 22

In Internet on 15/04/2018 at 2:00 pm

The following day, he was asked by Congressman Ben Lujan about the data collected on people who had never even signed up to Facebook. Again, Mr Zuckerberg appeared uncomfortable. He had never heard of the widely used term “shadow profiles” to describe this kind of data collection.

Then the congressman took us down an Alice in Wonderland-style rabbit hole, where people who do not use Facebook are told to log in to their Facebook accounts to find out what data Facebook holds on them. “We’ve got to fix that,” he said.

Frederike Kaltheuner from Privacy International tells Tech Tent that this kind of data collection, with users unaware of what is happening, is all too common – and Facebook is far from the only culprit.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-43758850

Fighting fake news while raising revenue

In Internet on 14/04/2018 at 10:43 am

Funny our Pay and Pay scholar-filled govt didn’t think of this idea first. Uganda in darkest, dysfunctional Africa first tot of taxing users of social media to curb “gossip” (ie fake news) and raise revenue.

Taxing social media should the additional benefit, from the PAP’s point of view of curbing free speech, and so is something that the PAPpies should have tot up before the men from darkest, dysfunctional Africa.

From the BBC

Uganda plans to impose a daily tax on social media users from July in a bid to raise revenue, Finance Minister Matia Kasaija has told Reuters news agency.

The move has been criticised by rights activist Rosebell Kagumire who said: “It’s part of a wider attempt to curtail freedoms of expression.”

Earlier this month, President Yoweri Museveni – who has been in power for more than 30 years – was quoted by Uganda’s privately owned Daily Monitor newspaper as saying in a letter to Mr Kasaija and other officilas that a tax should be introduced on people who use social media for “gossip”.

“I am not going to propose a tax on internet use for educational, research or reference purposes… these must remain free,” he was quoted as saying.

The proposed tax will see each mobile phone subscriber who uses platforms such as WhatsApp, Facebook and Twitter being charged, Reuters reports.

The amount is unclear – Reuters reports that Mr Kasaija said it will be 200 Ugandan shillings ($0.027) a day, while State Minister for Planning David Bahati is quoted by the Daily Monitor as saying it will be 100 shillings.

“We’re looking for money to maintain the security of the country and extend electricity so that you people can enjoy more of social media, more often, more frequently,” Mr Kasaija told Reuters.

True Uganda’s proposed charges are “peanuts” to S’poreans but a dollar a day will make talk cock, sing song, cheap skate anti-PAP cybernuts like Aloysius Foo and Lauschke Amythink twice about using social media.

Words that could haunt Zuckerberg

In Internet on 13/04/2018 at 4:09 am

He said on Tuesday “I agree we are responsible for the content.”

NYT Dealbook explains the importance of these words:

These were the most important words from Mark Zuckerberg’s five-hour testimony: “I agree we are responsible for the content.” They may come back to haunt him, given his previous rejection of calling Facebook a publisher. He later backtracked and called his business a tech company, but his acknowledgment may fundamentally shift the conversation — and how the company operates. (All in all, Mr. Zuckerberg did better than anyone had expected.)

Zuckerberg doesn’t know how FB tracks users

In Internet on 12/04/2018 at 3:09 pm

Senator Kamala Harris, a Democrat from California, kicked his balls with this

“During the course of this hearing, these last four hours, you have been asked several critical questions for which you do not have answers,” she said. “Those questions have included whether Facebook can track users’ browsing activity even after the user has logged off of Facebook, whether Facebook can track your activity across devices even when you are not logged into Facebook.”

He promised to provide answers when asked these questions.

FB’s massive data: the S’pore connection

In Internet on 09/04/2018 at 4:49 am

Kogan was here in S’pore from 2013-16 before moving on to Berkeley, California, a regular reader of, and commenter on this blog, yuenchungkwong, (a retired professor of computer science, NUS) informs.

Funny the constructive, nation-building ST  and other local media don’t trumpet the achievements of this Foreign Talent while here. I mean the guy’s a FT where the “T” doesn’t stand for “Trash” but for “Talent”. Usually FTs end up in the news for beating taxi drivers and S’poreans, not for being geniuses.  

After all, it was in 2014 that his infamous app appeared on FB.  

———————————————–

Backgrounder for visiting Martians and other extraterrestrials)

In 2014 a quiz on Facebook invited users to find out their personality type.

It was developed by University of Cambridge academic Aleksandr Kogan (the university has no connections with Cambridge Analytica).

As was common with apps and games at that time, it was designed to harvest not only the user data of the person taking part in the quiz, but also the data of their friends.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-43465968

The allegation is that because 270,000 people took the quiz, the data of some 50 million users, mainly in the US, was harvested without their explicit consent via their friend networks. FB now says the data of 87m users was harvested

———————————————–

He was even a guest speaker on 2 December 2014 at NUS:(http://blog.nus.edu.sg/psychology/2014/11/24/brown-bag-guest-speaker-dr-alex-kogan-on-2-december/)

I will discuss how big data can be collected, stored, and analyzed, and the types of new insights it can provide to social scientists.

And he was very open on his access to FB data

I focus specifically on Facebook data and two datasets my lab is currently work with: (a) a sample of 50+ million individuals for whom we have the capacity to predict virtually any trait, and (b) a macro-dataset of every friendship made in the world on Facebook from 2006-2012 by all Facebook users at the national-aggregate level.

While here, he married a S’porean, Crystal Ying Chia, and here’s a story about them and their zany sense of humour: https://www.asianmoneyguide.com/crystal-ying-spectre. They adopted a homeless dogs. My mongrels say, “Power to them”.

The latest according to the regular reader is that she has filed for divorce in California. My mongrels want to know what happened to their dog?

My thanks again to yuenchungkwong, a retired professor of computer science, NUS. And prof, if u got any project that utilising yr skills can make money, let me know. Can raise $ for u.

 

 

 

Why some say FB should not do more

In Internet on 08/04/2018 at 4:43 am

but first, as far as I’m concerned the howls of coming from progressives is as Steve Bannon, Trump’s evil genius, OK OK former chief strategist said

liberals and “the opposition media” were looking for excuses to explain Hillary Clinton’s election loss.

If Hilary had won, and it’s clear that she too was using the same type of profiling (as was Obama) but no so effective: I kept getting FB posts dissing Trump from a lesbian, other human rights activists, and ang moh tua kees based here. They must have been targets of Hilary’s ineffective profiling. The Republicans did not target me with videos of Hilary and her lesbians. Sigh.

Btw, Steve has dismissed the idea that Cambridge Analytica’s work for the Trump campaign swayed the 2016 US election.

Coming back the title, some

analysts were pleased that the Facebook boss did not go further. Ben Schachter, an analyst at Macquarie, said Mr Zuckerberg allayed most of his fears that Facebook would “propose radical changes that would impact the business model”. “Our worry was that Facebook, at Zuckerberg’s direction, could take more radical actions than it has in the past to limit the use of audience segmenting, ad targeting, data sharing, and other privacy-related issues that could lower the monetisation of Facebook data,” he said.

FT report

As an Economist columnist said

When a scandal first breaks, executives at the top of a firm and securities analysts outside it are often myopic, viewing it as a public-relations blip that will not alter a firm’s operations or its competitive position. In the case of Facebook, 44 of the 48 Wall Street analysts who cover it still rate it a “buy”, according to Bloomberg. Many have downplayed the scandal, even though Facebook’s shares have dropped by 18% since the news broke on March 17th.

https://www.economist.com/news/business/21739695-corporate-crises-drive-media-and-politicians-wild-do-they-damage-shareholder

Easy way for FB to solve problems

In Internet on 07/04/2018 at 11:26 am

But advertisters wouldn’t like it. And As Money, talks BS walks, it wouldn’t be adopted.

NYT Dealbook

How a ‘Why Me?’ button could help fix Facebook
In his latest column, Andrew suggests a way the company could make its practices more transparent — one that Google and Amazon could consider, while we’re at it: a button next to every ad and piece of content that would explain why a user is seeing it.
More from Andrew:
The “Why Me?” button might create all sorts of problems for Facebook, and its advertisers, too. It would allow users — and rivals — to reverse engineer much of the way the system works. And advertisers would probably object to the idea of making their targeting plans public. But that would be the cost of using such large public platforms with such exact targeting.

 

Cybernuts, be happy that SPH not so smart

In Internet, Media on 25/03/2018 at 5:04 am

In 2001, Naspers, a South African publisher (It published the ST for the apartheid regime) bought a stake in a lossmaking Chinese start-up in the wake of the dotcom bust for US$32m.

This week it sold more than US$10bn of its shares in Tencent, the Chinese technology group, a sliver (2%age points) of a stake worth US$167bn which it acquired in 2001 for “peanuts”. It still has 31% of Tencent.

Well I’m sure a PAPPy, think Goh Meng Seng (OK, OK, he’s a covert PAPpy), would say Naspers was lucky. Well at the time the ang moh CEO of Naspers was in China looking at internet investment opportunities, so were Temasek, GIC and SPH senior executives.

They so unlucky meh? Remember Napoleon only wanted as marshalls (his most senior generals) generals who were lucky. He knew the importance of luck. Early in his career, he lost a battle but the unexpected arrival of a fresh division turned the battle around.

Or our GIC, Temasek and SPH executives juz stupid?

Btw, Naspers is trading at a 40% discount to its Tencent stake, despite having profitable operational businesses and other successful internet investments. Shareholders are unhappy.

 

Digital ads: the truth

In Internet on 06/03/2018 at 4:37 am

“Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don’t know which half,” is often attributed to John Wanamaker (1838-1922). He was a very successful American merchant, religious leader and politician. He has been called a “pioneer in marketing”.

Digital ads are marketed to advertisers (like Procter & Gamble) by the likes of Google and Facebook as solving the problem of which half is wasted.

But now P&G says that most online advertising is a waste.

Facebook: Don’t sien me leh

In Internet on 04/02/2018 at 7:18 am
Facebook was intended to be as wholesome as apple pie?

From NYT Delbook

Here’s what Samidh Chakrabarti, a product manager at the tech giant, wrote in a post on the company’s Hard Questions blog:

Facebook was originally designed to connect friends and family — and it has excelled at that. But as unprecedented numbers of people channel their political energy through this medium, it’s being used in unforeseen ways with societal repercussions that were never anticipated.

Mr. Chakrabarti added that while the company was slow to address Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, it’s working to prevent it happening again.

I tot it was all about attracting eyeballs and ad revenue by way of trolling, echo chambering and the enabling of fake news. And to Make America Great Again by helping Trump become president.

Ho Ho Ho: Google agrees with Temasek

In Indonesia, Internet, Private Equity, Temasek on 31/01/2018 at 7:31 am

Years ago, Temasek (along with big private equity firms KKR and Sequioa) invested in Indonesian unicorn Go-Jek. The company provides ride-hailing, food delivery and e-payment services.

Well now, Google has invested in Go-Jek as it seeks to further tap Indonesia’s growing internet economy. Google said on Monday it had chosen to invest in Go-Jek as “there was still more we can do to support and participate in Indonesia’s growth”, noting the country is home to the world’s fifth-largest population of internet users. It did not disclose the size of the investment.

Cybernuts should remember that Temasek and Ho Ching don’t always get things wrong (HO HO HO: How Shi**y is StanChart?).

In fact, Temasek (and GIC) like other professionally run SWFs (Think the Arabs but not the Chinese. Think the Chinese investment in Noble House that will be almost wipewd out.) often get investments more right than wrong.

Another deal Temasek (and GIC) got right: Xiaomi’s IPO will make anti-PAPpyists frus.

Tomorrow China, The Day After S’pore

In China, Internet, Political governance, Public Administration on 19/01/2018 at 6:46 am
Further to

Why does PM wants a cashless payments system?

Because no-one can hide from Big Brother when the banks are at the centre of the system.

Why PM wants a cashless payments system

from NYT Dealbook late last yr

The tech that will power China’s police state in the future.

The World Internet Conference in Wuzhen wasn’t just a gathering to show off the latest in Chinese gizmos, like a version of the Consumer Electronics Show. It also offered a glimpse of how new advances in artificial intelligence and facial recognition can be used to track citizens, and how they have become widely accepted.

From Paul Mozur of the NYT:

Investors and analysts say China’s unabashed fervor for collecting such data, combined with its huge population, could eventually give its artificial intelligence companies an edge over American ones. If Silicon Valley is marked by a libertarian streak, China’s vision offers something of an antithesis, one where tech is meant to reinforce and be guided by the steady hand of the state.

Big Brother is watching you. thanks to the the internet and other technology.

Related post: Coming here, China’s new tool for social control?

 

Don’t only blame PAP for low productivity

In Economy, Internet on 16/12/2017 at 6:10 am

Official productivity figures account for the cash value of output produced, divided by the number of workers. So the cybernuts and anti-PAP thinkers (Yes there are some) say that given the PAP’s love of FTs, shipping them in by the cattle truck load, the FT flood results in low productivity.

Maybe that’s part of the reason.

But maybe free lunches account for a large part of the problem of low productivity?

[N]owadays a lot of the valued output people like is offered free to users, delivered cheaply by a low-cost technology.

People use Google services, buy a great deal on Amazon and download entertainment. These free or low-cost services help depress reported productivity.

FT Columnist

 

Real reason why S’pore wants to be a Smart Nation

In Economy, Infrastructure, Internet, Political governance on 04/12/2017 at 3:35 pm

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong says efforts to simplify and integrate electronic payment systems are underway, including making such a method available at hawker centres, in a bid to transform the country into a Smart Nation.
Read more at http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/national-day-rally-singapore-to-go-bigger-on-e-payments-with-9140068

Makes survelliance of the sheep people a lot easier. Black-listing of trouble makers will also be easier.

Companies in China, including Alibaba, Tencent and Baidu, are required to help China’s government hunt criminal suspects and silence political dissent, and their technology is being used to create cities wired for surveillance. (WSJ)

NYT Dealbook

I wrote this Coming here, China’s new tool for social control? sometime ago

Beijing wants to give every citizen a credit rating for everything.  Citizens’ ratings are to be linked with their identity-card numbers. The rating will be based on behaviour such as spending habits, turnstile violations, filial piety and “assembling to disrupt social order”. These scores can be used to blacklist citizens from loans, jobs and air travel.

Countering PAP’s BS that taxes must go up

In Economy, Financial competency, Internet on 26/11/2017 at 4:37 pm

The now retired chief economist of GIC published u/m on his Facebook wall but tOC has circulated it to a wider audience*.

Summary: There’s plenty of money.

And if anyone should know, it should be Yeoh Lam Keong.

The Bigger Fork in Our Long-Term Fiscal Policy Road

To be fair to PM Lee, both the MOF and he have clarified that consistent with DPM Tharmans 2015 remarks, we do not have to raise taxes before the end of the decade.

So there’s really no need to get our fiscal knickers into a twist about GST or income tax increases till after the next GE folks..

IMHO what’s really at stake are larger, more important policy issues and related fiscal choices over the longer term.

What PM was talking about and trying to tell the public was that in the longer term after 2020, tax increases might be needed given inevitable rises in social spending and infrastructure needs in the more distant future.

Actually I really hope that in the end he’s right but from an entirely different angle.

My reason : our current fiscal headroom is so large that were we to truly need higher tax revenues, this would mean that much needed increases in social spending would finally finally have been funded first. Given our current paltry current social policy spending levels, ( much lower than OECD averages as a share of GDP for healthcare, education and social protection) this would be an excellent policy development!

Consider first that we have a 5-7% GDP structural budget surplus ( calculated by global fiscal policemen the IMF no less) – that’s $20-30 bn extra a year. (I don’t want to get into technicalities of how that is a valid number here – please read my previous posts ).

Second, the formula for using net investment returns contribution or NIRC only uses only half of expected long term real returns leaving official reserves to grow by about 2% in real or about 4% in nominal terms for future generations. This could potentially contribute at least another $14bn to the budget or 3.5% of GDP currently.

This 50% spending rule for NIRC itself is a questionable division of investment income from official reserves and a shows a strangely skewed social time preference. Shouldn’t a more reasonable time preference be to use more of the investment income ( not even the real principal mind you ) for the pressing problems of the present generation in this current decade?

Surely the needs of current citizens who have built modern Singapore through very tough times and have serious remaining problems with absolute poverty, inadequate retirement finances, no universal long term or primary chronic health care, underspending in primary and secondary education relative to OECD norms, inadequately planned and funded industrial policy and a badly underperforming public transport system needs this spending now and over this coming decade. Much more so than the uncertain problems of significantly richer coming generations in the much longer term future.

I suspect though, that in the end, we might just be left Singapore daydreaming.

Rather than first spend this hard earned, exceptional fiscal largesse on pressing social and infrastructure needs of the day, then raise taxes only if necessary afterwards, I suspect that our policy makers would instead tend rather towards raising taxes first, partly to keep this implicit huge fiscal savings largely intact ( by the way the IMF thinks that this is an excessively unhealthy level of national savings ) for the rainy day in the even more distant future!

So here is what I think is the really important fork in our long term fiscal and social policy road:

Either we will finally spend enough on social and infrastructural spending – another 8-10% of GDP over the next decade – or we will continue in the kia su practice of spending considerably less, yet still raise taxes in the name of fiscal prudence to maintain one of the most extravagant public savings rates in the world.

All this while continuing to expand social policy at decidedly suboptimal levels that does not really meet our social policy needs sufficiently in all the above key areas.

To do the former means stepping out of current incrementalist, anti – welfare and state intervention mindsets and boldly reshaping, refitting and reinvesting in social policy in healthcare, education, social security, public housing and transport and industrial policy to make these key areas truly future ready for our citizens. This is what we did so successfully and innovatively in our first 30 years of independence.

Please keep in mind that at this much higher level of spending we will merely be at the lower bound of OECD public spending as a share of GDP and roughly on par with developed East Asian economies. We would also be close to true budget balance ie not structurally in fiscal deficit or running up debt. Yes, that’s how extremely conservative our current long term fiscal position is.

The latter, however ( largely status quo), means kicking the can down the road through incremental rather than transformative changes that are likely to end up being constantly behind the relentless curve of economic instability arising from globalization, technological change and worsening demographics. And perversely maintaining the highest and fastest growing fiscal resources in the world.

No prizes for which I think is the more likely scenario on current trends. Which fork we finally take and when, however, depends on both the boldness of political leadership and citizen political awareness to push for a new social and fiscal policy regime that will truly cater to our well being in a more reasonable and balanced but still sustainable way.

*I’m surprised Terry’s Online Channel didn’t republish it for a wider audience, so I’m doing it and hoping that TRE will pick it up for a wider audience: not everyone going to TRE is a cybernut. The rule of thumb on the internet and social media is

1 % of users initiate discussions or content, 9% transmit content or participate occasionally and 90% are consumers or “lurkers”.

I’m hoping to reach the lurkers who visit TRE.

(Btw, didn’t ask permission.)

Will ISD use this Amazon service?

In Internet on 23/11/2017 at 4:34 am

Secret Squirrel, Morocco Mole and Maxwell Smart certainly will

From NYT Dealbook

Amazon’s cloud storage unit has a new service called the Amazon Web Services Secret Region to handle classified information for United States spy agencies. (WaPo)

Are PM and Ho Ching sad and envious?

In Humour, Internet on 05/11/2017 at 1:52 pm

Remember in 2013 PM said at a Zaobao Forum: “Satisfied people don’t have time to go onto the Internet. Unhappy people often go there.”*? Judging by the postings by the ratty and cheapskate cybernuts on TRE (People like Oxygen, Rabble-Rouser, Bapak and Dosh who see the 70% as the enemy within S’pore and want to see them suffer for voting PAP) he has a point about unhappy people who keep insisting that S’pore is collapsing contrary to the evidence. Yes there are serious problems, but nothing existential.

Sorry for the digression: so what can we gather from PM’s and Ho Ching’s regular posts on Facebook?

According to this, they must be sad and envious

Writing in the London Review of Books, John Lanchester cites numerous studies that suggest Facebook use goes hand in hand with envy and sadness, and quite plausibly causes them.

FT article


John Henry Lanchester (born 25 February 1962) is a British journalist and novelist … His journalism has appeared in theLondon Review of Books (where he is a Contributing Editor), Granta, The Observer, The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, the Daily Telegraph andThe New Yorker

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Lanchester

This weekend John Lanchester wrote the cover piece for The Sunday Times Magazine, in which he argued that Facebook was the biggest surveillance enterprise in history, and could destroy civilisation.

—————————————————–

They also got a lot of free time and don’t focus because FB “is also a notorious time-sink and source of distraction” the article goes on.

Btw, Ever wondered this about PM’s Facebook posts?

——————————–

*https://mothership.sg/2013/11/10-signs-prime-minister-lee-hsien-loong-dissatisfied-person/

 

 

Another problem for Anti-PAP websites

In Internet on 30/10/2017 at 4:26 pm

Last year I reported how FB’s algo tweaks affected anti-PAP sites sites like TOC and The Idiots Anti-PAP sites lose traffic after Facebook tweaks algos.

Well things could be getting worse if FB’s latest “experiment” comes to S’pore or is introduced globally.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-41775010

Facebook panics publishers

In any newsroom around the world these days, the air will be full of mentions of Facebook and Twitter. Publishers know the readers and viewers they want to reach are increasingly spending their time scrolling through those apps on their smartphones. And many publishers have come to rely on the social media giants to give their articles and videos maximum exposure.

So a limited experiment by Facebook in six countries – Sri Lanka, Bolivia, Slovakia, Serbia, Guatemala, and Cambodia – to take unpaid news posts out of the main feed and put them into a separate “Explore” tab, raised serious concerns about the financial importance of Silicon Valley to the news media. Slovakian journalist Filip Struharik documented the impact, writing that publishers in his country were seeing just a quarter of the interactions they used to get before the change.

Joshua Benton, who runs the Nieman Journalism Lab at Harvard University, told me that Facebook and Google together are responsible for around 80% of external traffic to news organisation websites, so publishers are right to be worried.

However, he also said that Facebook has its own worries. “They’re in a tough position because Facebook users prefer posts from their friends and family, but at the same time Facebook has become an absolutely critical source of traffic for news organisations. And Facebook’s business is selling ads.”

So, I asked him, is Facebook trying to distance itself from being treated as a news publisher itself by regulators worried about fake news and foreign political interference? “Facebook did sort of stumble into being the main distributor of news on the planet Earth by accident,” said Benton. “I think a lot of folks at Facebook would be happy if this was just something they didn’t have to worry about.”

Meanwhile Adam Mosseri, Facebook’s head of News Feed, tried to calm frayed nerves. “There is no current plan to roll this out beyond these test countries or to charge pages on Facebook to pay for all their distribution in News Feed or Explore,” he wrote in a blog. But perhaps his use of the word “current” won’t allay every publisher’s fears.

 

The world in 2027

In Internet on 27/10/2017 at 5:45 pm

No “smart homes” and driverless cars in cities.

From http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-41694991

Back in 2001 a book called “The Future of Wireless Communications” predicted the following technology developments by 2020:

  • A personal communicator that would book flights and allow you to check in at airports.
  • A personalised news feed delivered to your communicator.
  • A robot that mows the grass.
  • A function allowing you to pre-order your cappuccino from a coffee chain and then direct you to its location.

Those predictions look pretty accurate and now the book’s author, William Webb, a telecoms consultant, is publishing his vision of how the world will look in 10 years.

His predictions include:

  • Virtual assistants like Siri or Alexa will play bigger roles in our lives.
  • AI will have become extremely good at specific tasks.
  • In the workplace facial-recognition technology replaces security staff and robot vacuum cleaners take away cleaning jobs.
  • Retailing will be almost entirely online.

But mostly he is very cautious about the pace of change. He does not believe we will all have smart homes – “the benefits are not that great but the price is quite substantial” – and he is not convinced that autonomous cars will soon be cutting congestion in cities.

“It’s a nice vision,” he says. “I think we will see a very limited autonomy. In 10 years we might well see cars on the motorways but I don’t think we will see that in city centres – it’s just too complicated.”

And as for general artificial intelligence able to complete a variety of tasks, he thinks that is a long way off.

We are told that technology is advancing at breakneck speed. But if William Webb is right it may take something of a breather over the next decade.

Oh and in S’pore PAP still in power much to the frustration of the anti-PAP cybernuts who lost their nest when TRE closed because the cybernuts were too cheapskate to fund it. TeamTRE got tired of being taken for a ride by the cybernuts.

Xi’s an interner sui kee

In China, Internet on 25/10/2017 at 4:29 pm

Mr Xi has

more power than any Chinese leader since Mao Zedong. He is the first living leader to be mentioned in the party’s charter since Mao.

https://www.economist.com/news/china/21730590-does-mean-no-one-can-challenge-him-xi-jinpings-thinking-ranked-alongside-maos

But he and China were nowhere to be found last week when

Tech giants Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter and Google have agreed to do more to remove extremist content within hours of it being posted.

The accord was decided at a two-day meeting between the G7 nations and the tech firms, hosted on the Italian island of Ischia.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-41693777

Where’s China, Alibaba and Tencent? Not tua kee enough isit?

Xi and Jack Ma and the head of Tencent must be banging their balls balls that despite China’s billions of internet users it and its  leading cos are not an internet super power, unlike Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States, and Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter and Google.

They just like Putin and Russia: internet pygmies.

Ever wondered this about PM’s Facebook posts?

In Internet on 25/09/2017 at 1:12 pm

How many people “help” him post stuff, and monitor and moderate comments?

I came across this on NYT’s Dealbook

[Mark Zuckerberg] proceeds to complain about a Bloomberg Businessweek story in January that noted he employs a team of about a dozen content moderators — as well as communications managers, professional photographers, video producers, Morgan Freeman — who are all responsible for maintaining his personal Facebook page. “You’re taking away from all the time that I spent on this,” he says.

Coming back to PM, I doubt his FB team is that big.

But who pays for the team? Us the taxpayers because his FB posts are part of his duties as PM? Or himself or the PAP because the posts are political in nature? If some posts are political and the others are concerned with his duties as PM, how is the split decided and by whom? Ownself decide ownself?

Whatever, on his salary and personal wealth (especially his inheritance) he can pay for his “help”himself. Just like Mark Zuckerberg can. But do they?

Tan CJ story shows new media too is BS

In Internet on 07/09/2017 at 1:08 pm

There’s a lot about speculation about Tan CJ’s demotion in cyberspace. But kee chui those pontificators who knew that he had a rare form of TB, and was cleared of TB in 2015 before they strutted their stuff? There’s an ST article. Goggle it up.

I can only raise my hand a little because I wrote this. I vaguely remembered he had been seriously ill recently but hadn’t bothered to google the issue because I wanted to go meditate.

But other better staffed and resourced publications should have done their research. I mean mothership had three writers writing one piece (Btw, it was pure BS so I’m not linking to it.) but they obviously didn’t know that he was seriously ill only a few yrs back. Makes me think that this publication, allegedly funded by Philip Yeo (Remember him?) after George Yeo (Remember him?) pitched to him is the Chinese twin to the “Indians”.

And then there was his much ridiculed comment about old women telling him they were were collecting cardboard “for exercise”. It was so easy for the anti-PAP websites to verify if this was not true, and that they needed the money. But none did. All they had to do was to ask the old women as he had identified where they were operating from.

It’s difficult to do investigative journalism here (juz ask Terry’s Online Channel). But in this case, it was so easy.

But maybe someone did ask the women, and found that they were really exercising. So better to keep quiet about the truth?

“When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.”

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

NYT discovers that Chinese internet firms are big

In China, Internet on 22/08/2017 at 2:16 pm

Can’t stop laughing that this fan of Hilary Clinton and hater of The Donald (he returns the hate) has only just discovered the existence of big Chinese internet firms.

From NYT Dealbook

The new Silicon Valley may be in China.
America’s technology giants have new neighbors as the Chinese companies Alibaba Group and Tencent Holdings have quickly become darlings of global investors by dominating their home market.
Alibaba and Tencent are among the world’s most highly valued public companies, with market capitalizations twice as big as the longtime tech leaders Intel, Cisco and IBM.
They have joined an elite club of tech companies worth $400 billion and up that has been dominated by American businesses: Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google and Microsoft.
“We’ve come to the point where China has finally caught up with the U.S. in the internet space,” said Hans Tung, a managing partner at the venture capital firm GGV Capital.
Alibaba and Tencent have grown to prominence by dominating e-commerce and online life in China, the world’s largest internet market. Their growth has come as Western companies, such as Facebook, have been blocked by the country’s tight internet controls.
This week, Alibaba and Tencent reported financial results that were well ahead of analysts’ expectations and point to the growing influence of technology on the Chinese economy.
Tencent is expected to soon become the only company other than Facebook to have a social network with more than a billion users, while Alibaba has more than 500 million monthly active users for its online shopping apps. The Chinese companies’ revenue also grew at a faster pace in the past three months than at Facebook and Alphabet, the parent company of Google.

Smart Nation: It’s all about Big Brudder watching us

In Economy, Infrastructure, Internet, Political governance, Public Administration on 24/04/2017 at 2:45 pm

True the BBC in  http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-39641262 can come across as constructive and nation-building as ST but three cheers to the BBC for pointing that the way the PAP administration does things is a major problem for the Smart Nation initiative:

Harminder Singh, a senior lecturer in business information systems at the Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand, says the main issue with Smart Nation is that there may be too much government control over it right now for real innovation to take place.

“Singapore’s way of doing things is that the government leads, then others follow,” he told me. “This might be a problem – it is too centralised and so it may take too long for plans to trickle down.

“And ideas from the ground may be neither visible to those on top nor acceptable to them, especially if they are related to the delivery of services that are traditionally handled by the government.”

But he’s very cock in saying

it is not clear why Singapore’s leaders are so keen to move full steam ahead with this plan.

Ah ya no need to explain. It’s all about making sure Big Brother can keep on watching S’poreans. But he’s right to say that we don’t know “how the Smart Nation project will improve salaries and jobs”

“Smart Nation is about building national technology infrastructure so that the government can offer new services, or do what they do now differently. The government may need to explain more clearly how the Smart Nation project will improve salaries and jobs in Singapore to get the project moving faster.”

 

Why there wouldn’t be a Trump here

In Internet on 05/12/2016 at 5:56 pm

Twitter usage here sucks, really sucks

https://www.statista.com/statistics/284466/singapore-social-network-penetration/

The funny thing is that Indons (juz across the water) love to use Twitter https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2016/nov/21/twitter-city-facebook-jakarta-live-week-social-media-obsession-

This appeared three yrs ago on usage here and there’s been no update on the number of users.

https://vulcanpost.com/10812/many-twitter-users-singapore/

 

Social media: Ang mohs and Chinese are different

In Internet on 24/11/2016 at 2:38 pm

In China, Millienals have no issues allowing their social media activities (contacts and payments) to be used to judge their creditworthiness. In fact those with very high credit worthiness flaunt this fact on social media.

Having a credit score and showing it off to one’s friends is now something of a status marker for the affluent young. Sesame Credit has teamed up with Baihe, China’s largest dating service, to encourage users to flaunt their credit scores on their dating profiles.

But in the West:

In 2014 Facebook began toying with using social media to gauge users’ credit. But it called the plan off in February 2016, citing regulatory concerns. Critics thought it creepy.

Read more at http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21710292-chinas-consumer-credit-rating-culture-evolving-fastand-unconventionally-just

 

Fintech round the world

In Banks, Internet on 19/11/2016 at 6:15 am
Lawrence Tang of Invest Hong Kong at the recent Money 2020 fintech conference in Las Vegas. “We are at the right place to try to capture some of these high-flying fintech companies,” he said.

Where Finance and Technology Come Together

The new industry mixing finance and technology has no clear capital, but major international cities and lesser ones are vying to attract companies.

Facebook squeeze on anti-PAP sites continues

In Internet on 04/11/2016 at 9:24 am

Facebook warned on Wednesday that revenue growth could slow next year sending its shares into a tail spin.

One way to increase revenue as the FT reports is to squeeze those who use it for free to attract people to their sites and hence to ads.

Facebook has 4m advertisers, but 60m businesses use Facebook pages for free. If even a small proportion of those could be persuaded to pay to promote their posts, prices would go up.

FT

As I reported earlier our two mainstream anti-PAP alternative media sites have been affected by FB’s recent tweaks in how it promotes stuff.

[I]t more favorably promotes content posted by the friends and family of users, not publishers (Our anti-PAP sites, like all socio-political sites are considered publishers or news sites by Facebook).

The squeeze continues for them when FB makes life more difficult for the freeloaders.

I’m sure Terry’s Online Channel (TOC) will sutvive because Terry and others there work for free or for peanuts, and because it has the goodwill of the influencers of the online community. But at the The Idiots — S’pore (TISG) which claims it’s out to make money, lots of it, even though it had to recapitalise itself last year, things are different. It has no goodwill left among the influencers after its xenophobic stuff or articles that were more fiction than fact.

The internet giveth and then takes away.

But internet taketh away then giveth too

In the US

The Neighborhood Bookstore’s Unlikely Ally? The Internet

Mom-and-pop bookstores are emerging from the decimation of the last decade as they use social media to inspire a loyal customer base.

NYT Dealbook

And in India, Grofers is providing a grocery delivery service, relying on the traditional mom and pop (kirana) stores. And Amazon is testing such a system too in India. Meanwhile, 10i Commercial Services has a service enabling customers to place orders for goods not stocked locally, via a smart device belonging to a Indian local shop.

 

 

Anti-PAP sites lose traffic after Facebook tweaks algos

In Internet on 24/10/2016 at 4:47 am

Is Mark Zuckerberg sucking up to the PAP as part of his efforts to suck up to China ala Duterte?

Two tua kee socio-political sites (even though one says it’s a commercial news agency cum loudhailer for the govt and its agencies and not a socio-political site) are heavily dependent on Facebook to push out (“promote”) their stuff and so help them get views and ad revenue. Their readers are too cheap skate or really that poor? Or not willing to pay for BS even when they consume it avidly?

This reliance on Facebook was especially useful post the GE when readership fell across the board affecting ad income. Problem is that Facebook has tweaked its algorithms (as it does periodically).

It’s latest tweak in June means that it more favorably promotes content posted by the friends and family of users, not publishers (Our anti-PAP sites, like all socio-political sites are considered publishers or news sites by Facebook).

It says that content posted by publishers will show up less prominently in news feeds, resulting in significantly less traffic to the hundreds of news media sites that have come to rely on Facebook.

This means that these sites get less traffic, a lot less. And a lot loss viewers and even less ad revenue.

NYT in June reported:

Facebook said it expected a drop in reach and referral traffic for publishers whose audience comes primarily to content posted by the publisher’s official Facebook page. Facebook plans to start making the changes as soon as this week.

It will have less of an impact, however, if most of a publisher’s traffic comes from individual users sharing and commenting on their stories and videos. As has long been the case, publisher content that your friends interact with will appear higher in the feed compared to posts shared directly by a publisher.

Actually any third-party stuff on the publishers’ FB pages also gets fewer pushes

What this means is that when Chris K  posts something of mine on his FB page, I’ll get a lot more hits than if it’s posted by ownself on SGDaily’s Facbook page: better promotion by FB. No wonder Daniel Yap of TMG is pushing out a lot more TMG pieces on his personal FB wall. Smart man.

Maybe Terry should be doing the same for TOC? And Ravi for TISG when it runs constructive, nation-building, loudhailing stuff that S’poreans really need to know.

And pay Chris K to push out their stuff. After all both publications use him to attract the cybernuts even though he’s no nut. He’s a pensioner. Either that or persude him to do NS and promote their pieces for free.

Or pay FB to promote their stuff. FB is happy to push if it’s paid to promote.

Money talks.

And yes I’m simplifying what the tweaks are doing and why FB is doing what is it doing.

Minister wants his cake and eat it/ PAP doesn’t get the Internet

In Internet, Political governance on 26/09/2016 at 5:24 am

But first what the PAP doesn’t get about the Internet :

In this internet era where many are literate, the government and their ministries are still assuming that people reach out to them to get info, which are already available on the net. It’s time they learn that the public reach out to them to get action, solution not info.

Coming back to the minister, my avatar responded to a post by Daniel Yap of TMG who had responded to a minister’s BS excusing his failure (“We can’t do miracles”) (Btw, my post on Accountability the PAP way posted yesterday)

Nope. A govt that tries to micromanage and social engineer its citizens has to accept that the other side of the coin “is the expectation that the G can make anything happen. LOL”.

Daniel Yap had posted

One of the side effects of big government is the expectation that the G can make anything happen. LOL

Image may contain: tree, sky, plant, outdoor and nature

Tan Chuan-JinLike Page

Some of you ask me about issues we deal with. This is one. We have an ongoing dispute between two neighbours about a tree between their two properties. W asked

See More

Two other good comments were

Our G wants us to think like consumers during elections with “vote us to get…”; but after elections, they want us to think like citizens in term of a civil society? It’s very hard to do so. 🙁

There is an expectation that the G comes in and lay down the law instead of mediate. Instant results over dialogue, understanding, and trade offs.

And
Too bad, PAP founders created the myth, now they can’t keep up.
Then there was this really totful comment about how MND works and how the internet has changed people’s expectations (People want action, solutions, not info):

There are lots of areas that the public assume the authorities are in control but they are not even monitoring at all. That leads to the great disillusion when the public realise their government ineffectiveness.

Worse, recently i heard MND’s intention to decentralise control and the joke is they delegate the jobs to those not qualified… nearly fainted when i heard their rationale. It’s incredible, their assumption and naivety.

MND should set up its own “police team” to manage all building related disputes, be it involving developers, contractors, owners, tenants etc. Many people are resorting to MPS and SPF that cant do a thing, wasting MP resources, reducing the SPF to mere scouts, trying to pacify and take notes and exasperating the affected residents.

In this internet era where many are literate, the government and their ministries are still assuming that people reach out to them to get info, which are already available on the net. It’s time they learn that the public reach out to them to get action, solution not info. TCJ needs to feedback to MND to get its house in order, all the loopholes covered and manage all these issues proactively. It’s meaningless to go through these again and again. Imagine 81 MPs handle 10 such cases each, thats 810 weekly…

Why access to the truth has not set S’poreans free

In Internet on 20/09/2016 at 5:12 am

Knowledge is supposed to be power in one-party states and the internet gives people access to knowledge. But the internet has not done much to change S’poreans’ views of the PAP and its manifold, snarky machinations.

It was thought that the PAP administration’s control of the mainstream media was an important element in preventing S’poreans from understanding the reality of PAP rule here. The constructive, nation-building media helped shape the perception of reality by, among other things, filtering out inconvenient facts and framing the issues in a way that put the best spin on PAP policies.


Why PAP keeps a tight grip on the MSM

only suggestive, the study is cause for concern. The media can set the agenda, but also distort it. There is some countervailing evidence, that relative rankings of corruption do have some validity: diplomats from countries where corruption is seen as more pervasive are less likely to pay parking fines, for example. But if perceptions are heavily influenced by the media buzz, then levels of corruption might be exaggerated. In other words, measures of corruption could themselves be corrupted.

http://www.economist.com/news/business-and-finance/21696162-perceptions-corruption-seem-be-more-sensitive-claims-facts-bad-press

Also read this article about how media owners in Eastern Europe’s use the media they own to manipulate public opinion and to help friendly politicians and u can understand why the PAP controls the MSM the way it does here. http://www.economist.com/…/21707125-politics-central-and-ea…

———————————————————-

So those opposed to the PAP’s hegemony (self included) had thought that the internet (in particular social media and new or alternative media) would make it easier for S’poreans to be aware of or learn of or ferret out inconvenient facts, learn the truth, and draw the “right” conclusions.

It’s now easier to be aware of or learn of or ferret out inconvenient facts, and learn the truth, but sadly many S’poreans still are incapable of or resist drawing the “right” conclusions.

Partly this is the fault of alternative media outlets like The Idiots — S’pore (Or TISG as it prefers to be known which at times seems to be trying to imitate fake news websites ), the antics of the anti-PAP cynernut rats, and pro -PAP outlets like Mothership and FATPAP. Their disinformation and loudhailing services for the PAP causes problems when trying to establish the facts or the truth. (In fact TISG is proud that it is a “useful loudhailer” for the govt and its agencies.)

But a lot has to do with human nature (emphasis mine):

[H]umans do not naturally seek truth. In fact, as plenty of research shows, they tend to avoid it. People instinctively accept information to which they are exposed and must work actively to resist believing falsehoods; they tend to think that familiar information is true; and they cherry-pick data to support their existing views. At the root of all these biases seems to be what Daniel Kahneman, a Nobel-prizewinning psychologist and author of a bestselling book, “Thinking, Fast and Slow”, calls “cognitive ease”: humans have a tendency to steer clear of facts that would force their brains to work harder.

In some cases confronting people with correcting facts even strengthens their beliefs, a phenomenon Brendan Nyhan and Jason Reifler, now of Dartmouth College and the University of Exeter, respectively, call the “backfire effect”. In a study in 2010 they randomly presented participants either with newspaper articles which supported widespread misconceptions about certain issues, such as the “fact” that America had found weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, or articles including a correction. Subjects in both groups were then asked how strongly they agreed with the misperception that Saddam Hussein had such weapons immediately before the war, but was able to hide or destroy them before American forces arrived.

As might be expected, liberals who had seen the correction were more likely to disagree than liberals who had not seen the correction. But conservatives who had seen the correction were even more convinced that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. Further studies are needed, Mr Nyhan and Mr Reifler say, to see whether conservatives are indeed more prone to the backfire effect.

http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21706498-dishonesty-politics-nothing-new-manner-which-some-politicians-now-lie-and?fsrc=permar|image3

The good news is that so long as there are sites like TOC (Its 10th anniversary fell in August this year), TMG and SgDaily (I got posting rights on its FB page); bloggers and commenters like Alex Au, Chris K, Wandering Vagabond, P Ravi, Uncle Leong, Donald Low and Yeoh Lum Keong; and cyber Jedis like Terry Xu and Andrew of TRE, inconvenient facts and inconvenient truths cannot be kept out of the public domain.

So I’m optimistic. Slowly but surely more S’poreans will draw the “right” conclusions after learning the “right” facts. And with a bit of luck by 2033 or 2055, at the latest, Harry will only be a bad dream.

But as S’poreans are exposed to more info, we (including the PAP) face a problem in this brave new world

Given such biases, it is somewhat surprising that people can ever agree on facts, particularly in politics. But many societies have developed institutions which allow some level of consensus over what is true: schools, science, the legal system, the media. This truth-producing infrastructure, though, is never close to perfect: it can establish as truth things for which there is little or no evidence; it is constantly prey to abuse by those to whom it grants privileges; and, crucially, it is slow to build but may be quick to break.

http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21706498-dishonesty-politics-nothing-new-manner-which-some-politicians-now-lie-and?fsrc=permar|image3

Remember that given the dominance of the PAP, we don’t have the institutions which allow some level of consensus, absent the hegemony of the PAP. It’s going to be an anarchic jungle when S’poreans break the mind fetters.

But not to worry, the ang mohs who S’poreans (including the PAP) use to validate their actions will still be pontificating and BSing, and sometimes getting the facts and truth right. And S’poreans will listen to them, as they always have. Ang mohs will take the place of local institutions in the building of consensus of what are the facts and the truth.

Still better than consensus based on the PAP’s hegemony. At least liberal, socialistic and conservative ang mohs hold different views.

Hard Truths on connecting with the 70%

In Internet, Media on 16/09/2016 at 6:10 am

Activists (anti-PAP, Oppo, alternative views or social) must realise or be aware that

— The 70% (especially the swing voter, 35% of the voters ) know what they are doing when they vote for the PAP; and

— that some anti-PAP, alternative etc views are more equal than others i.e. the cybernuts must not be given the space to talk cock, sing song. They must not be given publicity, and rebutted.

WP knows these Hard Truths and have used this knowledge to win and hold Aljunied GRC. Trouble is that others don’t. Yes, I thinking particularly of Mad Dog. (And sadly, retaining Aljunied was all the WP was interested in until recently.)

Voters know what they are doing

Those who think the decisions voters make are ignorant or even irrational do them a disservice. The judgments rendered by the electorate are sometimes misinformed, and often harsh, but rarely irrational …

Many experts on the issue despair at the ignorance voters display: they seem hopelessly wrong about the numbers coming, the reasons they come and the impact they have on the economy. Yet although they are muddled on the details, voters are remarkably responsive on the big picture. Concern about the issue tracks numbers closely: when migrant numbers go up, more voters cite it as a concern. Voters noticed the pledges by successive governments to bring numbers down, they noticed when these pledges failed, and they noticed that one important reason for that failure was rising immigration from the EU. The growing number of voters who wanted immigration reduced drew the logical conclusions from all of this: the old parties had failed on the issue, so they turned to a new one (Ukip); controlling migration looked close to impossible within the EU, so they voted to leave.

This pattern of behaviour – ignorant about the details, but responsive on the big picture – is one we see quite often. It has a lot to recommend it. When a room gets too cold, we respond by turning up the heating. When the room gets too hot, we turn it off. We usually manage to do this without knowing the precise temperature. Voters often display a similar thermostatic logic. Of course, voters aren’t consistently rational even on the big picture stuff. But usually when they apparently go off the rails, there is an interesting logic underlying what they do, throwing light on the strengths and weaknesses of how we reason more generally.

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/aug/27/secret-life-of-british-voters-revealed

In the S’pore context this translates into as Chris K commented in response to this post

Slightly less the oppo but the social activists and their non nutty cyberspace allies are framing the free and liberal society in terms of ideals of human rights, civil society and democratic process. IMHO this don’t work in the peculiarly utilitarian mindset of the voters, shaped by one party rule. The free and liberal society needs to be framed in terms of access to public goods and redistribution, the nuts n bolts or bread n butter of that kind of society. Singapore is no totalitarian state, the social activists n their non nutty cyberspace allies take the easier route of wearing their hearts on their sleeves but this is putting the cart in front of the horse.

The SDP has a set of policy proposals that tries to frame its arguments for a “free and liberal society” in  “terms of access to public goods and redistribution, the nuts n bolts or bread n butter of that kind of society.”. The problem is that 60- 70% of S’poreans have problems with Dr Chee’s history and character. Sad really that Dr Chee refuses to retire.

Why not publicising the cybernuts is a must

Not all anti-PAP, alternate views are equal. Some are more equal than others. The editors of alternative media and activists who are influencers must curate wisely. Allow the likes of Chris K, Donald Low and Yeoh Lum Keong free rein, but don’t spread the views of nutters like Roy Ngerng, Philip Ang and M Ravi.

The nutters taint those rational S’poreans who want change, making it easier for the PAP to persuade the swing voters that anyone who wants change must be as nuts as M Ravi.

And rebut them or get others to rebut them, even though the time spent on this activity can be seen like doing NS, the time can ne better used to inform and persuade the swing voters, a difficult task which I will post on next week. One way to look at rebutting is that it helps built up cred with the swing voter.

—————————–

once a solid consensus has been reached through thorough testing, this must take precedence in responsible media discussion: as he says, “it would not be impartial, but irresponsible to give a smoking enthusiast equal time with the Chief Medical Officer or Surgeon General”.

The media’s dysfunctionality is structural. They must get audiences — public service broadcasters are increasingly exposed to that imperative — and they seek them, like politicians, in the privileging of emotion and personal experience. During the MMR vaccine debate, in which one rogue and inaccurate article on the dangers of the vaccine led to an insistent press campaign, interventions of “I’m just a mom and I want to keep my baby safe” could have more force than the arguments of the scientific establishment, especially if the latter were obscurely framed or contemptuously delivered.

In one of his many dissections of an anti-scientific consensus position, Thompson takes a statement from the social anthropologist Benny Peiser, director of Global Warming Policy Foundation, a sceptical climate change think-tank. In 2011 Peiser had argued: “Fundamentally these are social, ethical and economic questions that cannot be answered by science alone but require careful consideration by economists and social commentators.” It sounds broad-minded until you realise what the word “fundamentally” implies: as Thompson puts it, “that the layer of policy consideration which addresses social, ethical and economical questions is somehow weightier or more critical than the scientific layer”.

Yet the veracity of the scientific consensus is the determinant of the whole issue: everything else, including the ethical dimension, hinges entirely on it. You either believe that the scientific community, for all its neglect of comprehensible speech, has evolved a trustworthy discipline of verification through robust challenge — or you do not, in which case you must take some time to advance a reasonable case as to why. “I’m just a mom” doesn’t make the cut.

The former director-general criticises those of his former BBC colleagues who insist on absolute balance, even if it goes to the point where a sage must be countered by an idiot. The issue has moved some of those who voted Remain in the June referendum on the UK’s European Union membership, who argue that distinguished economists were given equal time with undistinguished shopkeepers: a complaint that might not have surfaced had the close result been reversed. Thompson wrote too early for that debate, but does argue that once a solid consensus has been reached through thorough testing, this must take precedence in responsible media discussion: as he says, “it would not be impartial, but irresponsible to give a smoking enthusiast equal time with the Chief Medical Officer or Surgeon General”.

(Emphasis mine)

Extract from FT review of Enough Said: What’s Gone Wrong With the Language of Politics?, by Mark Thompson, Bodley Head, RRP£25 / St Martin’s Press, RRP$27.95, 384 pages

The author  of the extract is John Lloyd. He is an FT contributing editor and a co-founder of Oxford university’s Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

—————————————————

 

Why Goldie wants to be the people’s bank

In Banks, Internet, Investment banking on 29/08/2016 at 3:26 pm

The maths behind Goldman Sachs move into retail internet finance

As it has done many times in its past to survive and to thrive, Goldman is in the process of reinvention. This explains Marcus, its new online lending business named after the company’s founder, Marcus Goldman, along with GS Bank, its online savings account business with no minimum balance requirements. After all these years, Goldman Sachs has suddenly discovered retail banking. But it is not out of altruism or charity, nor is it nefarious. It is all about making money from money, which has always been Goldman’s specialty. In fact, GS Bank and Marcus fit together elegantly in helping Goldman find new sources of profitability.

And here’s why: In the zero-interest-rate environment that the Federal Reserve has carefully curated for eight years, Goldman and other banks can gather up money — the raw material they use to make more money — at virtually no cost. By opening an online bank, Goldman can gather up billions of dollars in consumer deposits without the cost of a physical branch and pay its customers close to nothing for their money. Goldman is offering to pay savers 1.05 percent annually. That may sound like close to zero, and it is, but the rate is also nearly 17 times more than the 0.06 percent annual interest rate that JPMorgan pays me on my savings account.

Goldman’s idea is to get people like me to move my money, of course. Sure, the 1.05 percent is a teaser rate, created to attract billions of dollars to Goldman’s new venture. And it will no doubt work. Since April, GS Bank has collected $1.8 billion in deposits, essentially by word of mouth.

Goldman will then take that raw material and use it to make more money, in large part by lending it out through its online lender Marcus, which aims at consumers looking to borrow around $20,000. Goldman will charge plenty more in interest for these loans than the 1 percent it is paying savers at GS Bank. Although its terms will not be known until Marcus rolls out officially in October, assume for the moment that the going rate for consumer loans of this nature – if both Lending Club and Prosper are useful guides – is around 12 percent. That difference – the 11 percentage points – is what Goldman will largely rake in as profit.

Experiment that failed in Japan, being tried here

In Internet, Public Administration on 28/08/2016 at 4:24 am

It’s really hard to believe that Yaacob is an RI boy, I mean RI boys are supposed to be smart, not stupid. OK, OK I know he’s Minister for Communications and Information, Minister-incharge of Muslim Affairs and Minister in charge of Cyber Security. But Minister in charge of Cyber Security, ne’s trying out something here that failed in Japan.

William Saito, a special cyber security adviser to the Japanese government, said some Japanese companies had cut internet access in the past year, usually after a breach. “They cut themselves off because they thought it was a good idea,” he said, “but then they realised they were pretty dependent on this internet thing.”

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/aug/24/singapore-to-cut-off-public-servants-from-the-internet

Let’s see if the PAP administration can succeed where the Japanese cos failed.

Digital detoxers’ experiences

In Internet on 07/08/2016 at 4:33 am

More than a third of UK’s surveyed internet users  try digital detoxing, some for a month. Table fronm FT.

Digital detox survey charts

Indons speaking with fork tongues again

In Environment, Internet on 25/07/2016 at 1:14 pm

Indon VP asking for neighbours’ help in fighting the fires. But he seems to have forgotten that Indon officials have said they don’t need help.

Worse, while complaining that S’pore was trying to punish Indon cos for the fires, it has stopped investigating them

Indonesia’s efforts in tackling forest fires came into question when 15 out of 18 companies suspected of being responsible for the forest fires last year got off the hook with the law.

On Thursday, detik.com reported that the district police in Riau will be stopping investigations on the 15 companies due to the lack of evidence.

“It does not fulfil the elements of intent nor negligence, so we decide to stop investigating the cases,” said Senior Commissioner Rivai Sinambela, Director for Special Criminal Investigation, Riau police district.

Commissioner Rival said that the fires happened on land which have conflicting ownership with the community, and not on areas belonging to the companies.

In 2015, police began investigations on 18 companies suspected of causing forest fires, but only three went to the courts. The three companies PT Langgam Inti Hibrindo, PT Palm Lestari Makmur and PT Wahana Subur Sawit were eventually acquitted.

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/indonesia-calls-on/2980490.html

Good reason to ban smartphones

In Internet on 17/07/2016 at 1:05 pm

Here I suggested that the PAP administration should ban the use of smartphone cameras because they are a clear and present danger to the PAP’s paternal instinct to ensure that we only get the “right” info (So that, among other things, we are not panicked.)

Here’s a good reason why the PAP administration should go further and ban smartphones.

Indian newspaper The Telegraph ran a fascinating exclusive on its front page yesterday.

It obtained a copy of an investigation into Kashmiri militancy written by a top police officer in the state.

The report, which has been presented to officials at the home Ministry, argues that growing access to social media is the key to understanding the current upsurge in militancy in the region.

[I]n the last few years the security forces in Kashmir have noticed that the public is now far more likely to intervene in their operations.

He reports that when they go to make an arrest or get involved in even a minor confrontation with militants, very quickly members of the public come out to protest against their action and, on occasion, even attack them.

One factor has to be that smartphone messages go out alerting people to what is going on.

As far as security personnel are concerned this represents a very serious increase in the risks they face.

Just like during the Arab Spring and indeed in the unfolding race crisis in America, it seems the contours of the conflict in Kashmir are increasingly being shaped and defined by technology.

Traingate: The only cyberwarriors LTA, MoT responded to

In Internet, Media on 15/07/2016 at 6:55 am

Trumpets please for SgDaily and Joel Koh, the new kids on the block in Blogosphere S’pore

LTA in the presence of, MoT, Khaw, answered the question that only SgDaily’s Joel Koh asked in public: What happens to service reliability and timings?*

There was no correlation to train delays of more than five minutes to the hairline cracks, LTA said at the briefing. It indicated that most of the delays since 2014 were linked to signalling faults, door or brake issues, with none linked to hairline cracks.

The authority added that even when trains were being repaired, there were always enough trains to meet demand.

For example, for 2016, there are 140 trains available for the North-South and East-West lines, and 124 trains are needed to meet demand. This will continue till 2019 – when replacement work is completed – where there will always be more trains available than needed, according to estimates.

(CNA)

Declaration of interest; My Facebook avatar can post stuff on SgDaily’s FB wall.

———————————-

*Yes no other blogger or website or activist or Oppo party asked publicly how the cracks affected train service. And neither did the running dogs** from SPH or MediaCorp asked.

So all but two guard dogs were asleep, just like their running dog cousins. Groupthink at its very best.

**Yes my dogs are getting extra treats for this insult to the K9 community.

Silence of SMRT, LTA & MoT explained

In Internet on 11/07/2016 at 7:40 am

In my own opinion, they should have disclosed it. Everyone has their reasons, but in the end there’s always consequences. Daniel Yap of TMG in a FB post when introducing this piece he wrote http://themiddleground.sg/2016/07/07/faulty-trains-tell-not-tell/

Piece is worth a read, explaining why it would have been better for the authorities to have disclosed the cracks and the remedial action: they would then have controlled the news agenda.

But this analysis and other criticisms of the silence miss the point.

PAPpies brains work differently: when the public doesn’t know a fact, that fact never exists.

In 2011, I analysed a senior PAPpy’s and his team’s  unhappiness with a TOC report.

I wrote, they must believe in an 18th century philosophical theory that is now treated as a forerunner of the concept of “subjective idealism”. One Bishop Berkeley argued that there are no material objects, only minds and ideas in those minds. He summarised his theory with the motto “esse est percipi” (“To be is to be perceived”). In modern PR-speak, this translates into,“Perception is reality”, one of the major tenets of the PR and public communication industry.

This theory of “Perception is reality” is best summarised in the following example he gave. If a tree in a forest falls, but no-one sees or hears it fall, has it fallen? Berkeley argues that it has not fallen. It is still standing.

An example in the S’pore context would be that S’poreans were not aware of how close the voting would be on polling day in 1988 in Eunos GRC and in Cheng San GRC in 1991. The mainstream media did not report the sentiment on the ground in these two GRCs, so S’poreans were not aware that many S’poreans were unhappy with the PAP. The unhappiness did not exist because it was not reported.

https://atans1.wordpress.com/2011/08/01/%E2%80%9Clittle-disappointment%E2%80%9D-tony-tan-to-toc/

Coming back to Traingate. SMRT, the LTA and MoT kept quiet because they like Bishop Berkeley believe that “Perception is reality”. So long as the public did not know that there were cracks in the 26 China-made trains, and that the trains had been returned for repairs, there were no train cracks. There were no cracked trains because If a tree in a forest falls, but no-one sees or hears it fall, has it fallen? Berkeley argues that it has not fallen. It is still standing.

What they still don’t realise that in this age of social media and the internet where many people walk around with smartphone cameras, If a tree in a forest falls, someone will see it or hear it fall. And tell others about the falling tree, after taking a selfie beside the fallen tree.

This being the case, disclosure of problems or cock-ups, not cover-ups or silence should be the best (and default) policy for the authorities and corporations They should assume that news of the cock-up or problem will become public knowledge and that by disclosing, the news agenda can, hopefully, be controlled..

But in one-party states, silence or cover-up are the default options, not disclosure. And this is the weakness of one-party states where people carry smartphone cameras. The one-party state will, in time, be undermined.

Ban smartphone cameras PAP? After all internet access for public servants will soon be restricted in this wired, connected nation.