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Posts Tagged ‘CCP’

“Nine” not “Eight” is unlucky for Xi

In China on 24/12/2018 at 10:43 am

Why “Nine” is his and the CCP’s unlucky number.

China gets nervous about the number nine. Years ending in nine bring a clutch of awkward anniversaries that worry China’s leaders. In 2019 it is 100 years since the May Fourth Movement, a much-celebrated protest, and 30 years since the bloody suppression of student-led demonstrations in Tiananmen Square.

https://worldin2019.economist.com/fromtheeditor

The fully monty: https://worldin2019.economist.com/xijinpingsworries

 

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PAP’s thinking is Xi’s thinking

In China, Political governance on 09/11/2018 at 10:05 am

Further to What next? Senior civil servant saying that those who don’t vote PAP don’t wish S’pore well? where I quoted our London ambassador sneering at the ang moh way of alternating opposing parties in power

The alternative—a constant merry-go-round of contending parties—does not necessarily produce better outcomes. Politicians fail to keep the promises they make, the people become disillusioned, and eventually lose faith in democracy. Witness the low voter-turnouts in many Western democracies.

Doesn’t this sound like u/m?

Chinese leaders are too cynical about elections in the democratic West, and about the lessons that even messy campaigns can offer. They are not cynical enough about their own authoritarian system, refusing to see how it induces a sort of democracy-blindness. Even well-informed officials and scholars misread political dynamics around the world.

https://www.economist.com/china/2018/10/20/china-is-misreading-western-populism

Related posts:  Keeping power in a one-party state and Would this happen in a one-party state?

 

 

Prosperity with S’porean, Chinese characteristics

In China, Media on 26/07/2018 at 10:56 am

Unique to both China and S’pore

Further to Bang yr balls ang moh tua kees

The case for a free press rests not only on classical liberal principles but also on hard data. Cross-country studies show strong and consistent associations between unfettered media, vibrant democracies and limited corruption. China, which has a tightly controlled media and perhaps the world’s most sophisticated censorship scheme, thinks it has proven that prosperity can be achieved without a free press. In less extreme fashion, Singapore shares similar authoritarian attitudes. Politicians everywhere do not much like to be criticised. To a worrying number of them, this Singapore model—or Beijing model, depending on preference—can prove more attractive than the Western approach of putting up with a pesky press.

https://www.economist.com/graphic-detail/2018/07/23/the-global-slump-in-press-freedom

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Keeping power in a one-party state