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Posts Tagged ‘Chinese banks’

Our world class Chinese banks need US$50-500bn more in capital

In Banks, China, Temasek on 12/09/2013 at 4:56 am

This blog has been pointing out why ang mohs don’t like Chinese banks, while Temasek loves them.

This short video shows the strengths of Chinese banks in size and income from interest (Big 4 in global top 10). The latter must surely be a consideration in why Temasek invests in three of them.

http://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2013/09/daily-chart-1

Now back to the worrying analysis:

— With bad loans and competition rising, China’s largest banks face tougher times ahead. ChinaScope Financial, a research firm partly owned by Moody’s, a ratings agency, has analysed how declining net interest margins will affect China’s banks. It estimates that the sector will need an injection of $50 billion-100 billion over the next two years just to keep its capital ratios at today’s level. The managements of the Big Four realise this, and have won approval from their boards to raise over $40 billion in fresh capital over the next two years. But Andrew Sheng of the Fung Global Institute, a think-tank, reckons the sector will need to raise even more later: up to $300 billion over the next five years.

http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21584331-four-worlds-biggest-lenders-must-face-some-nasty-truths-giant-reality-check

— China’s bad debts could blow a $500 billion hole in bank balance sheets. That’s roughly how much extra equity the eleven biggest lenders might need if 10 percent of their loans went sour, according to a Breakingviews calculator.

http://blogs.reuters.com/breakingviews/2013/09/04/chinas-bad-debt-could-leave-500-bln-equity-hole/

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China Black Swan risks quantified

In Banks, China on 14/09/2010 at 5:27 am

Morgan Stanley’s Qing Wang created a new tracking concept, the China Macro Risk Radar (CMRR). The  goal is to provide a framework to asses and monitor risk events of low to moderate probability (high probability events already have their own standing at the firm and are singled out in client calls) and high impact.

As part of its inaugural edition, MS has assigned 10 risk events to four different categories on the CMRR – each risk event is assessed according to six aspects, including its description, content, potential impact, likelihood, timeframe, and evolving direction. The top 10 event  that shld concern investors  can be summarized along the following four verticals:

Risk Category A: Macroeconomic

Risk Event 1: Massive NPLs

Risk Event 2: Local Governments Default

Risk Event 3: Economic Hard Landing

Risk Category B: Policy and Regulatory Changes

Risk Event 4: Rapid Wage Increase

Risk Event 5: Introduction of Property Tax

Risk Event 6: Resource Tax Reform

Risk Category C: Financial Market Shocks

Risk Event 7: Property Bubble Burst

Risk Event 8: Commodity Prices Spike

Risk Category D: External Shocks

Risk Event 9: European Sovereign Debt Crisis Redux

Risk Event 10: Trade Protectionism

A visual summary

China: Rerun of US Sub Prime? Part II

In Banks, China on 13/08/2010 at 5:25 am

Chinese banks have been ordered to account for around Rmb2,300bn ($340bn) in off-balance sheet loans in a move that could put some lenders under serious stress and require another large round of capital-raising, reports FT.

Lenders must put all loans sold or transferred to lightly regulated Chinese trust companies back on their books by the end of 2011. And must stop using “informal securitisation” to evade regulatory requirements.

Trying to ensure that banks don’t do what Citi, Merrill Lynch and other US banks were doing? Concealing their leverage albeit legally.

Reminder: Other big problematic numbers are loans to local governments, more than US$230bn of which are considered to be at serious risk of default, and real estate exposure, which accounts for roughly one-tenth of the big banks’ corporate loan books. FT

We live in interesting times.