Posts Tagged ‘Credit Suisse’

HoHoHo, StanChart got wrong CEO?

In Banks, Emerging markets, Temasek on 24/07/2015 at 1:04 pm

But first, shumething from the respected Terry Xu of TOC

Standard Chartered Shakes Up Management Structure The British bank will be organized around three business lines, and top managers will report directly to the new chief executive, William T. Winters.

Did the recruiters at Standard Chartered and Credit Suisse get their dossiers mixed up?

Bill Winters is beginning his tenure as the new boss of the London-based emerging market lender at around the same time that Tidjane Thiam takes charge of the Swiss bank. Both are capable financial executives, but their experiences seem uncannily to better suit the other’s job. That they’ve wound up where they did, rather than where their resumes would suggest they should have, may say more about where the institutions they lead are headed.

Winters, who on July 19 reshaped StanChart’s management structure so that the heads of its major business units now report to him directly rather than to deputy Mike Rees, made his career leading JPMorgan’s investment bank in London … This would appear to eminently qualify him to run Credit Suisse. Its investment bank – stronger in the United States than elsewhere – competes directly with JPMorgan. And its private bank needs to more aggressively poach the very rich folks that Renshaw Bay, the firm he founded, calls customers.

Instead, $48 billion Credit Suisse got an insurance executive, French-educated Ivorian Thiam. True, he showed an affinity for deals as chief executive of Prudential, the UK insurer: an aborted attempt to snatch American International Group’s Asian operations was particularly bold. Private banking arguably should be run more like insurance than investment banking or trading.

Similar thinking prevailed when Barclays named a retail banker to the helm three years ago. But the British lender let Antony Jenkins go on July 8 partly because it needs someone capable of making an investment bank hum.

Though Credit Suisse may not be pre-eminent in Asia, Thiam’s experience there could help rectify that. Of course, that’s the region where $39 billion StanChart is strongest. And Africa, where Thiam was born, is one of StanChart’s prime growth areas. By contrast, Winters’ orientation has been to developed markets – places his bank shows zero interest in pursuing.

Public service indeed

In Banks, Insurance on 01/04/2015 at 2:20 pm

No not LKY but Tidjane Thiam who FT reports got a 36% pay rise to £11.8m in his previous job at Prudential.

Thiam was born in Ivory Coast in 1962. His mother was the niece of Ivory Coast’s first president, while his uncle on his father side is Habib Thiam, who was president of Senegal for 10 years.

Thiam himself worked in the Ivorian government from 1994 to 1999, working as the head of the National Bureau of the Technical Studies and Development and a personal economic adviser to Ivorian president Henri Bédié.

When he became minister he was not paid for six months (as was everyone else in the ministry: there was a financial crisis) and a military coup meant he wasn’t paid. He ended up in prison for a few months He left his country with nothing except his brains and a good name: for example the World Economic Forum named him one of the 100 Global Leaders for Tomorrow.

More on him from sometime back

RISK EXPERT TO LEAD CREDIT SUISSE Shareholders responded positively on Tuesday after Credit Suisse announced that Tidjane Thiam, the chief executive of the British insurer Prudential, would succeed Brady W. Dougan as chief executive, Jenny Anderson reports in DealBook. Shares of Prudential slumped 2.6 percent, while shares of Credit Suisse closed up 6.7 percent. The positive reaction reflects the rise of Mr. Thiam’s reputation in London financial circles and expectations that he will change the course of the Swiss bank, which in recent years has had large legal expenses, largely as a result of its role in helping Americans evade taxes.

Mr. Thiam, an African francophone, has never worked for an investment bank, though he has completed stints at McKinsey, the World Bank and two insurance companies since 2009. And while it remains to be seen whether someone with virtually no banking experience can turn around one of the world’s biggest banks, the need for a leader with Mr. Thiam’s skills and knowledge “speaks volumes about the state of global banking today,” Ms. Anderson writes. “More and more, regulation is pushing banking to be more like insurance: cautious and focused on costs and the allocation of capital.”

In interviews on Tuesday, Mr. Thiam played down his lack of experiencein investment banking. “If you talk about investment banking, Prudential has an $800 billion balance sheet, and we deal with exactly the same issues, whether it’s interest rates or markets,” he was quoted as saying on Bloomberg Television. “There is a lot of overlap.” Still, his lack of ties to the investment bank could mean he will be able to make cuts that Mr. Dougan may have been reluctant to make, Ms. Anderson writes. The change at Credit Suisse will be effective in June.

NYT Dealbook

Third time lucky, Temasek?

In Banks, Temasek on 22/07/2012 at 5:10 am

But if investment is another Merrill Lynch or Barclays or like GIC’s UBS nightmare, amount lost will be “peanuts”. Still.

Credit Suisse initiated a series of measures on July 18 to boost its capital position, including a 3.8 billion Swiss franc issue of mandatory convertible securities to new and existing investors.

The securities will pay an annual coupon of 4% until they convert into 234 million ordinary shares in March 2013. Half the issue will be taken up by strategic investors including Qatar Holding, Saudi Arabia’s Olayan Group, BlackRock Investment, Capital Research Global Investors, Norway’s Norges Bank and Temasek. Some of the strategic investors have also underwritten the other half of the issue, which will be offered to existing Credit Suisse shareholders.

Related posts

Estimate of Temasek’s losses on ML and Barclays

Estimate of GIC’s loss on UBS:

Money for jam

In Uncategorized on 31/10/2011 at 6:10 am

I’m a shareholder in Lippo Malls Indonesia Retail Trust that has called for a massive rights issue (S$336.8m) that will not be underwritten by the five Joint Mgrs (StanChart, CIMB, Credit Suisse, BoA and UBS). Market is too volatile for them to risk their money for “peanuts”? In normal markets, they would be entitled to a fee of 2- 3% for underwriting the rights issue. This would have worked out to fees of between S$6.7m- S$10.1m.

But the five of them (StanChart, CIMB, Credit Suisse, BoA and UBS) are getting a total of S$1.5m (or 0.45% of amt to be raised) to do bugger all as I see it. This is 31.25% of the fees that will paid in relation to the rights issue. The rest of the fees will go to StanChart (financial adviser), lawyers, accountants, printers and so on.

Guess LMIR didn’t want to upset the investment banks who were planning to underwrite the issue.


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 259 other followers