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Posts Tagged ‘high-yield’

Reits and other high yielders fit narrative for the “New Neutral”

In Financial competency, Property, Reits on 17/11/2014 at 1:58 pm

BOND KING’S MANTRA LIVES ON William H. Gross may have departed Pimco, but executives at the bond giant have embraced his view that a stagnating global economy will force central banks to keep interest rates low, Landon Thomas Jr. writes in DealBook. …

Before he left the firm, Mr. Gross called his insight the “new neutral,” and Pimco is showing no signs of abandoning its departed leader’s mantra. In so doing, the firm’s executives are making the case that the Pimco bond funds that have made investments based on this economic approach will not soon change their strategy. Daniel Ivascyn, who was appointed to succeed Mr. Gross as group chief investment officer, took pains to point out that this new investment tack had many fathers, and emerged from a Pimco-wide brainstorming session this spring. But it is also true that the notion never really took off until Mr. Gross pitched it at an investor conference while wearing sunglasses, Mr. Thomas writes.

Mr. Gross’s economic predictions have failed in the past, but Pimco looks to be on firmer ground this time around. Like Mr. Gross, a number of economists believe that a mix of high debt, low growth and disinflation will force central banks around the world to keep rates from rising. Before he left Pimco, Mr. Gross had begun to invest in riskier, higher-yielding securities like government bonds in Italy and Spain and corporate bonds in Brazil, a strategy that the firm is still following. …

NYT’s Dealbook

Well the equivalent of these in equities would be Reits and other high yielders. Interestingly, FT reports that the fund mgr of Schroders flagship UK fund thinks there is value in income producing equities.

And an alternative view: We are doomed, doomed. Central banks cannot prevent deflation of everything including assets.

 http://blogs.reuters.com/breakingviews/2014/10/06/asset-price-disinflation-may-be-next-big-thing/

High-yield, low pay-out stocks are best

In Uncategorized on 10/11/2010 at 5:40 am

[Update– read the first comment. Credit Suisse could be wrong]

In Singapore, investing in high-yield, low-payout stocks was the best-performing strategy over a period of 15 years says Credit Suisse. “Outperformers” are telco M1; rig builders Keppel Corp and Sembcorp Marine; transport group ComfortDelGro Corp; property developer Allgreen Properties; and conglomerate Sembcorp Industries.

These stocks have dividend yields of up to 6.3% (as of end October) a year and only pay out as little as one-third of their profits as dividends.

Other high-yield, low-payout stocks it mentions are Fortune Reit; and property companies MCL Land and United Engineers. These have dividend yields of over 3% a year but pay out less than a quarter of their earnings as dividends.

Why?

— “High-yield, low-payout essentially means you are buying yield stocks that are trading at a low price-earnings ratio’, or value stocks”. This¬†strategy tends to outperform others in rising markets except in the bubble phase.

— A “low payout implies that these companies are retaining cash for growth which also helps long-term performance”. I never tot of this. Silly me.

— If things go wrong, the dividend yields could be sustained if part of the retained earnings were put into reserves (bit like S’pore’s reserves). This is my tot, not Credit Suisse’s.

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