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Posts Tagged ‘Seelan Palay’

Why Seelan Palay and Jolovan Wham like being jailed

In Uncategorized on 15/05/2019 at 11:25 am

Seelan Palay and Jolovan Wham have gone to prison rather than pay fines.

Maybe they tot that going to prison is a ‘Moving and maturing experience’?

The prison guide [of the Extinction Rebellion: my note] advised people to take books with “plenty of good tips for yoga and meditation” and to “structure the space with time for sitting, yoga, breathing exercises, journalising, creative art”.

It continued: “If you get solitary [confinement], there’s plenty of time for meditation. Lastly you can take as many naps as you want!”

https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-48147915

And I’m sure Willy Sum agrees with them.

As does Terry Xu: he says he’s mentally prepared to go to prison for his views and actions. It’ll do him a lot of good, because he’ll lose a lot of weight.

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PAP govt one up up on repressive central Asian republic?

In Political governance, Public Administration on 13/05/2019 at 10:55 am

In S’pore, a few years ago, a person was arrested for holding a mirror. So did someone from Kazakhstan study our laws and decide to imitate us?

The Kazakh police took a young activist into custody after he decided to test whether he could get away with standing in the street holding a placard with no writing on it.

Aslan Sagutdinov took the placard to the central Abay Square of his native city of Oral in the west of the country, and held it up opposite the central council offices.

The video blogger took the precaution of having a colleague capture the whole thing on film, which the local Uralskaya Nedelya news site embedded in its report.

“I’m not taking part in a protest, and I want to show that they’ll still take me down the police station, even though there’s nothing written on my placard and I’m not shouting any slogans,” the 24-year-old told reporters who’d turned up to see what happened.

https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-news-from-elsewhere-48187353

Here is what I wrote in 2017 about the guy carrying a mirror who was arrested.

Seelan Palay: Sylvia Lim was right

Here I made fun of Seelan Palay’s latest attempt to test the OB markers: he crossed a red line after the police tried very hard not to arrest him, but he persisted, “After several failed attempts by the Police to persuade Seelan to leave the area, he was arrested by the Police at 3.20pm.” (TOC report)

Two years ago I wrote about how one person can be arrested for an illegal assembly

Jogging alone can be illegal?

If wearing the wrong tee-shirt or singlet?

Try walkng or jogging alone* wearing a “Free our CPF” singlet: remember that any public assembly of more than one person** needs police permission.

And jogging in a group of two or more”Free our CPF” singlets will be like jogging in groups in Burundi: illegal.

Running is a national pastime in Burundi, with hundreds of people out jogging on weekend mornings. But in March [2014] the authorities banned jogging in groups – unless permission was sought from the authorities. It affects all group sports in the capital, which can now only be played in designated areas.

Jogging by Lake Tanganyika

The restrictions followed the arrest of some opposition members who were out jogging and chanting political slangs. Police officers tried to stop what they regarded as an illegal march and the situation deteriorated into clashes. More than 40 Movement for Solidarity and Democracy (MSD) party members received sentences ranging from five years to life.

Burundi: Where jogging is a crime

Wonder what about wearing a tee shirt with a Oppo party logo, drinking teh tarik as social media celebrities Ravi and Jeannette Chong used to do when they were NSP tua kees.

And what about the crowds assembling to pay their respects to LKY? What about the crowds at the National Museum LKY exhibition?

Seems anything the PAP administration or the SPF doesn’t like can be an illegal assembly.

Related post: PAP uses Lawfare against its opponents?

———‘

*Auntie Sylvia was absolutely right in 2007 and 2009 when she spoke out publicly:

The change in definition of “assembly” and “procession” is more disturbing. As the Explanatory Statement to the Bill says, these words are no longer restricted to gatherings of 5 persons or more. This means even ONE person alone can constitute illegal assembly, thus giving the State complete control over an individual citizen’s freedoms.

‘First, to say that 1 person constitutes an assembly is certainly an abuse of the word. Secondly, is the government making the change because there had been incidents involving less than 5 persons which had disrupted public life? Unless there is compelling evidence to prove to us that expanding the definition of assembly and procession is needed, this expansion does not deserve our support,”  Sylvia Lim in parly in 2009.

Earlier, in 2007, she had said:

“This refers to clauses 29 and 30 of the Bill. By clause 29 of the Bill, we are removing the heading “Offences Against Public Tranquility” and replacing it with “Offences relating to Unlawful Assembly”. By Clause 30, we will be deleting “mischief or trespass or other offence” and replacing it with “to commit any offence”.

S 141 has been amended to bring it in line with a recent Court of Appeal case: PP v Tan Meng Khin [1995] 2 SLR 505. Now, an assembly will be unlawful if people intend to commit an offence punishable with imprisonment of 6 mths or more, even if it is peaceful and does not disturb public tranquillity. Under our law, a person who organizes a procession or assembly after the police rejection of a permit can be punished with max 6 months jail under the Miscellaneous Offences Act. Hence 5 or more people who gather to do so will become members of an unlawful assembly.

As our society continues to evolve, the time is surely ripe for us to allow peaceful outdoor protests as a form of expression. By all means, we can have rules about how, where and when such processions may be held, but wider law reform is needed. S 141 should be restricted to offences which threaten the public peace, and other laws such as the Miscellaneous Offences Act which require permits for peaceful assemblies should be modified.”

**Two men between the ages of 24 and 25 were arrested by police outside the Istana on Saturday afternoon (Apr 4).

Police said the duo had turned up in front of the Istana with placards at about 4pm. Channel NewsAsia understands that the men were holding signs that read “You can’t silence the people” and “Injustice” for about half an hour. They were clad in identical red hoodies and dark blue jeans.

Police also said both of them had refused to stop the activity despite requests from officers. As such, they were arrested for organising a public assembly without a permit, under Section 16(1)(a) of the Public Order Act, Chapter 257A.

Seelan Palay: Sylvia Lim was right

And there’s this more recent event: Jolovan’s latest problem shows Sylvia Lim’s and my prescience

Cluelessness of ang moh tua kees

In Uncategorized on 13/12/2017 at 4:13 pm

Below is a long rant from a bunch of ang moh tua kees. They quote Cesar A. Cruz (a professional Harvard trouble maker), “Art should comfort the disturbed and disturb the comfortable”.

Well in S’pore as in many parts of the West, the attitude of the public, as distinct from the chattering classes that the ang moh tua kees mindlessly ape, seems to be “Art should comfort the comfortable and ignore the disturbed”. A view incidentally I agree with.

My take on Seelan Palsy’s arrest: Seelan Palay is really very happy to be arrested a second time. He’s been trying for years. But the anti-PAP mob must mindlessly KPKB even when police do one of them a big favour.

SHRINKING SPACE FOR ARTISTIC AND CIVIC EXPRESSION IN SINGAPORE
– STATEMENT ON THE ARREST OF ARTIST, SEELAN PALAY

On 1 Oct 2017, Sunday, Artist Seelan Palay was arrested outside Parliament House, halfway through his performance about how a free mind cannot be constrained by space. The piece had begun at Hong Lim Park in the rain, and then had continued at City Hall (now the National Gallery of Singapore) and thereafter Parliament House. At Parliament House, he was first approached and questioned by a number of police officers, and then was subsequently arrested. As such, he was unable to continue the rest of the performance. He has since been released on police bail, but is subjected to severe restrictions, including restrictions on travels.

In response to his arrest, Function 8 and Community Action Network (CAN) released a statement on 4 Oct 2017, Wednesday. In their statement, they highlighted concerns about Seelan’s arrest, as well as called for the release of Seelan from all restrictions as well as the ceasing of harassment and intimidation of activists, and Arts Engage would like to echo these sentiments.

Seelan’s arrest is troubling as an extreme example of police action, yet not entirely surprising given Singapore’s long and enduring history of warnings and censorship of artists and artworks by the government. For example, just earlier this year, two works under the M1 Fringe Festival were denied ratings by the Infocomm Media Development Authority (IMDA) – effectively preventing them from being watched as they were originally conceived by the artists (for the Arts Engage statement on this, please refer to: https://sites.google.com/…/artse…/censorship—rating-denied).

However, when these actions against artists are viewed in context of society as a whole, there appears a dangerous trend of shrinking space for artistic and civil expression in Singapore:
– Earlier this year, on 3 June 2017, Saturday, there was a brief silent demonstration on the MRT along the North-South line. Specifically, a number of activists held up the book ‘1987 Singapore’s Marxist Conspiracy, 30 Years On’ while wearing blindfolds. Media reported the demonstration as a protest against the 1987 detentions under the Internal Security Act, and shortly after, it was also reported that a police investigation was launched. However, no clear details were released to the public.
– In yet another instance, licensed busker Roy Payamal was handcuffed and arrested in front of Takashimaya on 11 March 2017, Saturday, for apparently speaking to the police in a loud voice while they were checking his busking license. Roy later clarified there was a misunderstanding, but to date he is still on bail as opposed to being a free citizen.

Clearly, there seems to be a signal to society at large that there is no space for any challenge to authority, regardless of an openness to engage or being of a peaceable nature. Arts Engage is thus concerned that this will result in greater reluctance amongst Singaporeans to speak out in the face of injustice or even just to stand up for their own rights. In the long term, this will negatively impact the growth and maturity of civic discourse in Singapore.

As such, we would like to urge the police and the government to keep an open attitude towards artists and citizens. As Cesar A. Cruz famously said, “Art should comfort the disturbed and disturb the comfortable”. The actions of activists and artists may cause discomfort for some in the society, but equally, there will be others who are comforted by it. In order for society to grow and mature, we all need to learn to be able to engage with issues and people we disagree with, not merely have authorities step in to ‘solve’ the problem by way of criminal persecution or censorship. As a move towards building a society that is respectful of diversity and dissent, Arts Engage would like to call on the government to lead by example, to take time and effort at the very least to engage with artists, activists, and public alike.

In an increasingly divided world, it is important to commit to having authentic conversations at both ground level and at policy level, so as to practice the inclusion of pluralistic points of view and ways of living. In doing so, the terms and platforms of engagement should not always be determined by the government. We must welcome the diverse and creative actions initiated by citizens as well, and honour their fundamental right to the freedom of expression. Not everyone has access to the same platforms to air their concerns, opinions and aspirations, and a healthy society should encourage the various ways that people choose to make their voice heard. Ultimately, embracing different articulations – whether artistic or not, whether political or not – of citizen’s sentiments is crucial to a functional democracy.

Arts Engage

Seelan Palay: Sylvia Lim was right

In Political governance, Public Administration on 08/10/2017 at 1:46 pm

Here I made fun of Seelan Palay’s latest attempt to test the OB markers: he crossed a red line after the police tried very hard not to arrest him, but he persisted, “After several failed attempts by the Police to persuade Seelan to leave the area, he was arrested by the Police at 3.20pm.” (TOC report)

Two years ago I wrote about how one person can be arrested for an illegal assembly

Jogging alone can be illegal?

If wearing the wrong tee-shirt or singlet?

Try walkng or jogging alone* wearing a “Free our CPF” singlet: remember that any public assembly of more than one person** needs police permission.

And jogging in a group of two or more”Free our CPF” singlets will be like jogging in groups in Burundi: illegal.

Running is a national pastime in Burundi, with hundreds of people out jogging on weekend mornings. But in March [2014] the authorities banned jogging in groups – unless permission was sought from the authorities. It affects all group sports in the capital, which can now only be played in designated areas.

Jogging by Lake Tanganyika

The restrictions followed the arrest of some opposition members who were out jogging and chanting political slangs. Police officers tried to stop what they regarded as an illegal march and the situation deteriorated into clashes. More than 40 Movement for Solidarity and Democracy (MSD) party members received sentences ranging from five years to life.

Burundi: Where jogging is a crime

Wonder what about wearing a tee shirt with a Oppo party logo, drinking teh tarik as social media celebrities Ravi and Jeannette Chong used to do when they were NSP tua kees.

And what about the crowds assembling to pay their respects to LKY? What about the crowds at the National Museum LKY exhibition?

Seems anything the PAP administration or the SPF doesn’t like can be an illegal assembly.

Related post: PAP uses Lawfare against its opponents?

———‘

*Auntie Sylvia was absolutely right in 2007 and 2009 when she spoke out publicly:

The change in definition of “assembly” and “procession” is more disturbing. As the Explanatory Statement to the Bill says, these words are no longer restricted to gatherings of 5 persons or more. This means even ONE person alone can constitute illegal assembly, thus giving the State complete control over an individual citizen’s freedoms.

‘First, to say that 1 person constitutes an assembly is certainly an abuse of the word. Secondly, is the government making the change because there had been incidents involving less than 5 persons which had disrupted public life? Unless there is compelling evidence to prove to us that expanding the definition of assembly and procession is needed, this expansion does not deserve our support,”  Sylvia Lim in parly in 2009.

Earlier, in 2007, she had said:

“This refers to clauses 29 and 30 of the Bill. By clause 29 of the Bill, we are removing the heading “Offences Against Public Tranquility” and replacing it with “Offences relating to Unlawful Assembly”. By Clause 30, we will be deleting “mischief or trespass or other offence” and replacing it with “to commit any offence”.

S 141 has been amended to bring it in line with a recent Court of Appeal case: PP v Tan Meng Khin [1995] 2 SLR 505. Now, an assembly will be unlawful if people intend to commit an offence punishable with imprisonment of 6 mths or more, even if it is peaceful and does not disturb public tranquillity. Under our law, a person who organizes a procession or assembly after the police rejection of a permit can be punished with max 6 months jail under the Miscellaneous Offences Act. Hence 5 or more people who gather to do so will become members of an unlawful assembly.

As our society continues to evolve, the time is surely ripe for us to allow peaceful outdoor protests as a form of expression. By all means, we can have rules about how, where and when such processions may be held, but wider law reform is needed. S 141 should be restricted to offences which threaten the public peace, and other laws such as the Miscellaneous Offences Act which require permits for peaceful assemblies should be modified.”

**Two men between the ages of 24 and 25 were arrested by police outside the Istana on Saturday afternoon (Apr 4).

Police said the duo had turned up in front of the Istana with placards at about 4pm. Channel NewsAsia understands that the men were holding signs that read “You can’t silence the people” and “Injustice” for about half an hour. They were clad in identical red hoodies and dark blue jeans.

Police also said both of them had refused to stop the activity despite requests from officers. As such, they were arrested for organising a public assembly without a permit, under Section 16(1)(a) of the Public Order Act, Chapter 257A.

 

 

Seelan Palay is really very happy

In Uncategorized on 07/10/2017 at 1:34 pm

Don’t buy the BS that he’s been persecuted for protesting.

Don’t believe me isit? Then read the u/m by Martyn See (another anti-PAP activist).

When I read it, I realised how hard Seelan Palay was trying to getting himself arrested for a second time since his first arrest in 2006. It took him 11 years of provoking the authorities before the police arrested him again recently.

And even then, the police arrested him after really, really trying hard not to arrest him. TOC (no friend of the authorities especially the police) reported, “After several failed attempts by the Police to persuade Seelan to leave the area, he was arrested by the Police at 3.20pm.”

So let’s be happy that he was successful in getting himself arrested again after 11 years.

Martyn See’s post

Sept 2006 (IMF-World Bank Meetings): 21-year-old artist Seelan Palay is arrested by police over a plan to distribute flyers ahead of the IMF-World Bank meetings. Palay had earlier initiated an online campaign to capture photos of “400 Frowns” in protest against government policies.

Jan 2008: Artist Seelan Palay completes a solo five-day hunger strike outside the Malaysian High Commission in protest against the Malaysian Government’s detention of five leaders of ethnic Indian group Hindraf. Wearing a placard around his neck that said, “Give them fair trial,” Palay was briefly warned by police that he would be flouting the law. No arrest or charges are filed.

May 2008: Five Singaporeans, holding aloft a series of banners with messages such as “Censored News Is No News” and “Newspapers and Printing Presses Act = Repression”, stand outside the Singapore Press Holdings building to mark World Press Freedom Day. There are no reported arrests.

May 2008: Officers from the Board of Film Censors, assisted by the police, enter the Peninsula-Excelsior Hotel to seize a film which was undergoing its private premiere. Witnessed by about a hundred guests including foreign diplomats, organisers hand the DVD copy of the film to officials. Entitled “One Nation Under Lee”, the documentary was made by artist Seelan Palay and its premiere hosted by the SDP. Palay is currently under investigation for exhibition of a film without licence.

Jan 2009: Wearing red t-shirts and holding a banner that read ‘Stop ill-treatment of Burmese activists’, two protesters stood for an hour outside the Ministry of Manpower before being handcuffed and escorted into police vehicles. The two were protesting against the non-renewal of visas to some Myanmar expatriates, whom the Government says are “not welcomed in Singapore”. The two Singaporeans, Seelan Palay and Chong Kai Xiong, are being investigated for the offence of criminal trespass.

Oct 2017 : Artist and activist Seelan Palay marks his 32 years of age by holding a mirror in front of Parliament House to highlight the long-term detention of Dr Chia Thye Poh from 1966 to 1998. He is arrested and released 24 hours later.

http://singaporerebel.blogspot.sg/…/1994-2011-chronology-of…

Video:

“We are still colonised in Singapore, previously by white man, and now by men in white.”

https://m.facebook.com/story.php…