atans1

Posts Tagged ‘Uber’

Allah also against Uber?/ Our “religion”

In Indonesia on 24/04/2018 at 6:06 am

In Indonesia Uber “has been outmanoeuvred by Go-Jek’s Go-Car, launched in 2016” says the FT.  It’s also ahead of Grab, co-founded by a cross-wearing M’sian Christian, now living in S’pore: Real reason why Uber lost to Grab.

Indonesia is impt because it’s 2/3 of the regional market according to the FT. But can Allah help out in other SE Asian countries?

Excluding Vietnam (Jesus and Buddha), M’sia (Allah got competition with Jesus, Buddha, Guan Ying, our Harry and the Hindoo gods), the Philippines (Jesus and Durterte), Singapore (Hard Truths) and Thailand (Buddha) have varying prohibitions on motorbike ride-hailing, Go-Jerk’s strength (Allah likes motorbikes?), FT points out.

 

Advertisements

Real reason why Uber lost to Grab

In Uncategorized on 09/04/2018 at 11:18 am

God was on the side of the cross-wearing, humble Grab co-founder.

The first thing you notice about Anthony Tan is that he wears a big silver cross around his neck …

He credits his strong belief system for much of his success, and even in his language, the word “serve” comes up numerous times.

“If there’s any one thing I would love that people remembered me for would be hey, Anthony… was a true servant leader,” he told me in his offices in downtown Singapore.

http://www.bbc.com/news/business-43667202

God actually didn’t have much of a choice in deciding to help Grab. After all, on the other side was Uber, a  company that seemed to want parody and mock Google’s “Do no evil” moto by deliberately “Doing evil”.

It

— employed a felon to monitor a driverless car that killed a pedestrian,

— used illegal software to secretly “fix” its competitors, regulators and its drivers,

— used thuggish tactics to intidimate its competitors, regulators and its drivers,

— illegally obtained the medsical reports of a lady who alleged a Uber driver raped here with the intention of using the info to discredit her,

— tried to outspend its rivals hoping to bankrupt them (Didn’t work in US of A, and it lost in Russia, China and SE Asia, and

— treated female staff as playthings.

Meanwhile Grab’s co-founder prayed to God.

More dirt on Uber’s driverless cars/ “Do no evil” is better option?

In Uncategorized on 30/03/2018 at 4:23 am
From NYT Dealbook

Uber said it would not renew its California permit for self-driving vehicle tests until investigations were complete in Arizona. And it’s facing questions over a decision to scale back on safety sensors.

Critic’s corner: Timothy B. Lee argues in Ars Technica that Uber should sell its self-driving project, which needed a firm with a “methodical, safety-oriented culture.”

But Waymo (related to Google) still intends to put thousands of self-driving cars — customized Jaguar I-Paces, to be precise — on the road over the next two years.

 

More on why only a Uber car killed a pedestrian

In Uncategorized on 29/03/2018 at 4:39 am

The Economist reported that the car was doing 0ver 60 mph in in 45 mph zone. Where was the criminal driver? He really is a criminal: Why only a Uber car killed a pedestrian.

NYT Dealbook further reported

Even before a pedestrian was killed in Tempe, Ariz., Uber was struggling with its autonomous vehicle efforts, needing human intervention nearly every 13 miles on average in Arizona tests. Those technical issues made being an operator of Uber’s cars very stressful.

So they employed a criminal? Why only a Uber car killed a pedestrian.

BBC reported

Uber has been forbidden from resuming self-driving tests in the US state of Arizona.

The car-hailing company had already halted its trial after one of the vehicles involved struck and killed a pedestrian a week ago.

The state’s governor wrote to the firm on Monday saying there had been an “unquestionable failure” to make safety the top priority.

Uber: Lost Chiina war, spinning its way to victory

In China on 03/08/2016 at 3:42 pm

The battle for ride-sharing in China is over. Didi Chuxing plans to buy Uber China. After spending tens of millions of dollars every month fighting for market share, the two companies will combine into a new one worth about $35 billion.

“I’ve learned that being successful is about listening to your head as well as following your heart,” Travis Kalanick, Uber’s chief executive blogged, adding “Uber and Didi Chuxing are investing billions of dollars in China and both have yet to turn a profit there.”

Bloomberg, said that Uber had lost more than $2 billion in China.

Investors in Uber China will receive a 20% stake in the new company and Didi will make a US$1 billion investment in Uber Global.

After the deal Uber passengers were going on Weibo, China’s version of Twitter, to complain that the cost of regular routes previously taken had risen steeply. One said it had doubled as Uber discontinued its subsidies. FT had earlier this week reported that Didi had in the last month quietly raised fares.

The Uber victory spin is as follows:

[O]ne of Uber’s biggest investors and strategic advisers, Bradley Tusk, the chief executive of Tusk Ventures ,,,

 

Mr Tusk insists though that Uber got the best out of a bad situation. The American ride-hailing app was losing a billion dollars a year in China, and this new deal sees Uber owning a 20% stake in the merged company.

“Uber invested $2bn in China, and ended up with a $7bn stake in Didi,” says Mr Tusk. “That’s not a bad deal if you look at it like that.”

BBC

But is the valuation of Didi real? @0% of zero is zero.

But Americans are the master of BS.

Uber raises money to subsidide users

In China, Financial competency, India on 15/07/2016 at 1:28 pm

NYT Dealbook explains Uber’s biz model of sunsidising the rides of Chinese and Indian customers to starve its competitors of biz:

WHY UBER KEEPS RAISING MILLIONS It feels like almost every other week there is a new headline about Uber raising more money, Andrew Ross Sorkin writes in the DealBook column.

If you add up all the money the company has raised since it started in 2009,it is on its way to amassing $15 billion and has a valuation of $68 billion – all while remaining a private company.

When Amazon went public in 1997, it had raised $54 million and was valued at $438 million.

Uber has to finance its efforts to grab market share in China and India, butit is also trying to mark its territory. Every time Uber raises another $1 billion, investors find it less attractive to back one of Uber’s rivals: Didi Chuxing, Lyft, Gett, Halo, Juno. It is a war of attrition, to starve the competition of cash.

Uber’s efforts seem to have had the opposite effect so far, spawning a long list of rivals, but as the smaller competitors run out of cash, venture capitalists should be less inclined to put up more money.

This arms race comes against the backdrop of falling valuations and there is a rush to take the money while it is still available. Bill Gurley, a venture capitalist who has a stake in Uber and sits on its board, warned investors about unicorns seeking funds: “You are not being invited to a special dance, you are being approached because you are the lender of last resort.”

The question is whether investors will look at Uber’s balance sheet and throw up the white flag. It still has formidable competition from Didi, the market leader in China, which just raised $7 billion. And some of the same investors that have backed Uber are also backing Didi, including BlackRock and Tiger Global. (Some may be hoping that Uber might one day merge its Chinese operation with Didi.)

Uber’s most recent fund-raising effort – focused on the leveraged loan market – aims to avoid diluting the current base of shareholders and having to sell itself at an even higher valuation. It will have to pay up for the financing, but if its valuation continues to grow, it would be a bargain compared with the value of the equity. Uber is hoping to sell debt with a yield of 4 or 4.5 percent.

The question between now and the probable initial public offering in a few years is whether it will have starved all of its competitors along the way.