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Archive for the ‘China’ Category

Wuhan virus: Jialat, if this true

In China on 28/02/2020 at 4:00 am

The first case could have on 1 December, not 31 December 2019.

The official Chinese narrative is that the first coronavirus case was on 31 December last yr and many of the first cases of the pneumonia-like infection were immediately connected to a seafood and animal market in Wuhan, in the Hubei province.

But this narrative could be wrong by 30 days. The first case could have occurred on 1 December:

[A} study, by Chinese researchers published in the Lancet medical journal, claimed the first person to be diagnosed with Covid-19, was on 1 December 2019 (a lot of earlier) and that person had “no contact” with the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market.

Wu Wenjuan, a senior doctor at Wuhan’s Jinyintan Hospital and one of the authors of the study, told the BBC Chinese Service that the patient was an elderly man who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease.

“He (the patient) lived four or five buses from the seafood market, and because he was sick he basically didn’t go out,” Wu Wenjuan said.

She also said that three other people developed symptoms in the following days – two of whom had no exposure to Huanan either.

However, the researchers also found that 27 people of a sample of 41 patients admitted to hospital in the early stages of the outbreak “had been exposed to the market”.

The hypothesis that the outbreak started at the market and could have been transmitted from a living animal to a human host before spreading human-to-human is still considered the most likely, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200221-coronavirus-the-harmful-hunt-for-covid-19s-patient-zero

 

Why Trump loves the Wuhan virus

In China on 27/02/2020 at 4:07 pm

Google, Microsoft shift production from China faster due to virus

Nikkei Asian Review headline

The Nikkei Asian Review reports that the worsening coronavirus outbreak has Google and Microsoft accelerating their shifts in production of new phones, personal computers and other devices from China to Southeast Asia. Factories in Vietnam and Thailand are expected to be the biggest beneficiaries.

Apple is also doing the same.

While Trump would prefer them to move manufacturing back to the US of A, he’d settle for them leaving China.

All in all, the Wuhan is hastening not only US-China conspicuous decoupling, but also China’s links with other developed countries.

Wuhan virus: Goldman Sachs has second tots?

In China, Financial competency on 22/02/2020 at 4:14 am

Just as well as Wall ST is down two days in a row on fears that that the Wuhan Virus is an economic killer. Apple’s profits warning early this week spooked the market. When Apple sneezes, investors worry.

Before Apple’s warning, in Wuhan virus: Why investors are not panicking, I had quoted Goldman Sachs

We estimate that even in a scenario where the rate of new infections did not peak until the second quarter, the negative hit to global economic growth would be about 0.3 percentage points. That means the expansion would still be 3.1 per cent — in line with last year’s pace.

Goldman Sachs Japan vice chair talking about the global economy

This week, “The impact of the coronavirus on earnings may well be underestimated in current stock prices,” Peter Oppenheimer, analyst at Goldman Sachs, warned in a client note this week.

He said that investors are misjudging the full impact of the Covid-19 outbreak on companies’ earnings, pointing to China’s economic rise and greater integration in the world economy. Note (The Chinese economy is six times larger now than it was during the Sars outbreak of 2003, and Chinese tourism alone accounts for about 0.4%) of global GDP.

He said forecasts for profit growth this year are already “relatively modest” and so far earnings revisions have been in line with the historical trends, including in “more cyclical markets like Europe, where direct exposure to China is much higher”.

Equity markets are looking increasingly exposed to near-term downward surprises to earnings growth and while a sustained bear market does not look likely, a near-term correction is looking much more probable.

Remember: A correction is defined as a drop of 10% or more from a recent peak.

 

Where S’pore is not too exposed to China

In China, Economy on 20/02/2020 at 5:42 am

S’pore’s a very open economy. But I was surprised to learn that like M’sia and Vietnam, we are not that dependent on China for electrical and electronic components. China’s the world’s largest exporter.

We are below world’s average. India despite considering China as its geopolitical rival (Chinese think Indians are deluded) are the 5th most dependent country: all those cheap made in India smartphones are assembled from Chinese imports.

Of course this doesn’t mean that places like Vietnam, S’pore and M’sia will not be hurt by China’s slowdown. MNCs from these countries are large exporters of  electrical and electronic components to China.

I’ll try to find a chart showing this.

Why Mamas are running US tech giants, not us slit-eyes

In China, Humour, India, Uncategorized on 19/02/2020 at 3:36 pm

Indian supremacists and their Chinese friends are KPKBing about Indian start-ops depend on Chinese money

They point out that as usual Mamas are punching above their weight (like in S’pore law and politics) in the US C-suites and politically. Hello Andrew Yang juz dropped out of the presidential. The ladies with mama blood were booted out a long time ago.

OK, OK, there are 4 mamas heading US giant techs.

Mr Krishna’s recent elevation at IBM mirrors the rise of Satya Nadella at Microsoft and Shantanu Narayen at Adobe. They were Indian-born engineers who took over at prominent US tech companies that were going through a midlife crisis. Then there is Alphabet’s CEO, Sundar Pichai

Meanwhile,

Chinese engineers complain that Silicon Valley has an ethnic glass ceiling, and interviewees, many of whom are naturalised American citizens, compared their status with the relative success of Indians in large tech companies.

“In the US many Indian managers have become big company’s CEOs, but in many ways there’s still a bottleneck for Chinese people,” said Hans Tung, managing partner of GGV Capital, at a recent conference in Beijing. Turning to Eric Yuan, the founder of Zoom, he asked: “What do you think can be done?”.

Mr Yuan is Silicon Valley’s most well-known Chinese immigrant success story. His video conference app Zoom, which listed last April, is valued at almost $21bn. Mr Yuan responded that many Indian engineers were not only proficient at technical work, but also at understanding business models and management.

“It’s Chinese culture: it emphasises obedience and modesty, not confidence,” says Sophie Xu, a PayPal employee who left China for Canada and then the US 17 years ago. “There’s no wild ambition, we love book smarts.”

FT

My interpretation: Mamas suck up to ang mohs while Chinese ignore ang mohs. The latter believe that their work will show how good they are: they think of Grandpa’s Xi rise in China. Mamas not that naive: they know sucking ass matters.

Indian start-ops depend on Chinese money

In China, India on 19/02/2020 at 4:04 am

India has always tot of China as a geopolitical rival* and is cautious about Chinese investment.

But that caution has not prevented Chinese venture capitalists from providing a record amount of funding for Indian start-ups last year In the final quarter of the year, deals involving Chinese investors totalled a record US$1.4bn, according to figures from Refinitiv. Data provider Tracxn said Chinese funds invested in 54 funding rounds last year — the largest ever number — compared with just three in 2013 and more than double what it was in 2017.

This made China into one of the biggest sources of funds for start-ups in India, joining traditional investors in Indian start-ups like Sequoia and SoftBank. Two-thirds of India’s start-ups valued at more than US$1bn now have at least one Chinese VC investor.

Indian talking heads are fueling concerns about Chinese influence amid unfriendly relations between the two countries.

====================

*Chinese are surprised that India thinks itself as China’s rival. They can’t stop stop laughing at India’s delusions of grandeur.

S$ in intensive care

In China, Currencies, Economy on 15/02/2020 at 4:19 am

The u/m currencies the fragile, vulnerable Wuhan flu currencies.

 

Related posts:

S$ tanks as GDP forecasts slashed

China sneezes, S’pore in intensive care with Thailand, HK, M’sia and Korea dying.

Why has M$ strengthened against S$?

Spare a tot for widow of dead Chinese hero who China POFMaed

In China on 08/02/2020 at 7:22 am

Li Wenliang’s widow is sick.

According to an official Chinese statement, Li Wenliang’s widow Fu Xuejie has a fever, and is five months pregnant with Li’s second child. She worries about who will care for their five-year-old son if her health deteriorates.

China’s version of POFMA gives our POFMa a bad name.

On 30 December 2019, Li Wenliang, informed fellow doctors in an online chat group of seven new pneumonia cases and talked about a SARs like virus. He was reprimanded by Wuhan police, who made him sign a document saying he was “making false comments on the Internet.”. At least seven other medical professionals were similarly warned over “rumour-mongering”.

Effectively the Wuhan authorities forbade doctors from making public announcements and ordered them to report cases internally.

Whatever, the Chinese Sopreme court cleared them of “rumour-mongering.

Another Nazi first — CCTV

In China, Internet on 05/02/2020 at 5:03 am

In Peenemünde,

in October 1942, German engineers sat in a control room watching a television screen. It showed live, close-up images of a prototype weapon on its launch pad some 2.5km (1.5 miles) away. On another screen, with a wide-angle view, they saw the weapon surge skywards.

The test had succeeded. They were looking at something that would shape the future – but perhaps not in the way they imagined.

First time CCTV was used.

The pictures in that control room were the first example of a video feed being used not for broadcasting, but for real-time monitoring, in private – over a so-called “closed circuit”.

Television engineer Walter Bruch devised a way for the senior officers, and scientists to monitor the launches from a safe distance.

And that was wise, because the first V2 they tested did indeed blow up, destroying one of Bruch’s cameras.

Exactly how popular Bruch’s brainchild has now become is tricky to pin down. One estimate, a few years old, puts the number of surveillance cameras around the world at 245 million – that is about one for every 30 people. Another reckons there will soon be over twice that number in China alone.

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-50673770

 

China sneezes, S’pore in intensive care

In China, Economy, Uncategorized on 03/02/2020 at 7:22 am

Koreans will die.

So will the Hongkies, Thais and M’sias. S’poreans, Japanese, Peenoys, Viet Kong, Diggers and Indons will be in the intensive care unit.

 

The only people happy in S’pore are those who wish S’pore ill: Fake news that S’poreans panicking about shortage of masks.

Anti-PAP activists and cybernuts love the opportiunity, or so they think, of spreading more fake news to sabo the PAP govt.

But they are deluded. Tom, I’ll post why the PAP govt will now win bigely this GE. The 4G leaders will get the 65% of the popular vote that they need.

Remember that I was negative about the 4G team getting 65% of the popular vote: Ground is not sweet for an early 2020 GE.

“Bai Du Bu Qin” not “Gong Xi Fa Cai”

In China, Holidays and Festivals on 31/01/2020 at 4:08 am

“Bai Du Bu Qin”, is replacing “Gong Xi Fa Cai” or wishes for abundance, . This new new year greeting has been viewed over 50 million times on Weibo and is uptrending upwards on Chinese social media.

More about it from the BBC:

A poetic phrase with origins in Chinese literature, it means “may you be immune from 100 toxins”.

The greeting is also being used as a hashtag to help spread public health information. Xue Zhiqian, a pop star, told his Weibo fans: “Hope you don’t stay away from the office. Don’t go outdoors. Don’t spread the virus. Don’t believe in rumours. Bai du bu qin, stay true and pure.”

It has been taken up as a slogan of unity and encouragement to carry on in the midst of a fearful time. The hashtag “people unite together, bai du bu qin” has trended in China.

“Immunity from 100 toxins” appears to have originated in a verse by the Cambridge-educated poet Xu Zhimo, and also makes an appearance in the fiction of Louis Cha, a martial arts novelist, but was not known to be said at holidays.

It implies having great self-control and determination as well as not easily succumbing to disease.

https://www.bbc.com/news/51286633

Sama, sama: China & US?

In China on 28/01/2020 at 4:08 am

The FT recently reported that the CEOS of 18 small British telecoms companies met at a London bank two months ago to discuss investment, strategy and mergers in the telco sector.

At the beginning of the meeting, to get everyone into a participatory mood, they were asked two questions.

They were asked if they thought the Chinese could eavesdrop through “backdoors” in Huawei equipment. Every single hand went up.

They were then asked, if they thought the US could eavesdrop through key Cisco equipment.

All the hands went straight back up without hesitation

S’pore telcos use a lot of Cisco stuff (internet related) and are starting to use Huawel because its cheap and excellent. Nokia’s and Ericsson’s stuff are expensive and juz OK.

Two more Chinese cities disallow travel for reunion dinners

In China on 24/01/2020 at 5:24 am

And Beijing cancels public events, closes Forbidden City.

Further to the restrictions on travel in Wuhan (China abolishes Chinese New Year reunion dinners), the international media report that similar restrictions now apply to nearby Huanggang city and Ezhou city.

In the forner, residents were told not to leave without a special reason, according to an announcement on a city government website. In Ezhou, trains were stopped from leaving or entering the city.

And

Beijing was cancelling large public events, including lunar new year celebrations, because of the coronavirus. Beijing’s Forbidden City, one of China’s biggest tourist attractions, said it would close until further notice.

FT report

The coming Rat year is not sounding good for Grandpa Xi. Swine fever, HK and Taiwan mooning him, and now a SARs like problem.  Why one-party rule sucks for Xi, Lee and Heng

China abolishes Chinese New Year reunion dinners

In China, Holidays and Festivals on 23/01/2020 at 5:46 am

OK, OK I exaggerate. It’s only cancelled if you live in Wuhan and yr family lives elsewhere.

Public transport in Wuhan is suspended from Thursday morning in an effort to contain the outbreak of a deadly Sars-like virus. Residents are urged not to leave the city except under special circumstances. To enforce this encouragement, the airport and train stations temporarily are closed, news agencies cited Chinese state media as saying on Wednesday night.

More at https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-51215348

Btw, trumpets please: SARS all over again.

What HK tycoons did to assuage China’s anger

In China, Hong Kong on 21/01/2020 at 6:30 am

Last September, following a prediction that came true, I doubled down on the prediction stakes:

My next prediction is that before 1 October, the tycoons will make a huge gesture and, for them expensive, on cheap housing to placate Beijing

HK: Trumpets pls/ Next prediction

(The Chinese state media outlets were criticising Hong Kong’s tycoons for the lack of affordable housing in the territory.)

On 25 September, this story appeared

New World donates almost a fifth of its farmland reserves towards building public homes to ease Hong Kong’s housing woes

  • New World Development will donate 3 million square feet of farmland to Hong Kong’s government and toward charity for building public homes
  • The first part of the donation, comprising 28,000 square feet of land next to the Tin Shui Wai subway station, will be turned into 100 three-storey homes measuring 300 square feet each by 2022

https://www.scmp.com/business/article/3030317/new-world-development-donates-3-million-square-feet-farm-land-ease-hong

Adrian Cheng had announced that the New World Development would donate 3m square feet of land (a lot of land: fifth of the co’s reserves) to the government and charitable groups for subsidised housing developments. “We are very concerned about [Hong Kong’s] housing problem,” Mr Cheng said. His late grandfather founded New World Development, a ports, property and retail conglomerate.

Rival groups including Mr Li’s CK Asset Holdings and Lee Shau-kee’s Henderson Land then signalled their willingness to make similar land grants or ramp up their charitable activities. Mr Li’s charitable foundation also announced HK$1bn ($129m) in grants for small business owners affected by the protests.

These gestures appear to have appeased China. The rioters also helped the tycoons, by rioting for freedom. Pressure from Beijing on the tycoons lessened after a new wave of violent protests began in early October which continued through mid-November.  The rioters came out over the Christmas, New Year holidays.

 

 

SARS all over again

In China on 19/01/2020 at 7:19 am

No not the epidemic but the misinformation from Chinese officials.

For Wuhan to have exported three cases to other countries would imply there would have to be many more cases than have been reported.

Prof Neil Ferguson, UK disease outbreak scientist

The number of people already infected by the mystery virus emerging in China is far greater than official figures suggest, UK scientists have told the BBC. There have been more than 60 confirmed cases of the new coronavirus, but the scientists estimate a figure nearer 1,700.


From 2003

SARS crisis: China admits its big, deadly lie

There have been more than seven times as many SARS cases in Beijing than previously reported, China’s Government admitted last night.

Health authorities conceded there had been 339 cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Beijing alone, with 18 people having died in the capital. There are an additional 402 suspected cases.

Hours after the cover-up was revealed, China announced the sacking from key Communist Party posts of the Health Minister, Zhang Wenkang, and the Beijing Mayor, Meng Xuenong.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/sars-crisis-china-admits-its-big-deadly-lie-20030421-gdgmut.html

———————–

S’pore and HK have been screening air passengers from Wuhan, and US authorities announced similar measures starting on Friday at three major airports in San Francisco, Los Angeles and New York.

Read more at https://www.bbc.com/news/health-51148303

4% growth for China/ Still want to raise GST?

In China, Economy, Political governance, Public Administration on 18/01/2020 at 5:03 am

Official figures show that the world’s second largest economy expanded by 6.1% in 2019 from the year before – the worst figure in 29 years. China has faced weak domestic demand and the impact of a trade war with the US.

But things could get worse for China and the world.

China’s GDP could only grow at 4%.

State Grid, China’s largest utility company, is bracing itself for the rate of economic growth to fall to as low as 4% the next five years in the world’s second-largest economy. If anybody has the finger on the economy’s pulse, it is the largest utility company that supplies the power needed to power industry and homes.

If this comes about, bad for world trade and really bad for us: S’pore: the canary in the coalmine

Still want to raise GST, PAP govt with so much uncertainty? But die die must want to be one-arm swordsman: PAP is like one armed swordsman.

The PAP govt should do itself and us a favour, don’t raise GST until there’s more clarity on global economic growth: How PAP can win 65% plus of the vote.

US energy, manufactured exports to China to cheong

In China, Energy on 16/01/2020 at 4:29 am

Trump has signed a deal with Xi (OK, OK thier sidekicks signed it) on US China trade.

In it, among other things, China has to meet a US$200bn import target in the next two years. If it fails, Trump will restart tweeting bad things about China, raise tariffs etc.

The US Chamber of Commerce estimates that increased Chinese purchases of US agriculture products will account for only about U$32bn of the U$200bn target. This means implying that  will have to import huge amounts of energy, manufactured goods and services to make up the difference.

Xinjiang: What ang moh media doesn’t tell us?

In China on 15/01/2020 at 4:34 am

Do the ang moh tua kees who only read the NYT, Guardian and other woke publications know that in Xinjiang the homeland of  the Uighurs, there are 9m Han Chinese, versus 10m Uighurs.

And that

Many Han people in Xinjiang say they are not bothered by the intrusive security. “We’re all used to it, and in fact we like it because we know it keeps us safe,” says a woman surnamed Chen

https://www.economist.com/china/2020/01/09/many-han-chinese-dont-mind-the-gulag-for-their-uighur-neighbours

I’m sure that the woke will say that the Han Chinese should not be in Xinjiang. But it’s part of China, so why shouldn’t Han Chinese live there. The woke want Xinjiang to be like a red injun reservation in the West?

What’s really eating Xi’s heart out

In China on 29/12/2019 at 5:47 am

Taiwan houses one of the world’s great art collections. The National Palace Museum in Taipei has more than 650,000 antiquities and works of art, mostly from the historic imperial collections in the Forbidden City in Beijing,

The collection spans some 8,000 years, from the Neolithic to the modern. And everything from painting and calligraphy to bronzes, jades, lacquerware, ceramics and textiles.

Remember that about 3,000 crates of treasures from the National Beijing Palace Museum swam over to Taiwan as the government and army of Chiang Kai-shek’s Republic of China retreated to Taiwan after their defeat by Mao Zedong’s Communists.

Maybe the Taiwanese should offer to return the treasures to Xi in return for him allowing Taiwan to declare its independence?

It’s a win, win for both sides. The treasures really belongs to the Forbidden City and Taiwan deserves to be a de jure independent liberal democratic (sort of because they use physical violence in parliament, not juz verbal violence) nation, giving the finger to our dearly departed Harry’s self serving comment that Chinese don’t do democracy.

Chinese inventor, Kiwi manufacturers

In China on 17/12/2019 at 5:39 am

A Chinese inventor created Robo Fish – an electronic, plastic toy that moved in water – which Zuru manufactured. It pulled in $100m in annual sales.

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-50469922

Zuru was set up by three Kiwi siblings. They set up factories in China. Talking of carrying coals to Newcastle. Btw, the family are billionaires now. Btw2, inability to speak Mandarin was not a problem when they set up their first factory in China.

Another story of carrying coals to Newcastle: Bringing robot technology to Japan

What the Hongkies are hoping for by keeping up the protests

In China, Hong Kong on 15/12/2019 at 4:32 am

S’poreans, in general, take the view, that Hongkies are wasting their time protesting against China’s attempts to make HK more like S’pore in terms of political governance: Two cities, two systems

They should juz push for a massive HDB programme (When home ownership is less than 50%?) and other economic goodles.

Well

The hope was that eventually a Mikhail Gorbachev-like figure would appear in China who would allow universal suffrage in Hong Kong, Mr Chan says. “We don’t want to fight on the street. Why do we come out? Because the institution is not workable.”

FT

Wish them well. And remember this story. Given time, things can change.

Many years ago in a far away country a wise old teacher was in trouble with his King. The King sentenced the teacher to death, but listened to the teacher’s appeal.

The teacher pleaded for the King to give him five years in which to teach the King’s horse to talk. The King liked to own unusual things and a talking horse would certainly be unusual and after considerable thought said “yes”.

A friend of the teacher said to the teacher “Why did you make such a rash promise? You know no one has ever taught a horse to talk.” The teacher said in reply: “Sometime before the end of five years:

1. The King might change his mind and pardon me.

2. The King might forget that he sentenced me to death.

3. The King might die.

4. I might die.

5. I might teach the horse to talk.

In any event, I gain five years.”

https://naomistanford.com/2009/02/09/teaching-the-horse-to-talk/

Note that in other versions of the story, the “wise old teacher” is a con-man or trickster.

Great PR BS as Alibaba eats rival’s lunch

In China, Internet on 21/11/2019 at 10:52 am

Pinduoduo (China’s fastest-growing ecommerce site) posted 123% sales growth in its latest quarter, narrowly missing market expectations. Its losses unexpectedly more than doubled, and shares were down 22% in early trading.

“When numbers are really beautiful, it will usually mean . . . we were being too conservative,” said Pinduoduo founder and chief executive Colin Zheng Huang, FT reports. Btw, he owns 44.6% of the co and 89% of the voting power.

He claims Alibaba is asking retailers to choose between the his co or Alibaba.

India die die must compare itself to China

In China, India on 21/11/2019 at 4:50 am

Onion prices in India have soared to eye-watering heights, leading to worries about food inflation and consumer unrest as climate change hits production of one of the country’s most important vegetables.

FT

Sounds like India likes comparing itself to China. If China has a problem with a shortage of pigs to eat, (Grandpa Xi’s biggest headache) die die India must find similar problem.

Why PAP govt will use Huawel?

In China, Political governance, Public Administration on 19/11/2019 at 11:08 am

Despite the PAP govt trying to lick the ass of both Xi and Trump at the same time.

CSIS has a report on the “safe city” technology that Huawei is selling around the world. The facial recognition, licence plate recognition, social media monitoring and other surveillance capabilities it sells are generally being bought by authoritarian countries, raising the charge that Huawei is helping to “export authoritarianism”.

BBC story on surveillance systems that China is exporting often with the help of soft loans: https://www.bbc.com/news/business-50348861?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/technology&link_location=live-reporting-story

Related posts

Where US has to buy from China

Did Hali ask Xi for this app when they met?: Hali’s welcome by the Chinese reminded me that the Chinese have an app that will help Heng and other 4G leaders keep S’pore a one-party state, like China.

S’porean Chinese parents will want this

Cybersecurity: “Ownself hack ownself”

 

Honkies behaving like spoiled brats adopted by ang mohs (Cont’d)

In China, Hong Kong on 04/11/2019 at 5:03 am

In Honkies behaving like spoiled brats adopted by ang mohs, then abandoned,I quoted an FT reader who wrote:

As someone aptly described to me, to BJ, Hong Kong is like a kid who was adopted by western parents when she was young and now rejoining the birth family. But then she doesn’t want to rejoin, she thinks she’s too good for them. She wants to go back to the adopted family, who has left. BJ sees all these in her eyes, and will promote the other kids. HK has fallen out of favour.

My friend Chris Kuan has a better description

Geezer got it wrong, Its more like one of those sob Chinese dramas from the old days. Child brought up by angmoh after being given up by parents. After grown up, parent demand child to be returned and child is kicking and screaming, wanting to remain with the person who brought him up.

What Chris left out is that ang moh told kid they had to return to their real parents albeit with promises from the real parents that the kid could be like ang moh for another 50 years.

Whatever Hongkie kid prefers ang mohs. And in 2018 Hongkies love PAP govt, diss their govt.

HK attracts better quality FTs.

Hongkie FTs more classy

Hongkie FTs more classy cont’d

Problem that PAP doesn’t have even if curry puff prices etc have gone up by 7%

In China, Economy on 02/11/2019 at 6:33 am

Regular readers will know that l like to compare the PAP with the CCP: one is the ruling party in a de-facto one-party state, the other the ruler in a de-jure one party state. Examples: Keeping power in a one-party state and Why one-party rule sucks for Xi, Lee and Heng.

Well food inflation is not an issue here in the coming GE even if Old Chang Kee two weeks ago raised products by 10 cents across the board: roughly a 7% increase. My mum likes their curry puffs (now $1.60 each) while I like their various “balls”. Fortunately, I found another type of curry puff that my mum enjoys. Only $1 each but there may be an issue with consistent taste.

But food inflation is a problem in China. Data from China’s Ministry of Agriculture & Rural Affairs shows  the price of pork has risen 170% compared with the same time last year Chicken prices have increased 40% and beef 20%.

Why food inflation has gone thru the roof in China: Grandpa Xi’s biggest headache.

China’s new opium and the Gweilo selling it

In China on 31/10/2019 at 9:38 am

China’s government is trying to tackle its obesity problem. More than a quarter of Chinese adults, or roughly 350m people, are overweight or obese. Among children, the proportion is one in five, up from just one in 20 in 1995.

From the Economist (Emphasis mine)

Most public-health initiatives—such as “Happy Ten Minutes”, a programme which encourages youngsters to exercise for ten minutes a day—emphasise the importance of physical activity but say little about diet. This may not be an accident. Some academics have pointed to the influence in Chinese public-health campaigns of research institutes financed by Western multinational food-and-drink firms such as Nestlé and Coca-Cola. Cutting out junk food would mean slimming down their sales. Instead, ever more Chinese are turning to bootcamps, liposuction and diet pills.

https://www.economist.com/graphic-detail/2019/10/28/china-worries-about-its-bulging-waistlines

HSBC: West not tua kee

In Banks, China, Hong Kong, India on 31/10/2019 at 4:29 am

In fact ang moh sui jee.

HSBC recently came up with a worse than expected set of results. Despite a US China trade war (HSBC is world’s largest trade financier and China’s the wotld’s workshop) and HK riots, its Asian businesses performed in line with analysts’ expectations.

Ang moh countries under-performed as usual but disappointed the already low expectations

HSBC’s cost-to-income ratio is 104% in Europe, compared with 43% in Asia, where it generates nearly 90% of its profits. The bank makes only a quarter of its lending in Britain, yet the country generates 35% of its non-performing loans … Its $98bn of risk-weighted assets allocated to America produce only $527m in annual profit.

https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/2019/10/28/as-profits-dwindle-hsbc-plans-a-radical-overhaul

Ang mohs are expensive, useless deadbeats. The only Asian country in HSBC’s empire like ang moh land is Ah Neh Land.

Related posts

HK: Why HSBC can still smile: Money withdrawn from mainland banks are deposited into Hang Seng Bank. Majority-owned by HSBC but has its own listing and distinct identity and brand. Google up images of its branches. More on Hang Seng Bank: HSBC, Superman and another Cina superhero.

Why HSBC is really Hongkong Bank

 

 

HOHOHO: Temasek invested in WeWorks’ flea ridden dog

In China, Media, Temasek on 26/10/2019 at 4:10 am

In July 2018, the FT reported that SoftBank, its Saudi-backed Vision Fund, private equity firms Trustbridge Partners and Hony Capital, and our very own Temasek invested in a WeWork subsidiary in China. It was valued at US$5bn.

A year before, after Softbank and Hony put $ into it, it was worth US$1bn.

Great investment that naturally TOC’s M’sian Indian goons never reported. To be fair neither did other alt media publications. I think our constructive, nation-building trumpeted this investment.

Now?

China has emerged as one of WeWork’s worst performing markets as a local operation once seen as critical to the office provider’s global growth suffers from ultra-low occupancy rates and is “bleeding cash”, said people with direct knowledge of the business.

FT

What “ultra-low occupancy rates” mean. FT reported: WeWork locations in October in

Shanghai had a vacancy rate of 35.7% in October,

Shenzhen 65.3% (in Hong Kong only 22.1%  vacant) and

Xi’an, had a vacancy rate of 78.5%.

As reported in ST’s BS about WeWorks Cont’d, WeWorks is exiting China.

Wonder if our constructive, nation-building media will report this fiasco? It trumpeted its success last year.

TikTok data stored here

In China on 25/10/2019 at 3:00 pm

TikTok said all US user data is stored in the United States, with a backup in Singapore

BBC report

Beijing-based Bytedance owns TikTok, a video-sharing app popular in the US. TikTok says it “does not remove content” based on Chinese sensitivities.

This follows concerns raised by US lawmakers over whether Beijing censors content on the app and data collection.

Honkies behaving like spoiled brats adopted by ang mohs, then abandoned

In China, Hong Kong on 22/10/2019 at 5:45 am

(I hope FT doesn’t sue me for this copy and paste.)

This is a thread in an FT article on HK. Doesn’t Passeby’s first two paragraphs remind you of the typical S’porean response to the unrest in HK?

Passerby
I wish the parents of the teenager rioters lose their job and have to tell their rioter children they can no longer afford school and data plan and food for them. And these spoiled brats have to actually go out and live life and earn money. Yeh, maybe then they would appreciate a little more having stability in the society and the economic benefits the motherland China provides.

But then it would be too late, as this is not some kind of game. Macau is setting up their stock exchange. Shenzhen is taking over HK. Hong Kong will forever have lost its lustre.

As someone aptly described to me, to BJ, Hong Kong is like a kid who was adopted by western parents when she was young and now rejoining the birth family. But then she doesn’t want to rejoin, she thinks she’s too good for them. She wants to go back to the adopted family, who has left. BJ sees all these in her eyes, and will promote the other kids. HK has fallen out of favour.

The cost of these few months is immeasurable, and irrecoverable.

Hong Kong burns, and no one else burns with Hong Kong.

The responses were pretty good too

concerned n america
Maybe the HK kid sees the Muslim Uigher kid Getting their organs harvested and clearly doesn’t want to rejoin the evil family.

Aloha
@Passerby

Deep in the psyche of every Wumao is this shame that they have to justify and defend the death of hundreds of unarmed college students in Tiananmen in 1989 with jobs and economic growth. That if the Chinese Communist Party has not shot those protestors, their lives would somehow be worse off. That is the argument they have to repeat to themselves and to others.

South Korea had also had its ‘Tiananmen’ and people also died. But South Korea have confronted the past and is able to talk about it. Consider that South Korea is a country smaller than some Chinese provinces and what it has achieved economically. It’s a lie that the Chinese communist party wants people to buy in: that only the Chinese communist party can provide stability and economic growth.

Also no more Hong Kong means no more Chinese communist party members able to hid their ill gotten money off shore from mainland China.

Related posts:

Stop being fascinated with HK riots, look closer home

Financial aspects of protests

Attempt to bring down HK’s financial system fails: yet again

Why HSBC is really Hongkong Bank

China says it needs HK as a financial centre

Two cities, two systems

In China, Hong Kong on 19/10/2019 at 5:45 am

Singapore and Hong Kong have long offered rival political models. Singapore, put crudely, is an illiberal democracy; Hong Kong a liberal autocracy. One has a freely elected government but strict laws limiting, for example, public protest and some political debate. The other has a chief executive “elected” by a few hundred officials, a partially elected and weak legislature, but robust traditions of freedom of speech and assembly. Singapore has been pointing, discreetly, to its relative stability. On October 4th the foreign ministry advised Singaporeans to “defer non-essential travel” to Hong Kong.

https://www.economist.com/asia/2019/10/10/singapore-stands-to-gain-from-hong-kongs-troubles?fbclid=IwAR0v8guoxejGop67vdUO8Q7I5h_tqQfl6GU-R-sbIf0ysKxJJMJDGPBjQUs

HK still top dog vis-a-vis S’pore: China says it needs HK as a financial centre

Got this  right: HK: Who Beijing really blames for the protests and riots

Got this wrong: but HK’s CEO has announced that govt will seize back unbuilt land from tycoons to build public housing. This was a no-no since colonial days.

HK: Trumpets pls/ Next prediction

Grandpa Xi’s biggest headache

In China, Commodities on 17/10/2019 at 5:23 am

No it’s not the quai lan Hongkies. or Mad Dog Chee’s cousin Trump. He has a much bigger problem which means he can’t focus on HK or US China political and trade relations.

The price of pork, the most popular meat in China, jumped by 69.3% compared with September last year. The rapid rise in pork prices means that China’s consumer price index is up by 3% year on year in September, the largest increase since November 2013. The rise in pork prices contributes nearly half a percentage point to headline inflation.

The outbreak of African swine fever has cut China’s pig population by 39% and led to led to rationing and price controls in at least one Chinese city.

The govt has started releasing frozen pork from its reserves, starting with 10,000 tonnes. There are subsidies for new pig farms and plans to breed bigger pigs. (Btw, frozen pork is tenderer than chilled pork according to a S’pore study reported by our constructive, nation-building CNA)

Meanwhile, pork related stocks are cheong.

Background to Trump’s appeal to China on Bidens

In China on 05/10/2019 at 5:19 am

Trump had suggested on Thursday that the Chinese authorities could help dig up dirt on Mr Joe Biden and his son Hunter’s business dealings in China. Trump is already facing a  very rapidly escalating political crisis because of an impeachment inquiry.

The impeachment inquiry focuses on a whistleblower’s claim that the president put pressure on the Ukrainian president to investigate Joe Biden, the former vice-president and his potential rival in the 2020 presidential race.

Trump has now exacerbated the situation by asking for help from China, a nation that his own White House labelled a “revisionary power”.

Here’s what the BBC says:

What about the Bidens in China?

In 2013, then vice-president Mr Biden went to China on an official visit, where he met Chinese President Xi Jinping and other officials.

Hunter Biden and his daughter joined the vice-president, who had travelled with family members before.

During the two-day visit, Hunter met a Chinese banker, Jonathan Li, who would eventually become a business partner.

Mr Li founded a private equity fund shortly after the trip, and Hunter was on the board, although a spokesman for the younger Mr Biden told NBC News they did not discuss any business during the trip and the fund had been planned months earlier.

Hunter Biden was also not an equity owner in the fund during his father’s term as vice-president, according to the spokesman.

Hunter has denied meeting any Chinese officials about the business. However, he reportedly helped arrange for Mr Li to shake hands with Joe Biden during his trip to Beijing, which stoked claims of influence-peddling.

This August, Republican Senator and Finance Chairman Chuck Grassley questioned Hunter’s actions on the trip.

He said the younger Biden had a “history of investing in and collaborating with Chinese companies, including at least one posing significant national security concerns”.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-49924579?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/world/us_and_canada&link_location=live-reporting-story

There is also a story that a Chinese SWF invested a billion US$ in a hedge fund connected to Hunter. No credible evidence of this.

Heaven publicly humiliated Xi on his big day

In China on 03/10/2019 at 10:42 am

No, not the riots in HK or Hongkies stepping on his pictures of his face: How Beijing and HK celebrating today

No, it was a lot worse. Heaven rained on his parade. Not literally but on China’s National Day,  Beijing was under a blanket of smog. So, under hazy skies, Xi presided over the military parade on the 70th anniversary of the day Mao Zedong declared the founding of the People’s Republic in Tiananmen Square.

Don’t believe me, go look at the pixs of the parade. An example is above. Also look at the photos in https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-49891769?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/world/asia&link_location=live-reporting-story

Smog in Tiananmen Square on the 70th anniversary of the day Mao Zedong declared the founding of the People’s Republic is politically and symbolically important because on China’s National Day two yrs ago, Xi called for clearer skies.

Didn’t happen did it on the most important day in the Chinese political calendar? And on a landmark anniversary: the 70th anniversary.

The people of China are quietly taking note that Heaven doesn’t give face to Xi, unlike its treatment of Mao. A few months before he died, there was a massive earthquake that killed many people.

 

How Beijing and HK celebrating today

In China, Hong Kong on 01/10/2019 at 10:35 am

In Beijing, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of China’s liberation by the CCP, there is a big military parade presided over by Xi,

In HK:

[I]mages of Mr Xi will be glued on to walkways so that protesters can stamp on him as they pass by.

FT

Btw, FT’s great coverage of HK: HK: What MSM and alt media don’t tell us

Thicker than even blood: The PAP way is the CCP way.

 

China says it needs HK as a financial centre

In China, Hong Kong on 28/09/2019 at 7:00 am

OK, OK not China but the constructive, nation building People’s Daily: Xi’s answer to our ST.

In an editorial on September 16, the paper said that HK was irreplaceable for China because of its importance as an offshore renminbi trading hub, its rule of law, its role as a risk and wealth management centre and its place as one of the freest economies in the world.

Well you heard it from China’s ST, not from some CIA funded ang moh running dog ang moh media like the FT or Economist or NYT who have also said this. As by the way as does once cybernut hero Chris Kuan.

Why isn’t Terry Online’s Service taking stuff from him. Secret Squirrel tells me it’s because he tells it as it is. Terry only wants stuff that puts the PAP govt in a bad light, even if it means faking the facts: Why TOC’s Danisha Hakeem is a menace to the credibility of alt media. Btw, he’s a S’porean.

Sorry coming back to HK.

Financial aspects of protests

Attempt to bring down HK’s financial system fails: yet again

Why HSBC is really Hongkong Bank

Tourism is 40% down because mainlanders are not coming and Swiss cos are affected.

HK: Trumpets pls/ Next prediction

In China, Hong Kong on 16/09/2019 at 7:25 am

I got this right.

Last week, in HK: Who Beijing really blames for the protests and riots, I wrote

Morocco Mole (Secret Squirrel’s side-kick) says that his second cousin twice removed in the CCP Central Committee says that Xi is planning to make these tycoons make big public donations (billions of dollars) to the HK govt which will use the money to do things like build cheap (not “affordable”) public housing. Remember you read of this first here.

On Saturday, the People’s Daily (China’s ST) demanded that the HK tycoons show their sincerity instead of “hoarding land for profit and earning every last penny”. All in all, there were separate editorials in three major constructive, nation-building state-owned media outlets attacking the property tycoons. They all suggested that HK authorities seize undeveloped land and use it to build more housing. Fyi, they are so powerful that the HK govt was planning to reclaim land from the sea to build public housing on, because the tycoons did not want building on vacant land state land.

My next prediction is that before 1 October, the tycoons will make a huge gesture and, for them expensive, on cheap housing to placate Beijing and, hopefully, the protesters. Remember that 1st October is an important date in Xi’s calender.

On that day, Beijing will be hoping to project an image of national strength and unity with a military parade through the city to mark 70 years since the founding of the People’s Republic of China.

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/09/14/asia/china-hong-kong-october-1-intl-hnk/index.html

And the HK protesters are planning a big do to spoil Xi’s big day in Beijing. They aim to grab the attention of the ang moh media who live by “If it bleeds, it leads”, preferring to showing scenes of violence rather than boring march-pasts of of tanks and missiles.

————————–

Financial aspects of protests

Attempt to bring down HK’s financial system fails: yet again

Why HSBC is really Hongkong Bank

Tourism is 40% down because mainlanders are not coming and Swiss cos are affected.

————————————————————-

Meanwhile, both sides are aware of the 800-pound gorilla in the room: US Cavalry riding to rescue HK from chief Xi?

Finally, Who is the superhero of protestors and short-sellers?

HK: Who Beijing really blames for the protests and riots

In China, Hong Kong on 13/09/2019 at 3:04 pm

Chinese officials and their running dogs have publicly blamed the West (CIA. MI6, etc etc) for instigating the ang moh tua kee Hongkies.

The int’l press meanwhile have been highlighting that the local tycoons had been assuring Beijing that all was well: focusing on the big picture economic numbers and gliding over or misrepresenting awkward data like the declining affordability of housing*. They also reported that Beijing officials were privately grumbling about being misled by local tycoons.

So it was interesting that when the Economist and the NYT recently interviewed Ren Zhengfei, Huawei’s founder: he said he thinks that Honkie tycoons were “too greedy”

Asked about the unrest in Hong Kong, the Huawei boss voices aloud a criticism that other members of the mainland elite normally voice in private: that the tycoons who dominate the former British colony have been too greedy over the years. “The issue in Hong Kong has been caused by extreme capitalism. The four major families have made enormous amounts of money,” he says, detailing how the same few property magnates control the economy down to its humblest newspaper kiosks and coffee shops. “A lesson we are learning from the current situation in Hong Kong is that the divide between the rich and poor shouldn’t be too large,” he says.

https://www.economist.com/china/2019/09/12/huaweis-founder-defends-deng-xiaopings-chinese-model

Morocco Mole (Secret Squirrel’s side-kick) says that his second cousin twice removed in the CCP Central Committee says that Xi is planning to make these tycoons make big public donations (billions of dollars) to the HK govt which will use the money to do things like build cheap (not “affordable”) public housing. Remember you read of this first here.


*Bit like grassroot leaders telling PM and his millionaire ministers that the grumblings of people like me between 2007 and the calling of GE 2011 was “juz noise” and didn’t reflect reality: voters were happy with the PAP. As PM admitted, he and his ministers realised the truth during the campaigning and he apologised: BG Yeo wants to lead Opposition within the PAP?.

Eat yr heart out, HK doomsters, hedgies

In China, Hong Kong on 12/09/2019 at 4:11 am

The Chinese are buying HK shares. Better still state-owned cos are suspected to be doing much of the buying at the behest of Xi.

Since the start of the year, net purchases of Hong Kong stocks by mainland Chinese investors had reached almost HK$160bn ($20bn) by the close of the market last Friday. This is almost double net inflows of HK$82.7bn for all of 2018. The buying was made through stock connect programmes of the Shanghai and Shenzhen stock exchanges.

Related posts:

Attempt to bring down HK’s financial system fails: yet again

Hedgies con trick unravels

US Cavalry riding to rescue HK from chief Xi?

In China, Hong Kong on 11/09/2019 at 10:37 am

Or to be a lot more accurate, will the US Congress pass “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act”?

The proposed bill would allow the US government to place sanctions on Chinese officials who “suppress basic freedoms” in Hong Kong and would require it to regularly certify the city’s “high degree of autonomy” in order for it to continue to enjoy preferential trade and investment policies not available to mainland China.

Last weekend, there was the usual massive peaceful protest followed by small scale but very violent riots. HK protesters were marching, asking the US congress to pass the above act. Many of the marchers, from elderly retirees, young families and students, carried US flags, or placards bearing the face of Donald Trump to call on the him to support them.

————————————————————————————–

How Hongkies justify flying US flag

The US flag is about freedom and bravery,” said one, a 30-year-old who gave his name as Peter. “It’s not about supporting the US government, it’s about the value behind the flag no matter who the US president is at the time. The flag and the freedom doesn’t change.

Quote from FT

Tun manufacturing another row to stir his anti-PAP S’porean fans?

Btw, carrying placards with The Donald’s face on them is a smart way of currying his favour. He can tell Xi, “I’m more popular then you in Hong Kong.”

—————————————————————-

The US Congress will return this week after its summer recess. The Hong Kong bill has widespread bipartisan support.

China’s leaders must either respect Hong Kong’s autonomy and rule of law or know that their escalating aggression will inexorably lead them to face swift, severe and lasting consequences from the United States and the world. Today, that choice is theirs.”

Marco Rubio, a former US presidential candidate and co-sponsor of the bill.

Another example of the Americans’ attitude: Americans and Chinese lay down the law to HK

 

 

 

 

 

China, the copy cat

In China, Currencies on 08/09/2019 at 4:23 am

China’s central bank has been working on its very own crypto-currency, which is close to being unveiled.

What is interesting is that the Chinese are saying that it will bear a similarity to Facebook’s Libra virtual currency.

Consumers will be able to use it to pay for things on major mobile payment platforms like Alipay and WeChat, Mu Changchun, deputy director of the People’s Bank of China’s payments department told Reuters.

The aim is for the tokens of this crypto-current to be as safe as paper money issued by the central bank, and can be used even without an internet connection.

Facebook announced in June that it planned to launch its own global digital currency. Since then there has been KPKBing from regulators, bank chiefs and politicians. They are afraid it will be difficult to regulate.

Another example of Chinese copying. When I posted this, Sci-fi can help defeat the PAP?, a sci-fi fan said that the Chinese Sci-fi story mentioned was nothing more than a rip-off from an ang moh story. Sad.

With US cos like these, Xi can give Trump the finger

In China on 05/09/2019 at 4:02 am

Further to With Apple as a US co, USA doesn’t need enemies, here’s more on US cos who have decided to give Trump, and others who have serious concerns about China — congress, and the defence and security establishments — the bird. The Donald, congress and defence and security establishments think that China is the new USSR and must be contained.

But investments by US companies in China have grown this year despite the worsening trade row. Some American businesses want to benefit from China’s expanding consumer market.

US companies invested US$6.8bn into China in the first half of the year, up 1.5% from the average during the same period over the past two years, according to the Rhodium Group, a consultancy.

Most of the US$6.8bn

went into greenfield projects, such as electric vehicle maker Tesla’s factory in Shanghai, which will be the first wholly foreign-owned auto plant in China. Other large deals included US fund Bain Capital’s $570m investment in data centre provider Beijing Qinhuai.

FT

Btw, this data contradicts China’s official data but the FT says this data is more reliable

And btw2, late last week, The Donald said was ready to use emergency powers to compel US companies to stop doing business with Beijing. But according to the FT, US cos think he’s talking cock.

Here’s why US cos are prepared to put profits before patriotism:

US retailer Costco was forced to close early on its opening day in China, after the store was swamped with shoppers.

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-49492326

But Grandpa Xi has Chinese cos that are just as unpatriotic as American cos: With cos like these, China doesn’t need enemies like Trump

HK protests affect Swiss cos

In China, Hong Kong, Tourism on 04/09/2019 at 4:06 am

The protests have led to share price falls for Swiss watchmakers Richemont and Swatch Group. They had fallen after previous unrest in 2014 but then recovered.

It’s all about tourists (especially from the mainland) buying their stuff: Why ang moh luxury brands lick Chinese p***ies.

Japan helps Africans to fight “Chinese debt trap”

In Accounting, China, Japan, Public Administration on 31/08/2019 at 4:07 am

Japan is hosting the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (Ticad) summit. And Japan’s prime minister, Shinzo Abe, is the co-host.

He warned African leaders about the dangers of accumulating too much debt, the AFP news agency reports. His comments are seen as a snarky warning about China’s role in Africa as Beijing is said to favour its own companies for big infrastructure projects.

He told the leaders attending the development conference in Yokohama that Japan was promoting “quality” investments to be supported by Japanese institutions, the agency reports.

Unlike China, Japan says sound financial advice and support is behind its Africa strategy.

Tokyo plans to train experts in 30 African countries in the next three years on how to manage risk and public debts, it says. It wants to send financial experts to debt-ridden countries on multi-year missions to help them improve their finances and thus avoud the “Chinese debt trap”: overborrowing from the Chinese, being dependent on the Chinese for financing and having to sell assets to repay the debts.

He said more entrepreneurs should be encouraged to improve economies on the continent.

“If partner countries are deeply in debt, it interferes with everyone’s efforts to enter the market,” the Japanese prime minister was quoted as saying.

 

 

 

 

With Apple as a US co, USA doesn’t need enemies

In China on 24/08/2019 at 11:33 am

The US-China tech war is all about “decoupling”. But Apple is sourcing its iPhone screens from a Chinese state-owned enterprise, according to the Nikkei Asian Review.

Apple is about to decide on whether to add BOE Technology Group, a leading display maker, to its next iPhone procurement list. If BOE passes the test, their organic light emitting displays, or OLED, will be used in two iPhone models to be released next year. If BOE gets the contract, it will mark a breakthrough for China’s industry.

BOE, which supplies the screens for Huawei’s latest phones, is an emerging industry leader. So from this perspective, Apple’s consideration is rational. But political imperatives could intervene as the US ramps up commercial pressure on China to contain its advances in high-tech.

If Apple chooses BOE’s screens, it could begin to challenge Samsung’s supremacy in the display sector. However, the Chinese company remains vulnerable to a potential clampdown from Washington, possibly restricting supplies of crucial materials from US companies such as Corning, 3M and Applied Materials.

Btw, Trump gave Apple the finger when it  asked him for exemption for some products. He told them to make them in the USA.

With cos like these, China doesn’t need enemies like Trump

In China, Uncategorized on 24/08/2019 at 4:26 am

Chinese businesses were obeying Trump even before Trump tweeted to US cos, (not Chinese cos)

Our great American companies are hereby ordered to immediately start looking for an alternative to China, including bringing your companies home and making your products in the USA.

Chinese companies are following MNCs in leaving China, and using alternative production bases to mitigate the impact of the trade war with the US

Since last June, 33 listed companies have informed China’s two stock exchanges of their plans to set up or expand production abroad, according to data compiled by the Nikkei Asian Review.

To be fair to them, multiple rounds of tariffs on Chinese goods are only part of the equation. Rising wages and other costs, are prompting Chinese companies to move out of the country.

Trump the Dumbo

In China on 19/08/2019 at 2:07 pm

He didn’t know tariffs on Chinese imports hurt Apple but helped Samsung.

US President Donald Trump said he has spoken to Apple’s Chief Executive Tim Cook about the impact of US tariffs on Chinese imports – and how those duties could give an edge to rival Samsung.

Mr Trump said Mr Cook “made a good case” that the tariffs could hurt Apple, given Samsung’s products wouldn’t be subject to the duties.

“I thought he made a very compelling argument, so I’m thinking about it,” said Mr Trump.

The US is due to impose tariffs on an additional $300bn (£246.9bn) worth of Chinese products this year, even after the Trump administration recently said it would delay imposing tariffs on goods such as mobile phones, laptops, video game consoles and computer monitors until 15 December.

How China is squeezing Trump’s balls

In China, Tourism on 18/08/2019 at 4:27 am

Tens of thousands of Chinese tourists are shunning the country as a holiday destination, and companies from Tiffany to Hyatt Hotels are counting the cost.

FT

It goes to say US business love tourists from China because on average they spend U$7,000 per including the costs of flights and accommodation, according to data from the US Travel Association.

After several years of double-digit growth, however, Chinese visitor numbers rose only 4% in 2017 and last year they declined for the first time since 2003. There were 2.99m arrivals in 2018, a drop of 6% from 2017. This trend is continuing this summer. US executives say the slowdown is weighing on profits.

Trump will cry “Uncle” when retailers renting space in Trump properties go bust.

Huawei: More bad hair days

In China on 17/08/2019 at 5:59 pm

Further to its problems in China (Huawei accused of saying Taiwan is independent), Huawei has now had to deny a Wall Street report that its technicians were involved in intelligence-gathering operations in Uganda Zambia and Algeria on behalf of the countries’ govts.

And US technology and telecoms companies still do not know whether they will be able to sell to Huawei after Monday, when a temporary export licence runs out.

Time for Huawei’s founder to call in the Feng Shui masters? But then he’s a CCP member. The CCP requires members to be atheists.

Huawei accused of saying Taiwan is independent

In China on 17/08/2019 at 1:48 pm

Versace, Coach, Givenchy, and Swarovski faced criticism this week for listing Hong Kong, Macau, and Taiwan as a separate countries or regions – not part of China – on their official websites or branded T-shirts.

Well now Huawei is accused of implying in its smartphone settings that Taiwan is independent.

[U]sers on Chinese social media Weibo have expressed anger that Taiwan was listed as its own country when the default language in Huawei’s smartphone setting was set to traditional Chinese – the script used in Taiwan and Hong Kong. Mainland China mostly uses simplified Chinese.

“This is outrageous. This is how Huawei repays China?” one user said on Weibo.

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-49366177

 

Another headache for Xi

In China, Commodities on 16/08/2019 at 6:28 am

Eastern Europe sees sharp rise in swine fever outbreaks

Growing signs that devastating virus that has gripped Asia could hit Europe
FT headline

This reminded me that a few weeks Cranswick was the biggest riser in the FTSE 250 index after reporting that trading in the first quarter of the financial year had been encouraging.

It said Asian export revenues were strongly ahead of the corresponding period last year, reflecting increased demand from China following the widespread outbreak of Africa swine fever.

Well, the problems in Chinese pork production and the resulting inflation in pork prices is not good news for Xi.

China’s pork imports surged nearly 63% in May from the same month last year, customs data showed on Sunday, as the world’s top consumer of the meat stocked up on supplies ahead of an anticipated shortage.

….

China’s pork prices rose rapidly in the first-half of March, triggering large purchases of meat from overseas markets, including the United States.

Prices have since stabilised, with importers and traders saying demand in recent weeks for imported frozen pork has been very weak amid plentiful supplies of fresh pork from farmers slaughtering their herds as the disease reaches new areas.

Demand is likely to pick up again in coming months, however. Beijing said earlier this month that the country’s sow herd fell by 23.9% in May from a year earlier, a huge drop that will create a significant decline in output.

Analysts at Rabobank said in April that China’s pork output could fall to just 38 million tonnes in 2019, versus 54 million tonnes last year.

Imports would be capped at about 4 million tonnes, they said, based on available world supplies.

https://www.reuters.com/article/china-economy-trade-pork/corrected-chinas-pork-imports-surge-in-may-near-3-yr-high-idUSL4N23V0I2

Related posts:

China will eat & eat

Chinese zodiac’s animals: global distribution per capita

 

Interesting, relevant, little known facts about HK’s general strike

In China, Hong Kong on 06/08/2019 at 10:35 am

Strike brings Hong Kong to a standstill as political crisis deepens

Transport network crippled and flights cancelled as police clash with protesters
FT Headline

It went on

Advertising and banking employees joined construction and retail workers to take part in Hong Kong’s first general strike in half a century, showing how anti-government sentiment is now building among professionals.

There were the usual clashes and the use of tear gas by the police.

Here’s some facts that are not well known but relevant in analysing the situation in HK

There hasn’t been a general strike [in Hong Kong] since the 1960s when the Beijing-controlled unions called the strikes,” Antony Dapiran. He has written a book on the history of dissent in HK. So if the West is really behind the protests as Beijing alleges, cannot isit? Juz retaliating ler.

A HK conglomerate (Secret Squirrel tells me HK Special Branch tells him it’s the Jardine Group) said via an unofficial but authoritative spokesperson that employees who choose not to come to work on Monday could count it as a “work from home”. Seems Swire Group also had a similar policy. Both are British Hongs.

The local HK conglomerates (Cheung Kong, Hutch etc) juz said nothing as they hope not to upset Beijing, the HK govt, or their HK employees.

An HSBC spokesman said: “We respect that our employees have their own personal views on political and social matters. Our priorities are the safety of our employees and supporting our customers.”

A 34-year-old HSBC bank employee said the bank had not officially sanctioned the strike on Monday but some managers had told staff verbally they would not be penalised for not coming to work.

FT

Remember that HSBC includes the Hang Seng Bank which has a lot of branches serving the people: the takeover of Hang Seng Bank was the start of HSBC becoming a global bank: HSBC, Superman and another Cina superhero.

StanChart, Citi etc kept quiet hoping not to upset Beijing, the HK govt or their employees.

Btw, HSBC’s retail business holds billions of dollars in deposits in HK, and has a leading position in mortgages: both may suffer if instability worsens.

Trump the moron

In China, Currencies on 03/08/2019 at 3:00 pm

Trump wants a weaker US$: Another reason for Trump to be upset with UK.

But as Seema Shah, chief strategist at Principal Global Investors said his plans to impose a fresh 10% tariff on another US$300bn of Chinese products will result in a further strengthening of the US dollar – already at a two-year high before the tariff announcement – “as investors inevitably rush for its perceived safety”.

“Furthermore, US tariffs will weaken China’s economy and others that are intricately tied to China’s supply chains, putting downward pressure on their currencies and upward pressure on the US dollar.

“The reality is that the US has a far greater ability to control its own currency than Europe, which is beset with problems including Italian instability, an unbalanced economy across the bloc and fiscal tightness. At some point, the Trump administration may realise that the most effective and beneficial route to weakening the US dollar will be correcting the underlying fundamentals, not intervention.

“The quickest route to a cheaper dollar is ending the trade war”.

 

Americans and Chinese lay down the law to HK

In China, Hong Kong on 30/07/2019 at 4:19 am

The Americans were very aggressive, while the Chinese were very wishy washy, mouthing platitudes.

The American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong (AmCham members represent sectors ranging from financial services to logistics and tech) has called on the government to take immediate action to restore business confidence in HK, including a complete withdrawal of the controversial bill that would have enabled extraditions to mainland China.

It suggested the government restore confidence by “formally and completely” withdrawing the extradition bill “to remove any room for continued public doubt” among other measures, it said in a statement.

What I found funny was that this statement was sent following a survey of its members. Only 12% responded to the survey according to the FT yet

“A clear majority of our membership surveyed over the past week said the government needs to address the underlying causes of the protests and not simply to paper over the cracks of social instability with a short-term law-and-order fix,” said AmCham President Tara Joseph.

(BBC report)

Meanwhile, the Chinese comments were pretty mild.

“We hope that… people will stand firm in defence of the rule of law,” a spokesman for the government’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office said.

Adding “We call on the general public of Hong Kong to be aware of the grave nature of the current situation.”

He condemned “the evil and criminal acts committed by the radical elements” in Hong Kong.

“We noticed he Hong Kong government has earnestly reflected on its inadequacies over its work on the extradition bill, and Carrie Lam said on July 1 she would change her governing style to be more open and tolerant in listening to Hong Kong people’s feedback.”

HK has seen eight consecutive weekends of protests.

Wechat conquers China, Facebook the world

In China, Internet on 27/07/2019 at 1:32 pm

WeChat has 1.1bn users in China (Peanuts round the rest of the world including HK), but Facebook has long outgrown the US market to boast 2.3bn* users worldwide according to Matt Sheehan at MacroPolo.  He has been looking at the quality of data collection and analysis in China and the US and compares the capabilities of the US and China.


*2.4bn as of June.

New headache for Heng

In China, Economy on 27/07/2019 at 6:14 am

Trump realises that S’pore’s freeloading off the US, and has told the US trade representative to fix the freeloading. The good news is that China and a whole host of countries are in the same situation.

In a memo to Robert Lighthizer, the US trade representative, on Friday, Mr Trump has yet again attacked the World Trade Organization, saying it allowed too many countries to claim the status of a developing economy and special treatment that is damaging the global trading system (i.e. damaging America).

As well as usual suspect China, he mentioned other countries that he thought should not be classified as developing., This included S’pore and two other   Asian city-states such as Hong Kong and Macau, as well as Gulf countries such as Kuwait, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates. He also said Turkey, South Korea and Mexico claimed the status of a developing nation, even though they were part of the OECD group of advanced economies. On these three countries I agree with him that their status of “developing nation” is illogical.

What about India meh? Can developing nation afford to send robots to the moon, even if the rocket is rubbish? Failed to launch first time. Had to repeat. Secret Squirrel’s sidekick, Morocco Mole, says his Indian cousin twice removed says the fault lay with made-in-India software. And we still relying on Indian software expertise for projects like SingPass? Re: SingPass technical support versus that of OCBC and HSBC and SingPass sucks, really sucks. (To be fair to SingPass, it does work well after one gets into the system. But getting to that stage was a struggle as the posts show.)

He reminded the benefits that came from having developing economy status at the WTO, including procedural advantages in disputes, softer tariff cuts, the ability to maintain export subsidies and weaker commitments in negotiations.

Related posts:

If China withdraws behind the Great Walls

Why Sino-US Cold War is great for our economy

“Only cold spell coming, but not Winter”

IMF affirms support for PAP policies.

If China withdraws behind the Great Walls

In China on 25/07/2019 at 4:50 am

McKinsey Global Institute thinks the world stands to lose up to U$37tn if China withdraws from the world as a result of tensions with the west. Tech forms a big part of this amount. Btw, 90% of technologies used in China follow global standards.

HK: Inconvenient truths for China and West/ FT PAP missed

In China, Hong Kong on 23/07/2019 at 5:33 am

As the letter to the Editor of the Economist (see below) points out

— “The promise of universal suffrage as the ultimate aim appears in the Basic Law”, HK’s “constitution” that was approved by Beijing. One in the eye for China for being that stupid. Another in the eye for now changing it’s mind. Why pretend in the first place?

— The British only took “action to return power to the people until they learned that there would be no hope of extending British rule beyond 1997”: “Perfidious Albion” as the French would say. Saboing China isit? Planting a bomb and hoping it would explode after they left?

To be fair to the British Foreign Office, the mandarins there were appalled by the decision of Chris Patten (last governor of HK but the first British politician to hold that post) endorsed by the British cabinet to give the HK people democratic rights which the British had long withheld from them.

The mandarins like the Chinese leaders thought that HK would be returned to China on an “as is” basis. The clock on political and social changes had stopped at the time the Sino-British joint declaration on the future of Hong Kong was agreed upon, unless both sides agreed to changes. But Patten saw a loophole in the declaration, and sensed that China did not want to make HK people more fearful of China by publicly kicking up a huge fuss about giving the HK people democratic rights previously denied to them.

The letter is from a pro-China member of LegCo. She was the Secretary for Security and tried to pass some really draconian laws but the Hongkies demonstrated and the laws never passed.

I must take issue with “China’s chance” (June 22nd), which ascribed the recent turmoil in Hong Kong to China’s alleged suppression of Hong Kong’s freedoms and reluctance to grant the territory universal suffrage in electing its chief. China has gone much further than Britain in democratising Hong Kong. The promise of universal suffrage as the ultimate aim appears in the Basic Law, Hong Kong’s mini-constitution, not in the Sino-British joint declaration on the future of Hong Kong. Nor did the British overlords take action to return power to the people until they learned that there would be no hope of extending British rule beyond 1997.

It is naive to suggest that universal suffrage will solve all Hong Kong’s problems. Its people, especially the young, are deeply angered by the acute housing and land shortage, the widening wealth gap, worsening living conditions and the narrowing opportunities for upward mobility because of competition from a rising China. Hong Kong, however, is not unique in experiencing deep divisions because of growing disparities.

Universal suffrage to elect the city’s leader, with groups fighting on opposing ideological or socioeconomic platforms, would serve only to amplify the existing schisms. Britain’s recent political polarisation among Remainers and Leavers is a cautionary tale for those who have romantic illusions about democracy. Our city’s priority must lie in tackling deep-rooted social and economic problems with a view to improving the livelihood of our people.

regina ip
Member of Hong Kong’s
Legislative Council
Hong Kong

Maybe PAP govt should have offered her a job in the civil service after she resigned as Secretary for Security. She’s their kind of FT: what with her dismissal of universal suffrage, and emphasis on security and keeping the masses contented. But she really has talent, and has a mind of her own, like many Hongkies.

Related posts:

How Xi can hurt HK the non violent way

HK demonstrations: What I’d like to know

Why Sino-US Cold War is great for our economy

In China, Economy, Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam on 22/07/2019 at 5:37 am

It’ll do for our economy what the Vietnam War did for HK and our economies: spur economic growth

Further to Will the last US MNC leaving China switch off the lights, the charts below show almost nothing is made in America. Almost everything is made in China, and almost the rest in Asean i.e. countries like Vietnam, Indonesia and M’sia.

As the regional trading, financial heart and hi-tech manufacturing centre (Think Ang moh manufacturer employs more people here than in China and planning to employ a lot more) of Asean, we’ll benefit (Think Ang moh who bot S$73.8m flat).

Bang yr balls Oz-based TRE cybernut and funder “Oxygen”. Left S’pore a long time ago but still hates S’pore and wishes us ill. But still has CPF account. Used to evade Oz tax, it’s alleged by Secret Squirrel.

But of course short term we suffer: “Only cold spell coming, but not Winter,” says Heng. 

Vote wisely. Remember: IMF affirms support for PAP policies.

 

 

Will the last US MNC leaving China switch off the lights

In China on 19/07/2019 at 3:50 pm

Further to Apple planning to leave China with help of Taiwanese Foxconn, big US MNCs such as HP, Dell, Microsoft and Amazon are looking to shift big amounts of their production out of China, says the Nikkei Asian Review. The potential exodus reveals how the US-China tech war is accelerating the already underway cost-push migration of capacity to SE Asia.

The plans vary for each company.

HP and Dell, which together command about 30% of the global personal computer market, are planning to shift up to 30% of their notebook production out of China. Microsoft, Google and Amazon are considering moving some of their game console and smart speaker manufacturing out of the country.

Others are evaluating options.

These plans have not changed since President Donald Trump signalled at the G20 meeting in Japan a possible softening of a ban on US businesses exporting technology to China. US policy is too uncertain, it says

But can US MNCs manage to move? Nikkei doesn’t bother to analyse. Watch this space for analysis.

How Hongkies organised leaderless protests

In China, Hong Kong on 18/07/2019 at 11:32 am

An excerpt from a BBC report. I recommend that real anti-PAP warriors read the report to pick up tips.

Many of the calls to protest are made anonymously, on message boards and in group chats on encrypted messaging apps.

Some groups have up to 70,000 active subscribers, representing about 1% of Hong Kong’s entire population. Many provide updates and first-hand reports relating to the protests, while others act as a crowdsourced lookout for police, warning protestors of nearby activity.

There are also smaller groups made up of lawyers, first aiders and medics. They provide legal advice and get supplies to protesters on the front lines.

Demonstrators say the online co-ordination of protests offers a convenient and instant way to disseminate information. The chat groups also let participants vote – in real time – to decide the next moves.

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-48802125

Huawei bites back

In China on 16/07/2019 at 1:56 pm

Huawei is planning extensive job cuts in the US, the Wall Street Journal has reported, citing anonymous sources. Huawei has declined to comment.

HK: What MSM and alt media don’t tell us

In China, Hong Kong on 09/07/2019 at 4:36 am

Both by our constructive, nation-building media and alt media. Both focus on faking the news to further their pro-PAP and anti-PAP agendas respectively.

I got these four great insights on the situation HK from the Financial Times.

Inside, it was chaos. An alarm was ringing, papers were scattered over the floor, the walls were covered in anti-government graffiti. On closer inspection, though, it was a finely calibrated act of provocation; protesters had vandalised the emblems of power but had been careful to leave libraries and cultural artefacts untouched. They’d even left money in the fridge to pay for drinks they’d consumed.

Louise Lim on what she saw inside the the thrashed LegCo

PAP BS that the violence was mindless. No wonder there was wide-spread approval of what the thrashers did.

The police’s reasoning for allowing the storming

Police defended their withdrawal from the Legislative Council complex, saying a decision was made on safety grounds to avoid possible “physical encounters” with protesters in a confined space. The force said protesters had used “poisonous and inflammable chemicals” to attack police officers during the day and if they had attempted to ignite these chemicals inside the building, the consequences would have been “unimaginable”.

One could be sceptical of the reasoning, but I never saw this reported here. Why?

This from an FT reader on the uselessness of the Chinese propaganda machine in HK

“It’s simply amazing that foreign powers can exert such an influence on this generation of Hong Kong youngsters who are often criticised for their poor command of English. The whole CCP propaganda machine in Hong Kong that has received limitless funding for the last 22 years, should be summarily dismissed for gross incompetence!!”

Gives the lie that our constructive, nation-building media imply: that the HK people are ang moh tua kees.

And last but not least, this illustration sums up the situation:

HK: LegCo thrashing not PRC black ops

In China, Hong Kong on 04/07/2019 at 4:28 am

Further to HK: Frustration, Carrie’s gambit or PRC black ops?, where I voiced tots that the  thrashing of LegCo could have been a PRC black ops operation (“Peanuts” mob and police “cooperation”), it’s now clear that it was more the result of the frustration of some useful idiots and a head prefect’s gambit that the useful idiots accepted. We’ll have to watch and wait to see who wins.

Hong Kong protests: Parliament ‘never represented its people’

On the night of 1 July, hundreds of protesters forcibly broke into Hong Kong’s parliamentary Legislative Council building.

Pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong, who did not take part, explains why protesters felt that action was necessary.

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-asia-china-48824110/hong-kong-protests-parliament-never-represented-its-people

With useful idiots as Joshua Wong (He reminds me of our very own Mad Dog, now thankfully under sedation by RI doctors from the SDP), Xi doesn’t need to send in the PRC armed police.

 

HK: Frustration, Carrie’s gambit or PRC black ops?

In China, Hong Kong on 03/07/2019 at 10:36 am

Here is what a protester who was part of group that thrashed LegCo said

“Some people might say this is wrong but to us it is a necessary evil,” said one man wearing a gas mask, who identified himself only as Henry, as protesters threw eggs inside the Legislative Council, Hong Kong’s de facto parliament. “One million of us marched peacefully, two million of us marched peacefully and yet the government didn’t listen to us.”

FT report

Police inaction has led to suspicions that the break-in was encouraged* (Wilder speculation has the break-in attributed to PRC operatives and the usual “useful idiots”**)

At around midday, dozens of demonstrators broke off from the main protest and made their way to LegCo.

They effectively besieged the building, as a large crowd of several hundred watched from a distance, before eventually smashing their way through the glass facade.

Inside, they defaced the emblem of Hong Kong in the central chamber, raised the old British colonial flag, spray-painted messages across the walls and shattered furniture.

At about midnight outside the building, protesters clad in plastic helmets and brandishing umbrellas retreated from a baton charge by riot police, who quickly overcame their makeshift barriers.

Within an hour, the streets around the building were clear of everyone except the media and police.

BBC

Watch these

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-asia-48834050/inside-hong-kong-s-parliament-after-protesters-were-evicted

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-asia-china-48821664/hong-kong-protesters-removed-from-hk-parliament-building

Related posts:

HK protestors prove George Orwell’s point

Why Hongkies sang ‘Sing Hallelujah to the Lord’

HK demonstrations: What I’d like to know


*Why did Lam remove the guards, inviting in the provocateurs?

**Were these protesters provocative agents of Communist China?

 

 

Weaker Yuen is not gd for us

In China, Currencies, Economy on 02/07/2019 at 4:13 am

Neil Mellor at BNY Mellon, makes the case that so long as a weaker renminbi does not ensue, “there could still be positive implications for markets if no agreement, or an agreement to continue talking, were to trigger another, and possibly more substantial, round of stimulus from Beijing”.

That could well boost regional currencies, including those for Taiwan, South Korea, S’pore and the Philippines. A broader rally would bolster commodities, the Australian dollar and eurozone equities.

Chinese hold up the sky in luxury watch mkt

In China, Political economy on 30/06/2019 at 4:47 am

Mao and other revolutionaries will not be happy that despite all the suffering and deaths they inflicted on the Chinese to build a Communist state that, “40% of the overall global luxury watch consumption is Chinese.” This was said by the chief executive Davide Traxler of Parmigiani Fleurier, a once great brand.

He says half the lossmaking watch brand’s social media budget will go on China because “Those consumers also consume in London and Paris and wherever they go, but marketing has to be done in their home countries.” Other areas that buy luxury watches are the rest of Asia, the US and Middle East.

Europeans are too poor according to him.

That’s the downside of countries that provide generous help for the poor. The money got to come from somewhere.

How Xi can hurt HK the non violent way

In China, Hong Kong on 26/06/2019 at 11:17 am

His government is trying to create a “Greater Bay Area” an area that includes Hong Kong, Macau and mainland cities in the fast-growing Pearl River Delta, a region with a population of 70m and which has a GDP around that of Australia.

Hong Kong would be the main financial centre for the area and China would “steadily expand the channels for mainland and Hong Kong residents to invest in financial products in each other’s market”.

Well it could sacrifice some economic and financial efficiency by not making HK the main financial centre. It could promote financial activities in other cities.

Let the Hongkies see if they can eat and drink ang moh ideals: Why Hongkies sang ‘Sing Hallelujah to the Lord’

HK protestors prove George Orwell’s point

In China, Hong Kong on 24/06/2019 at 2:18 pm

The announcement by Hong Kong’s chief executive Carrie Lam that she was suspending the proposal surprised many China-watchers, who had assumed that President Xi Jinping in Beijing would be reluctant to back down and lose face. The fact that Mr Xi decided to hit the pause button suggests that the Chinese president and the Hong Kong government have collectively realised that the greatest risk facing them now is not perceived weakness, but chaos and violence on the streets of Hong Kong that could have significant domestic and international repercussions.

Emphasis mine

Well George Orwell did write

Since pacifists have more freedom of action in countries where traces of democracy survive, pacifism can act more effectively against democracy than for it. Objectively the pacifist is pro-Nazi.

“No, Not One”, Adelphi (October 1941)

A few yrs later, he elaborated further about the uselessness of pacifism or civil disobedience where democracy is absent (emphasis mine)

[Gandhi] believed in “arousing the world”, which is only possible if the world gets a chance to hear what you are doing. It is difficult to see how Gandhi’s methods could be applied in a country where opponents of the regime disappear in the middle of the night and are never heard of again. Without a free press and the right of assembly, it is impossible not merely to appeal to outside opinion, but to bring a mass movement into being, or even to make your intentions known to your adversary. Is there a Gandhi in Russia at this moment? And if there is, what is he accomplishing? The Russian masses could only practise civil disobedience if the same idea happened to occur to all of them simultaneously, and even then, to judge by the history of the Ukraine famine, it would make no difference. But let it be granted that non-violent resistance can be effective against one’s own government, or against an occupying power: even so, how does one put it into practise internationally? Gandhi’s various conflicting statements on the late war seem to show that he felt the difficulty of this. Applied to foreign politics, pacifism either stops being pacifist or becomes appeasement. Moreover the assumption, which served Gandhi so well in dealing with individuals, that all human beings are more or less approachable and will respond to a generous gesture, needs to be seriously questioned. It is not necessarily true, for example, when you are dealing with lunatics. Then the question becomes: Who is sane? Was Hitler sane? And is it not possible for one whole culture to be insane by the standards of another? And, so far as one can gauge the feelings of whole nations, is there any apparent connection between a generous deed and a friendly response? Is gratitude a factor in international politics?

http://www.orwell.ru/library/reviews/gandhi/english/e_gandhi

Related posts:

Keeping power in a one-party state

Would this happen in a one-party state?

Did Hali ask Xi for this app when they met?

“There is freedom of speech, but I cannot guarantee freedom after speech”

 

Why Hongkies sang ‘Sing Hallelujah to the Lord’

In China, Hong Kong on 23/06/2019 at 1:39 pm

I refer to HK: See the people walk, Hear the people sing.

Hallelujah to the Lord” became the unofficial anthem of crowds protesting against a controversial proposed law that would allow people accused of crimes in China to be extradited to the mainland not because the protesting Hongkies are Christians, or are ang moh tua kees or because CIA and MI6 operatives taught the organisers of the protesters the song in boot camp.

And definitely not because the protesters want to annoy Grandpa Xi and the other Chinese leaders who are all atheists.

Maybe it could to shame and irritate his head prefect in HK? After all Carrie Lam was once head prefect in a convent school and this song could be to remind her that as a devoted Roman Catholic she should not be the HK running dog of the atheistic Chinese Communist Party?

Here’s why according to BBC

For Christians in Hong Kong, the hymn is a sign of faith but also of their concerns that it’s not only political but also religious issues that are at stake, should the bill ever pass.

And

The hymn was picked up by other protesters – soon even non-Christians were singing it.

Because

“People picked up this song as it is short and easy to remember,” Edwin Chow, 19, acting president of the Hong Kong Federation of Catholic Students, told the BBC. “There’s only one line: ‘Sing Hallelujah to the Lord’.”

Also

The protesters said they sang it hoping it would have a calming effect on police, and would help diffuse tensions.

This was especially needed after police had earlier fired tear gas and shooting rubber bullets towards protesters.

Finally

The song also acted as a political shield, of sorts.

“According to the law, any religious assemblies in public areas are not considered as illegal, so if people sing hymns together, it could actually work as a protection and guarantee that [they] stay safe,” said Mr Chow.

“Therefore people started to sing this song to protect themselves.”

Btw, in case Terry Xu or Mad Dog is thinking of starting up a church, this loophole doesn’t exist in S’pore. Related post: Seelan Palay: Sylvia Lim was right

 

 

Apple planning to leave China with help of Taiwanese Foxconn

In China on 22/06/2019 at 9:23 am

Yet more headaches for Grandpa Xi on top of having to deal with his spoiled bastard grandchildren from HK, and an uncouth ang moh kaw (or is it quai low?)

From FT’s Tech Scroll Asia

Apple has sounded out its major suppliers over the cost implications of shifting 15 to 30 per cent of its production capacity from China to south-east Asian countries as it prepares to restructure its supply chain, according to this scoop from the Nikkei Asian Review. Although the shift is yet to happen, the size of Apple’s supply chain in China — and the signal this potential move sends to others — makes this a vital issue.

Key Implications: The concerns of Apple over its exposure to China derive in part from the protracted trade tensions between Washington and Beijing. But even if such tensions are resolved, several sources said there would be “no turning back”. Apple has decided that China’s lower birth rate and higher labour costs add to the risks of overconcentration in one country.

Upshot: Apple’s move heralds what is likely to be a big shift of manufacturing supply chains from China to south-east Asia. Indeed, this is already under way. Foxconn, Pegatron, Wistron, Quanta Computer, Compal Electronics and key Apple suppliers have all been asked to evaluate options outside of China.

Earlier in the week, FT reported that Foxconn said it could help Apple, for example, move iPhone production out of China if necessary. Foxconn told companies worried about the trade war between Beijing and Washington that it can move electronics production for the US market out of China at short notice and said 25% of its total capacity is now outside of China.

HK: See the people walk, Hear the people sing

In China, Hong Kong on 21/06/2019 at 4:35 am

IT WAS PROBABLY the largest political protest ever staged in Hong Kong. It may have been the biggest in China’s history. Organisers reckon that about 1.9m people joined the demonstration on June 16th. Even during the unrest in Tiananmen Square three decades ago, no single protest approached that scale.

Economist

They sang in English, “Do you hear the people sing?” and “Sing Hallelujah To The Lord”.

Organisers say two million people have turned out for a demonstration in Hong Kong, the latest large protest against a controversial extradition bill.

But what did the protests look like on the ground?

We collated images taken within a short time of each other that show the extent of the crowds in Hong Kong on Sunday.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-48655634

(Do look at the photos to see the scale of the protests.)

Which version would our Protection against Online Falsehoods and Manipulation say is fake? Grandpa Xi heard the Hongkies sing or Not fear of the people singing but fear of US growling made Xi chicken-out?

But maybe both reflect different facets of a very complicated situation.

What do u think?

HK demonstrations: What I’d like to know

In China, Hong Kong on 17/06/2019 at 4:51 am

How many of the protesters are mainland tourists or long term residents of HK from China.

The crowds are massive, no doubt about it. And Hongkies are really upset, no doubt about it: Not fear of the people singing but fear of US growling made Xi chicken-out.

But I’m curious about whether there are substantial numbers of mainlanders in the crowds, who are there really to protest against Xi.

The tourist numbers from China are staggering, fyi,

From January to November last year, about 58.6 million tourists visited Hong Kong, up 10.7 per cent from the previous year. Among them, 45.9 million were mainland tourists, an increase of 14.2 per cent from the same period in 2017.

In November, the number of mainland day trippers jumped 40.3 per cent year on year to a record 2.9 million, and accounted for 86.5 per cent of the city’s total of same-day arrivals.

Alan Au, a member of a Hung Hom community group, said it was common to see 300 mainland tourists blocking the streets as they waited for coaches in some parts of the district.

SCMP in January 2019

Not fear of the people singing but fear of US growling made Xi chicken-out

In China, Hong Kong on 16/06/2019 at 1:28 pm

Further to this, Grandpa Xi heard the Hongkies sing, the truth seems to be a lot more complicated.

No, people power didn’t make Xi’s head prefect in HK suspend, as she claimed. rather than withdrawn the extradition bill, arguing the amendment was well intended but had been poorly communicated to the stupid ang moh tua kee Hongkies.

It all has to with America being the tua kee capable of destroying HK’s economy and damaging China. (Today, HK contributes a  mere 3% of China’s GNP, down from 20% in 1997 but when winter’s arrived in the form of an economic slow down and a trade skirmish with the US, every little bit helps.)

[T]he US, began eyeing the territory as another possible stick with which to beat Beijing in the trade war. Congress on Thursday introduced a bipartisan Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act that could remove the city’s unique trading privileges with the US if the government did not uphold its freedoms.

FT

As the BBC reported

US lawmakers have introduced a bill to amend the Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992. The amendment requires the US Secretary of State to “issue an annual certification of Hong Kong’s autonomy to justify special treatment” by the US.

“The bigger issue is probably that the global perception of Hong Kong as a separate part of China is under threat. And that includes official recognition of Hong Kong as a separate customs, immigration, tax and legal jurisdiction,” said David Webb, editor of Webb-site.com and long-time resident of Hong Kong.

“If Hong Kong loses its separate status then, for example, all of the duties that America has applied to Chinese exports would apply to Hong Kong exports. And any prohibitions on transfers of high grade technology to China would apply to Hong Kong as well.”

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-48618585

The U-turn is a humiliation for Xi and Beijing. The people of HK will suffer.

Related post: Keeping power in a one-party state

 

Grandpa Xi heard the Hongkies sing

In China, Hong Kong on 16/06/2019 at 5:03 am

And backed off.

His head prefect in HK emphasised she had suspended rather than withdrawn the bill, arguing the amendment was well intended but had been poorly communicated to the stupid ang moh tua kee Hongkies. Ms Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, was the head prefect in her HK convent school, really.

This song is not allowed to be streamed in China, but the Hongkies sang it as they protested and won a victory that they did not expect to win.

Do you hear the people sing?
Singing the songs of angry men?
It is the music of the people
Who will not be slaves again!
When the beating of your heart
Echoes the beating of the drums
There is a life about to start
When tomorrow comes!
Will you join in our crusade?
Who will be strong and stand with me?
Somewhere beyond the barricade
Is there a world you long to see?
Then join in the fight
That will give you the right to be free!
Do you hear the people sing?
Singing the songs of angry men?
It is the music of the people
Who will not be slaves again!
When the beating of your heart
Echoes the beating of the drums
There is a life about to start
When tomorrow comes!
Will you give all you can give
So that our banner may advance
Some will fall and some will live
Will you stand up and take your chance?
The blood of the martyrs
Will water the meadows of France!

Do you hear the people sing?
Singing the songs of angry men?
It is the music of the people
Who will not be slaves again!
When the beating of your heart
Echoes the beating of the drums
There is a life about to start
When tomorrow comes

The bad news is that the students and others who supposedly sang this song in 1848 were killed in the French predecessor of Tiananmen.

But it’s a famous victory still for the Hongkies. So let’s give them three cheers. And hope for the best.

Where China can make America Cry Uncle

In China on 15/06/2019 at 5:02 am

Stop its students from studying in the USA

The United States is the number one destination for Chinese students seeking to study abroad.

They make up one-third of the total international body in the US and pay significant sums to study at top institutions.

BBC report

Serious money: billions

Chinese cuisine with German characteristics

In China on 09/06/2019 at 4:59 am

Steamed dumplings filled with German sausage and sauerkraut. Sounds yummy.

Aldi, a German owned supermarket catering to cheapskates in Europe, the UK and the USA, has juz opened two stores in Shanghai. On sale are steamed dumplings filled with German sausage and sauerkraut alongside chicken feet and salted duck eggs. And cheap European wine and beer from the Aldi’s house brands are also available

Iran today, China tomorrow: What US will do

In Banks, China on 27/05/2019 at 9:42 am

The US Department of Justice (even under wimp Obama) has gone after foreign banks for trading with countries like Iran: the global financial system being dominated by the US dollar. A French bank was crucified, StanChart bashed on the head etc because they did biz with countries the US didn’t like.

Financial system can be used against China too.

And if sells its US treasury notes, it hurts itself. Also what can it buy with the US$ it holds in lieu of notes? Japan and Germany will make China pay to hold their debt: already at negative yields. And if it sells the US$ it holds for euros etc, how is it going to fund its Belt and Road projects using those currencies.

Why Korea is happy with US ban on Huawei

In China on 26/05/2019 at 7:39 am

Because Samsung is happy. No chance of Huawei overtaking it in smartphone sales.

Huawei could see shipments decline by as much as a quarter this year, and faces the possibility that its smartphones will disappear from international markets, analysts have said.

Smartphone shipments at Huawei, the world’s second-largest smartphone maker by volume (after Samsung), could fall between 4% and 24% in 2019 if the ban stays in place, according to Fubon Research and Strategy Analytics.

Where US has to buy from China

In China, Internet on 25/05/2019 at 2:35 pm

Many Chinese surveillance cameras are fitted with artificial intelligence including facial recognition technology, and some can read simple faces, or can estimate age, ethnicity and gender.

There are more than 170 million surveillance cameras and the country has plans to install a further 400 million by 2020.

 

How Tun saboed Jack Ma

In China on 23/05/2019 at 10:45 am

“When a foreign leader came to China and the first person he wanted to meet was Jack Ma rather than [President] Xi Jinping, you knew the company was going to be in trouble,” said a venture capitalist who has close ties with Alibaba. He was referring to Malaysian prime minister Mahathir Mohamad’s decision to visit Mr Ma in 2018 before heading to Beijing for a meeting with the Chinese president.

Venture capitalist quoted by FT

Since then Alibaba has had several run-ins with the Chinese authorities, including regulatory and IPO problems at Ant Finance.

With admirer like Tun, who needs enemies.

And he has admirers here?

— Kirsten Han trying to defecate herself and PJ out of self-made crater

— Jolovan Wham: Nothing wrong in asking Tun M to intervene in S’porean affairs

— Tan Kin Lian thinks Tun is more sinned against than sinning

Tencent doing it’s bit for Chinese culture

In China on 20/05/2019 at 5:01 am

Tencent has linked up with overseas museums that have Chinese collections, showing the country’s artefacts to the world while helping the domestic audience to view collections online.

 

Did Hali ask Xi for this app when they met?

In China, Internet on 16/05/2019 at 11:15 am

Hali’s welcome by the Chinese reminded me that the Chinese have an app that will help Heng and other 4G leaders keep S’pore a one-party state, like China:

—  Keeping power in a one-party state

—  Would this happen in a one-party state?

Seriously, like China, S’pore is concerned about terrorists. An app is being used in Xinjiang to keep China safe from the coreligionists of Hali and TRE’s bapak (Note bapak not Bapak).

—————————————————

bapak not Bapak

Btw, Morocco Mole, Secret Squirrel’s sidekick, told me that his second cousin removed working in the ISD alleges that TRE took down its republication of Watain ban: playing the easily offended game can backfire when it was threatened with suicide denial of service attacks by Jihadist Jills and Joes from bapak’s harem. (note bapak not Bapak.) Seriously, they told TRE that the first paragraph was so offensive and could get TRE into trouble with the law. Well, the original article still stands despite Harder Truths saying he’d report me: lying as usual. Or maybe, I got good ISD connections?

———————————————————

According to Human Rights Watch, predictive policing in Xinjiang comes in the form of a smartphone app, with access to data about citizens’ religion, travel history, family connections and more. Those deemed suspicious by the algorithm may potentially be taken into custody. Sounds a good thing to have in the war against terrorism.

But according to human rights activists (They not scared of being bombed or knifed is it?) this app represents a deeply disturbing scenario in which government repression and mass surveillance intersect because itpulls down data from mobile phones to build up encyclopedic knowledge of those it tracks in China.

When China and US row

In China, Economy on 13/05/2019 at 4:18 am

This is what happens to the world.

 

 

(Artist Walker Wright created the skeleton from driftwood while the vomit was made from washed-up plastic.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-48193779?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment_and_arts&link_location=live-reporting-story)

Meanwhile

 

 

 

 

Chinese are sheep

In China on 07/05/2019 at 4:51 am

They are led by their noses by online KOLs (Key Opinion Leaders)

A new McKinsey report here contains the finding that 94 per cent of Chinese luxury shoppers get their information from online KOLs (Key Opinion Leaders). This is far higher than for traditional ads, which influence only 39 per cent of shoppers. No wonder that Ruhnn Holdings, a platform for Chinese KOLs, just managed to list on the Nasdaq. The IPO didn’t go well, but that doesn’t alter the fact that Chinese consumers are still the biggest force in luxury, buying $115bn last year — one-third of the world’s total luxury sales.

Related post: Why ang moh luxury brands lick Chinese p***ies

Telsa’s made-in-China “brain”

In China on 05/05/2019 at 5:40 pm

Only in America: US trade officials have rejected Tesla’s request for relief from the 25% tariffs on the Chinese-made computer “brain” of its Model 3 electric vehicle, says Reuters. The tariff was imposed by The Donald to Make America Great Again.

Telsa is an all-American electric car manufacturer.

Eat a durian and fail breathanalyser test

In China on 04/05/2019 at 3:56 am

A man in China has failed an on-the-spot breathalyser test after eating too much durian fruit.

According to Chinese video website Pear Video, an unnamed man in Rudong county, in the eastern province of Jiangsu, was pulled over by the police on 17 April for suspected drink-driving.

He failed his breathalyzer test, but was filmed by police protesting: “I’ve just eaten durian fruit!”

A follow-up blood test proved that there was no alcohol in his system, putting the man in the clear.

But it also prompted local police to subsequently carry out tests themselves, to check the legitimacy of the man’s claims.

https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-news-from-elsewhere-48123775

The man was right.

Meritocracy? What meritocracy? How our PMs are chosen

In China, Currencies, Political governance, Public Administration on 29/04/2019 at 10:42 am

But first, where Heng and Tharman failed.

Further to  what was reported in London trashes S’pore, London in 2019 is still the king of the offshore renminbi payments market according to the Chinese.

The UK (i.e. London) accounted for 37% of renminbi foreign exchange transactions outside of China in January.In the final quarter of 2018, average daily trading volumes of the Chinese currency in London reached £76.6 billion, up nearly 50% on the same period in 2017, according to a report published on Wednesday by the City of London Corporation and the People’s Bank of China’s Europe Representative Office.

I ask again

Tot PAP govt said we had plans to be a leading off-shore renminbi trading centre.

What went wrong? After all we are already a leading global FX trading centre.

London trashes S’pore

And Heng is DPM and PM presumptive? While ang moh tua kees and some anti-PAP types want Tharman as PM?

Failure is being rewarded?

Thinking about it our PM became PM after failing big time:

Another decade, another restructuring report?

In the 80s, one Lee Hsien Loong as trade and industry minister headed a committee to recommend changes in the economy. In the early noughties when DPM he headed another committee on the same issue.

In 2010, one Tharman and his committee produced the 2010 Economic Strategies Committee (ESC). And now there’s the CFE. It’s a bit early, but then there wasn’t a report in the 90s: so maybe making up for lost time?
If Lee Hsien loong’s 1980s plan was so successful, why keep needing plans every decade? Plan succeeded, but circumstances change said people from constructive, nation-building media like Balji and Bertha then. Really?  Since that plan, new plans that are a copy and paste from the previous one: Economic restructuring: This time, it’s really different.
(And anyway can believe Bertha and Balji, now that they telling us how they helped PAP govt fix JBJ?)

Connecting SMRT failures, 4th gen ministers & change of PM (Another Heng cock-up)

Why do we keep getting mediocre ministers?

Why cabinet can’t do bold new ideas

 

What about the pink elephant in the corner, DPM Teo?

In China, Public Administration on 17/04/2019 at 11:02 am

I couldn’t but think the above, when I read in the constructive, nation-building CNA:

Despite their vast difference in size, Singapore and China have common issues to tackle, Singapore’s Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean said on Monday (Apr 15) as he hailed the good bilateral ties between the two countries.

These issues cover areas like economic transformation, skills retraining and managing an ageing population.

Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/singapore-china-have-common-issues-to-tackle-dpm-teo-chee-hean-11447412

Funny he doesn’t mention the area where both ruling parties have a common interest: suppressing fake news.

Our very own, pending, draconian law on fake news ( Fake news law: Ownself judge ownself) sounds very much like what China already has: the ruling party decides what is fake news. But to be fair to S’pore, the PAP govt says that there’ll be an appeals procedure making the judiciary the decision-maker. In China, the judges are subordinate to the party. According to our Constitution, our judiciary is independent.

The CCP way is the PAP way: The PAP way?

 

Americans love Chinese food

In China on 17/04/2019 at 4:12 am

Chinese cooks were exempted from anti-immigration laws aimed at the the Yellow Peril.

In the 1880s, the US passed legislation barring Chinese workers from immigrating to the US. Only a few categories were exempt – including restaurateurs – and historians say this contributed to a boom in Chinese restaurants in the US.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-47892747

Microsoft & Chinese workers make Jack Ma eat bitter

In China on 16/04/2019 at 4:27 am

Enabled  by US technology (See How Microsoft is subverting China), young Chinese tech workers make Jack Ma eat his words about working overtime ( In China, the 996 schedule means working 9am to 9pm, six days a week) being a “huge blessing” for young workers.

Alibaba Group founder and billionaire Jack Ma again weighed in on the Chinese tech industry’s gruelling overtime work culture on Sunday, this time calling enforced long hours “unsustainable”.

Ma’s comment followed his remarks on Thursday that working overtime could be a “huge blessing” for young workers who found careers they were dedicated to.

He was responding to a debate that has emerged in recent weeks among Chinese tech workers over the 996 schedule, which means working 9am to 9pm, six days a week. Industry workers set up a discussion group called “996.ICU” on the code-sharing platform GitHub, suggesting that anyone working those hours all the time could end up in a hospital intensive care unit with burnout.

“If you find a job you like, the 996 problem does not exist; if you’re not passionate about it, every minute of going to work is a torment,” Ma said in a post on his Weibo account on Sunday.

“No one likes working at a company that forces you to do ‘996’. Not only is it inhumane, it’s unhealthy and even more unsustainable for long periods – plus workers, relatives and the law do not approve of it,” he said. “In the long term, even if you pay a higher salary, employees will all leave.”
Ma added that companies that thought they could profit by forcing staff to work overtime were “foolish” and doomed to fail.

https://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/3006127/alibaba-founder-jack-ma-says-companies-forcing-staff-work

Grandpa Xi will not be happy.

Young Chinese workers are “Making America Great Again” by preventing “China from Rising”. Green cards for them, and not for Indians.

How Microsoft is subverting China

In China, Internet on 14/04/2019 at 10:48 am

We read a lot in reputable Western media about how China is attempting to subvert Western liberal democracies. But we don’t hear there about how the US (the Europeans, Antipodeans, Canadians and Japanese juz roll over and play dead ) is striking back, or that China may actually be only defending itself against US subversion.

TrumpLand is using a tactic that Sun Tzu would approve: providing tools to enable lazy, unpatriotic, entitled young Chinese tech workers to demand shorter working hours.

FT headline:

China tech worker protest against long working hours goes viral

Online campaign against working 9am-9pm six days a week hits nerve with youth

It reported that the Chinese organisers are rallying support via a project on GitHub, the Microsoft-owned collaboration platform for coders and developers. The project is called 996.icu, because by working 9am-9pm, six days a week , as the English version puts it, “you might need to stay in an Intensive Care Unit someday”. They insist this is not a political protest.

The movement is being organised by volunteers on collaborative platforms — primarily Microsoft’s GitHub, used for code-sharing, as well as Slack, used for messaging. Both are US tech cos.

JD.com said in response to media reports of employees complaining that their 996 schedule was a way of forcing resignations, “We will not force employees to work overtime, but we encourage everyone to fully invest themselves.” Define “fully invest themselves” please.

Workers of China unite against Chinese tech giants and Make America Great Again.

Why ang moh luxury brands lick Chinese p***ies

In China on 14/04/2019 at 4:19 am

Further to China is Great Again

Chinese consumers account for about a third of the world’s $1.2tn luxury goods sales, according to consultancy Bain, which predicts Chinese luxury sales will grow at a “mid teens” rate this year, down from 20 per cent last year.

Much of that growth is driven by “new wealthy female consumers in their 20s who are purchasing for the first time”, said Erwan Rambourg, an industry analyst at HSBC, which predicts China luxury sales growth of 12 per cent, about half that of 2018.

FT

China is Great Again

In China on 13/04/2019 at 11:00 am

A UK royal (Duchess of Cambridge) and the UK PM wear clothes owned by a Chinese company.

Most of the UK assets of LK Bennett, the fashion and shoe retailer that went bust recently whose customers include prime minister Theresa May and the Duchess of Cambridge, have been sold to a company controlled by its Chinese franchisee.

 

London trashes S’pore

In China, Currencies on 12/04/2019 at 4:45 am

Not reported by constructive, nation-building media. Not unusual. But anti-PAP alt media is silent too. Why? Sad.

According to Swift , the payments company, more than 36% of renminbi transactions were carried out in the UK in December last year, compared with about 6% each in France and Singapore.

Tot PAP govt said we had plans to be a leading off-shore renminbi trading centre.

What went wrong? After all we are already a leading global FX trading centre.

 

Chinese miss out on two of life’s greatest pleasures

In China, Hong Kong on 08/04/2019 at 4:25 am

One is enjoying diary products like fresh milk, butter and cheese because of lactose intolerance:

Approximately 65 percent of the human population has a reduced ability to digest lactose after infancy. Lactose intolerance in adulthood is most prevalent in people of East Asian descent, affecting more than 90 percent of adults in some of these communities.

Lactose intolerance – Genetics Home Reference – NIH

https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/lactose-intolerance

The other is not being able to enjoy booze by having a combination of genes that puts us off drinking alcohol. It causes an unpleasant reaction and makes them feel unwell.

Further to Fake news on alcohol and stroke, if you did not read the BBC article I referenced there, you’d have missed something the bit about alcohol intolerance:

East Asian countries are useful places to study the effects of alcohol.

Many people with Chinese ancestry have a combination of genes that puts them off drinking alcohol. It causes an unpleasant reaction and makes them feel unwell.

As a result, there is a wide variation of alcohol intake in China – one in three men doesn’t drink and very few women do.

But by comparing the health outcomes of drinkers and non-drinkers according to their genetic profile, scientists say they have been able to assess – with much more certainty than before – the direct effects of alcohol on stroke risk, distinct from any other factors.

Western populations don’t possess these genes, so it would be impossible to carry out a similar study here.

And most studies are observational, which makes it’s difficult to judge which factor is causing what effect.

Dr Iona Millwood, study author and senior epidemiologist at the University of Oxford, said: “Our genetic analyses have helped us understand the cause and effect relationships.”

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-47817650

No wonder, we Chinese compensate for these defects by eating sea slugs, chicken claws, sharks’ fin and other exotics.

 

Downside of China-US trade deal for Asia and Europe

In China, Economy on 06/04/2019 at 1:40 pm

Citi says that should Chinese import capacity not increase and China imports up to an additional US$200bn worth of US goods — “the economies more exposed to China would be the most vulnerable to any adjustment in trade flows”.

Asian economies would be the most exposed if trade flows are adjusted from a proportional market share perspective, while European economies face similar losses across all scenarios.

China tua kee, India sua kee

In China, India on 02/04/2019 at 4:43 am

Last month the Nifty 50 index of Indian stocks gained nearly 8% last month to within touching distance of all-time highs. That beats China’s CSI 300, which rose 5.5% over the same period.

But this monthDragon

Where China leads, the hope is that others follow. Two measures of manufacturing activity for China shifted into expansion mode during March, rising above a reading of 50, helping offset disappointing news elsewhere. That sent the CSI 300 index up nearly 3 per cent and leaves the benchmark in positive territory over the past 12 months.

FT